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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5621
Euripides, Hecuba, 684-732


ὦ τέκνον τέκνονAh me! it is the corpse of my son Polydorus I behold, whom the Thracian man was keeping safe for me in his halls. Alas! this is the end of all; my life is over. chanting O my son, my son


αἰαῖ, κατάρχομαι γόωνalas! I now begin the laments, a frantic strain I learned just now from some avenging fiend. Maid-servant


βακχεῖον ἐξ ἀλάστοροςalas! I now begin the laments, a frantic strain I learned just now from some avenging fiend. Maid-servant


ἀρτιμαθῆ νόμον.alas! I now begin the laments, a frantic strain I learned just now from some avenging fiend. Maid-servant


ἔγνως γὰρ ἄτην παιδός, ὦ δύστηνε σύ;What! so you knew your son’s fate, poor lady? Hecuba


ἄπιστ' ἄπιστα, καινὰ καινὰ δέρκομαι.I cannot, cannot credit this fresh sight I see. chanting


ἕτερα δ' ἀφ' ἑτέρων κακὰ κακῶν κυρεῖ:One woe succeeds to another; no day will ever pass without groans and tears. Chorus Leader


οὐδέ ποτ' ἀστένακτος ἀδάκρυτος ἁ-One woe succeeds to another; no day will ever pass without groans and tears. Chorus Leader


μέρα μ' ἐπισχήσει.One woe succeeds to another; no day will ever pass without groans and tears. Chorus Leader


δείν', ὦ τάλαινα, δεινὰ πάσχομεν κακά.Alas! poor lady, our sufferings are cruel indeed. Hecuba chanting


ὦ τέκνον τέκνον ταλαίνας ματρόςO my son, child of a luckless mother


τίνι μόρῳ θνῄσκειςwhat was the manner of your death? by what fate do you lie here? by whose hands? Maid-servant


τίνι πότμῳ κεῖσαι;what was the manner of your death? by what fate do you lie here? by whose hands? Maid-servant


πρὸς τίνος ἀνθρώπων;what was the manner of your death? by what fate do you lie here? by whose hands? Maid-servant


οὐκ οἶδ': ἐπ' ἀκταῖς νιν κυρῶ θαλασσίαιςI do not know. I found him on the sea-shore. Hecuba chanting


ἔκβλητον, ἢ πέσημα φοινίου δορόςCast up on the smooth sand, or thrown there


ἐν ψαμάθῳ λευρᾷ;after the murderous blow? Maid-servant


πόντου νιν ἐξήνεγκε πελάγιος κλύδων.The waves had washed him ashore. Hecuba chanting


ὤμοι, αἰαῖ, ἔμαθον ἔνυπνον ὀμμάτωνAlas! alas! I now know the vision I saw in my sleep; the dusky-winged phantom


nanAlas! alas! I now know the vision I saw in my sleep; the dusky-winged phantom


ἐμῶν ὄψιν: οὔ με παρέβαHEC. Woe is me! Now understand I the dream, the vision of mine eyes; the black-winged phantom has not flitted by me in vain, which I saw concerning thee, my child, as being no longer in the light of day. CHOR. But who slew him? canst thou, O skilled in dreams, declare him? HEC. My friend, my friend, who curbs the steed in Thrace, where his aged father placed him for concealment.


ἐμῶν ὄψιν: οὔ με παρέβαAlas! alas! I now know the vision I saw in my sleep; the dusky-winged phantom


φάσμα μελανόπτερον, τὰν ἐσεῖδον ἀμφὶ σέdid not escape me, the vision I saw of you, my son, now no more within the bright sunshine. Chorus Leader


ὦ τέκνον, οὐκέτ' ὄντα Διὸς ἐν φάει.did not escape me, the vision I saw of you, my son, now no more within the bright sunshine. Chorus Leader


nandid not escape me, the vision I saw of you, my son, now no more within the bright sunshine. Chorus Leader


nandid not escape me, the vision I saw of you, my son, now no more within the bright sunshine. Chorus Leader


τίς γάρ νιν ἔκτειν'; οἶσθ' ὀνειρόφρων φράσαι;Who slew him then? Can your dream-lore tell us that? Hecuba chanting


ἐμὸς ἐμὸς ξένος, Θρῄκιος ἱππόταςWho slew him then? Can your dream-lore tell us that? Hecuba chanting


ἵν' ὁ γέρων πατὴρ ἔθετό νιν κρύψας.Who slew him then? Can your dream-lore tell us that? Hecuba chanting


nanWho slew him then? Can your dream-lore tell us that? Hecuba chanting


οἴμοι, τί λέξεις; χρυσὸν ὡς ἔχοι κτανών;CHOR. Ah me! what wilt thou say? Was it to possess his gold that he slew him! HEC. Unutterable deeds, unworthy of a name, surpassing miracles, unhallowed, insufferable! Where are the laws of hospitality? O most accurst of men, how didst thou mar that skin, how sever with the cruel sword the poor limbs of this boy, nor didst feel pity? CHOR. O hapless woman, how has the deity made thee by far the most wretched of mortals, whoever he be that presses heavy on thee! But, my friends, let us henceforward be silent, for I see our lord Agamemnon advancing. AGAMEMNON, CHORUS, HECUBA.


