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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5621
Euripides, Hecuba, 1267


ὁ Θρῃξὶ μάντις εἶπε Διόνυσος τάδε.Dionysus, our Thracian prophet, told me so. Hecuba


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

27 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 1 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1. Pierian Muses, with your songs of praise
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 53 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

53. Good things to all, and then of Zeus they sing
3. Homeric Hymns, To Hermes, 534-538, 533 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

533. You’re prized and trusted. I’ll give you to hold
4. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 62-63, 61 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

61. αὐτῷ μελέσθω Λοξίᾳ μεγασθενεῖ.
5. Aristophanes, Frogs, 873 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

873. ἀγῶνα κρῖναι τόνδε μουσικώτατα:
6. Euripides, Alcestis, 1001-1005, 1008-1014, 1050, 1096, 1115-1118, 1121, 1124, 1127-1129, 1133-1134, 1143-1146, 995-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Bacchae, 299-301, 410, 630-631, 298 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Euripides, Fragments, 650, 1110 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Hecuba, 10, 1076-1080, 11, 1114-1119, 1131-1182, 1187-1199, 12, 1200-1207, 1217-1237, 1240-1251, 1253-1255, 1258-1266, 1268-1274, 1279, 1287-1288, 1292, 13-19, 2, 20-29, 3, 30, 309, 31, 310-312, 32, 328-329, 33, 330-331, 34-39, 4, 40-49, 5, 50-59, 6, 661, 669, 675, 7, 714-715, 726-727, 736-799, 8, 800-899, 9, 900-904, 919, 923-925, 934, 946-949, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. ