Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5621
Euripides, Hecuba, 726-727


̔Εκάβη, τί μέλλεις παῖδα σὴν κρύπτειν τάφῳAGA. Why, Hecuba, delayest thou to come, and bury thy girl in her tomb, agreeably to what Talthybius told me, that no one of the Argives should be suffered to touch thy daughter. For our part we leave her alone, and touch her not; but thou art slow, whereat I am astonished. I am come therefore to fetch thee, for every thing there has been well and duly performed, if aught of well there be in this. Ah! what corse is this I see before the tent? some Trojan's too? for that it is no Grecian's, the robes that vest his limbs inform me. HEC. (aside) Thou ill-starr'd wretch! myself I mean, when I say "thou." O Hecuba, what shall I do? Shall I fall at the knees of Agamemnon here, or bear my ills in silence? AGA. Why dost lament turning thy back upon me, and sayest not what has happened? Who is this?


̔Εκάβη, τί μέλλεις παῖδα σὴν κρύπτειν τάφῳHecuba, why are you delaying to come and bury your daughter? for it was for this that Talthybius brought me your message begging that no one of the Argives should touch your child. And so we granted this, and are not touching her


ἐλθοῦς', ἐφ' οἷσπερ Ταλθύβιος ἤγγειλέ μοιHecuba, why are you delaying to come and bury your daughter? for it was for this that Talthybius brought me your message begging that no one of the Argives should touch your child. And so we granted this, and are not touching her


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Euripides, Alcestis, 426-429, 611-612, 614-635, 743-744, 862-863, 866-867, 869-871, 897-902, 911, 916-919, 922, 926-928, 425 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

425. Ho! sirrahs, catch me this woman; hold her fast; for ’tis no welcome story she will have to hear. It was to make thee leave the holy altar of the goddess that I held thy child’s death before thy eyes, and so induced thee to give thyself up to me to die.
2. Euripides, Andromache, 1117-1172, 1176, 1187, 1211, 1218, 1226-1242, 1263-1270, 1116 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1116. εἷς ἦν ἁπάντων τῶνδε μηχανορράφος.
3. Euripides, Bacchae, 1217-1226, 1285, 1300-1329, 1216 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1216. ἕπεσθέ μοι φέροντες ἄθλιον βάρος 1216. Follow me, carrying the miserable burden of Pentheus, follow me, slaves, before the house; exhausted from countless searches, I am bringing his body, for I discovered it in the folds of Kithairon
4. Euripides, Electra, 1277-1280, 1276 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1276. σοὶ μὲν τάδ' εἶπον: τόνδε δ' Αἰγίσθου νέκυν
5. Euripides, Hecuba, 10, 1075-1080, 11, 1114-1115, 1118-1119, 1132-1182, 1187-1199, 12, 1200-1207, 1217-1233, 1240-1251, 1255, 1260, 1267, 1270, 1287-1288, 1292, 13-19, 2, 20-29, 3, 30-39, 4, 40-49, 5, 50-59, 6, 610, 616, 661, 669, 675, 678-680, 684-699, 7, 700-725, 727-732, 736-799, 8, 800-899, 9, 900-904, 919, 923-925, 934, 946-949, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. ̔́Ηκω νεκρῶν κευθμῶνα καὶ σκότου πύλας 1. I have come from out of the charnel-house and gates of gloom, where Hades dwells apart from gods, I Polydorus, a son of Hecuba, the daughter of Cisseus, and of Priam. Now my father, when Phrygia ’s capital
6. Euripides, Helen, 1243, 1260, 1291-1300, 1390-1395, 1400, 1408, 1419, 1528, 1542-1604, 1240 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1240. τί δ'; ἔστ' ἀπόντων τύμβος; ἢ θάψεις σκιάν; 1240. What? Is there a tomb for the absent? Or will you bury a shadow? Helen
7. Euripides, Children of Heracles, 1027-1045, 1159-1162, 1026 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1026. rend= Bury my body after death in its destined grave in front of the shrine of the virgin goddess Pallas. at Pallene. And I will be thy friend and guardian of thy city for ever, where I lie buried in a foreign soil, but a bitter foe to these children’s descendants, whensoe’er Referring to invasions by the Peloponnesians, descendants of the Heracleidae. with gathered host they come against this land, traitors to your kindness now; such are the strangers ye have championed. Why then came I hither, if I knew all this, instead of regarding the god’s oracle? Because I thought, that Hera was mightier far than any oracle, and would not betray me. Waste no drink-offering on my tomb, nor spill the victim’s blood; for I will requite them for my treatment here with a journey they shall rue; and ye shall have double gain from me, for I will help you and harm them by my death. Alcmena 1026. Slay me, I do not ask thee for mercy; yet since this city let me go and shrunk from slaying me, I will reward it with an old oracle of Loxias, which in time will benefit them more than doth appear.
8. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1359-1366, 1358 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Medea, 1378-1383, 1377 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1377. Give up to me those dead, to bury and lament Medea
10. Euripides, Orestes, 1431-1436, 97-99, 114 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1486-1529, 1485 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1485. I do not veil my tender cheek shaded with curls, nor do I feel shame, from maiden modesty, at the dark red beneath my eyes, the blush upon my face, as I hurry on, in bacchic revelry for the dead
12. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 755-759, 778-836, 841-843, 846-931, 934-935, 950-954, 754 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

754. Are ye bringing the bodies, for the which the strife arose? Messenger
13. Euripides, Trojan Women, 1134-1146, 1156-1206, 1240-1245, 1248-1250, 735-739, 1133 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Xenophon, On Household Management, 5.16, 5.19, 9.14 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5.16. And it is no less necessary for a farmer to encourage his labourers often, than for a general to encourage his men. And slaves need the stimulus of good hopes no less, nay, even more than free men, to make them steadfast. 5.19. Well, said Socrates in reply, Mem. I. iv. 15; iv. iii. 12. Cyrop. I. vi. 46. I thought you knew, Critobulus, that the operations of husbandry no less than those of war are in the hands of the gods. And you observe, I suppose, that men engaged in war try to propitate the gods before taking action; and with sacrifices and omens seek to know what they ought to do and what they ought not to do; 9.14. When all this was done, Socrates , I told my wife that all these measures were futile, unless she saw to it herself that our arrangement was strictly adhered to in every detail. I explained that in well-ordered cities the citizens are not satisfied with passing good laws; they go further, and choose guardians of the laws, who act as overseers, commending the law-abiding and punishing law-breakers.
15. Menander, Dyscolus, 843-844, 842 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

16. Menander, Samia, 726 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aetiology Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
alcestis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
andromache Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
aristotle aristotle Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61
athens Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
audience Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61
children of heracles (heraclidae) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
comedy Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61
delphi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
demeas Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61
eidôla, as prologues Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
eidôla, in tragedy Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
eidôla Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
emotions Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61
euripides, eidôla Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
euripides Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61
family Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 57
funerals Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 172, 834
helen Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
hera Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
heracles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
hopelessness, and loss of faith in the gods Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 57
innovation Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61
iphigenia in tauris Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
marriage Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
menander Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61
moschion Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61
mêchanê Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
new comedy Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61
nikeratos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61
nomos Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
oikos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61
performance Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61
plangon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61
polis Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61
reception Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61
rehm, r. xxv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
revenge, hopelessness feeding a passion for revenge Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 57
rhetoric Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61
ritual Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
rohde, e. Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
sophocles Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
tragedy' Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 61
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
tzanetou, a. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 172
weddings Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
women Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 57