οἴμοι, τί λέξεις; χρυσὸν ὡς ἔχοι κτανών;O horror! what will you say? did he slay him to get the gold? Hecuba chanting


ἄρρητ' ἀνωνόμαστα, θαυμάτων πέραO dreadful crime! O deed without a name! beyond wonder!


οὐχ ὅσι' οὐδ' ἀνεκτά. ποῦ δίκα ξένων;impious! intolerable! Where are the laws between guest and host? Accursed of men! how have you mangled his flesh, slashing the poor child’s limb


ὦ κατάρατ' ἀνδρῶν, ὡς διεμοιράσωimpious! intolerable! Where are the laws between guest and host? Accursed of men! how have you mangled his flesh, slashing the poor child’s limb


nanimpious! intolerable! Where are the laws between guest and host? Accursed of men! how have you mangled his flesh, slashing the poor child’s limb


χρόα, σιδαρέῳ τεμὼν φασγάνῳimpious! intolerable! Where are the laws between guest and host? Accursed of men! how have you mangled his flesh, slashing the poor child’s limb


nanimpious! intolerable! Where are the laws between guest and host? Accursed of men! how have you mangled his flesh, slashing the poor child’s limb


μέλεα τοῦδε παιδὸς οὐδ' ᾤκτισας.with ruthless sword, lost to all sense of pity! Chorus Leader


nanwith ruthless sword, lost to all sense of pity! Chorus Leader


ὦ τλῆμον, ὥς σε πολυπονωτάτην βροτῶνAlas for you! how some deity, whose hand is heavy on you, has sent you troubles beyond all other mortals! But I see our lord and master


δαίμων ἔθηκεν ὅστις ἐστί σοι βαρύς.Alas for you! how some deity, whose hand is heavy on you, has sent you troubles beyond all other mortals! But I see our lord and master


ἀλλ' εἰσορῶ γὰρ τοῦδε δεσπότου δέμαςAlas for you! how some deity, whose hand is heavy on you, has sent you troubles beyond all other mortals! But I see our lord and master


̓Αγαμέμνονος, τοὐνθένδε σιγῶμεν, φίλαι.Agamemnon; so let us be still from now on, my friends. Agamemnon enters. Agamemnon


̔Εκάβη, τί μέλλεις παῖδα σὴν κρύπτειν τάφῳAGA. Why, Hecuba, delayest thou to come, and bury thy girl in her tomb, agreeably to what Talthybius told me, that no one of the Argives should be suffered to touch thy daughter. For our part we leave her alone, and touch her not; but thou art slow, whereat I am astonished. I am come therefore to fetch thee, for every thing there has been well and duly performed, if aught of well there be in this. Ah! what corse is this I see before the tent? some Trojan's too? for that it is no Grecian's, the robes that vest his limbs inform me. HEC. (aside) Thou ill-starr'd wretch! myself I mean, when I say "thou." O Hecuba, what shall I do? Shall I fall at the knees of Agamemnon here, or bear my ills in silence? AGA. Why dost lament turning thy back upon me, and sayest not what has happened? Who is this?


̔Εκάβη, τί μέλλεις παῖδα σὴν κρύπτειν τάφῳHecuba, why are you delaying to come and bury your daughter? for it was for this that Talthybius brought me your message begging that no one of the Argives should touch your child. And so we granted this, and are not touching her


ἐλθοῦς', ἐφ' οἷσπερ Ταλθύβιος ἤγγειλέ μοιHecuba, why are you delaying to come and bury your daughter? for it was for this that Talthybius brought me your message begging that no one of the Argives should touch your child. And so we granted this, and are not touching her


μὴ θιγγάνειν σῆς μηδέν' ̓Αργείων κόρης;Hecuba, why are you delaying to come and bury your daughter? for it was for this that Talthybius brought me your message begging that no one of the Argives should touch your child. And so we granted this, and are not touching her


ἡμεῖς μὲν οὖν εἰῶμεν οὐδ' ἐψαύομεν:Hecuba, why are you delaying to come and bury your daughter? for it was for this that Talthybius brought me your message begging that no one of the Argives should touch your child. And so we granted this, and are not touching her


σὺ δὲ σχολάζεις, ὥστε θαυμάζειν ἐμέ.but this delay of yours fills me with wonder. And so I have come to send you from here; for our part there is well performed—if here there is any place for well.


ἥκω δ' ἀποστελῶν σε: τἀκεῖθεν γὰρ εὖbut this delay of yours fills me with wonder. And so I have come to send you from here; for our part there is well performed—if here there is any place for well.


πεπραγμέν' ἐστίν — εἴ τι τῶνδ' ἐστὶν καλῶς.but this delay of yours fills me with wonder. And so I have come to send you from here; for our part there is well performed—if here there is any place for well.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Euripides, Alcestis, 426-429, 611-612, 614-635, 743-744, 862-863, 866-867, 869-871, 897-902, 911, 916-919, 922, 926-928, 425 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

425. Ho! sirrahs, catch me this woman; hold her fast; for ’tis no welcome story she will have to hear. It was to make thee leave the holy altar of the goddess that I held thy child’s death before thy eyes, and so induced thee to give thyself up to me to die.
2. Euripides, Andromache, 1117-1172, 1176, 1187, 1211, 1218, 1226-1242, 1263-1270, 1116 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1116. εἷς ἦν ἁπάντων τῶνδε μηχανορράφος.
3. Euripides, Bacchae, 1217-1226, 1285, 1300-1329, 1216 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1216. ἕπεσθέ μοι φέροντες ἄθλιον βάρος 1216. Follow me, carrying the miserable burden of Pentheus, follow me, slaves, before the house; exhausted from countless searches, I am bringing his body, for I discovered it in the folds of Kithairon
4. Euripides, Electra, 1277-1280, 1276 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1276. σοὶ μὲν τάδ' εἶπον: τόνδε δ' Αἰγίσθου νέκυν
5. Euripides, Hecuba, 1076-1078, 1287-1288, 25-50, 610, 616, 675, 678-680, 685-732, 736-805, 894-897, 1075 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1075. ἀρνύμενος λώβαν 1075. λύμας ἀντίποιν' ἐμᾶς; ὦ τάλας. 1075. in requital of their outrage on me? Ah, woe is me! where am I rushing, leaving my children unguarded for maenads of hell to mangle, to be murdered and ruthlessly cast forth upon the hills, a feast of blood for dogs?
6. Euripides, Helen, 1243, 1260, 1291-1300, 1390-1395, 1400, 1408, 1419, 1528, 1542-1604, 1240 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1240. τί δ'; ἔστ' ἀπόντων τύμβος; ἢ θάψεις σκιάν; 1240. What? Is there a tomb for the absent? Or will you bury a shadow? Helen
7. Euripides, Children of Heracles, 1027-1045, 1159-1162, 1026 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1026. rend= Bury my body after death in its destined grave in front of the shrine of the virgin goddess Pallas. at Pallene. And I will be thy friend and guardian of thy city for ever, where I lie buried in a foreign soil, but a bitter foe to these children’s descendants, whensoe’er Referring to invasions by the Peloponnesians, descendants of the Heracleidae. with gathered host they come against this land, traitors to your kindness now; such are the strangers ye have championed. Why then came I hither, if I knew all this, instead of regarding the god’s oracle? Because I thought, that Hera was mightier far than any oracle, and would not betray me. Waste no drink-offering on my tomb, nor spill the victim’s blood; for I will requite them for my treatment here with a journey they shall rue; and ye shall have double gain from me, for I will help you and harm them by my death. Alcmena 1026. Slay me, I do not ask thee for mercy; yet since this city let me go and shrunk from slaying me, I will reward it with an old oracle of Loxias, which in time will benefit them more than doth appear.
8. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1359-1366, 1358 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Medea, 1378-1383, 1377 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1377. Give up to me those dead, to bury and lament Medea
10. Euripides, Orestes, 1431-1436, 97-99, 114 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1486-1529, 1485 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1485. I do not veil my tender cheek shaded with curls, nor do I feel shame, from maiden modesty, at the dark red beneath my eyes, the blush upon my face, as I hurry on, in bacchic revelry for the dead
12. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 755-759, 778-836, 841-843, 846-931, 934-935, 950-954, 754 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

754. Are ye bringing the bodies, for the which the strife arose? Messenger
13. Euripides, Trojan Women, 1134-1146, 1156-1206, 1240-1245, 1248-1250, 735-739, 1133 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus, afterlife beliefs in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 604
aetiology Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
afterlife, punishment in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 604
afterlife, reward in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 604
afterlife Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 604
alcestis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
andromache Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
athens Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
characters, minor Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 917
children of heracles (heraclidae) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834, 917
delphi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
eidôla, as prologues Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
eidôla, in tragedy Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
eidôla Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
erinyes Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 604
euripides, eidôla Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
family Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 57
funerals Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
helen Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834, 917
hera Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
heracles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
hopelessness, and loss of faith in the gods Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 57
iphigenia in tauris Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
kyriakou, p. xxii Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 917
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
mêchanê Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
nomos Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
pindar, afterlife beliefs in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 604
rehm, r. xxv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
revenge, hopelessness feeding a passion for revenge Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 57
ritual Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
rohde, e. Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
theron of acragas Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 604
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
weddings' Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
women Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 57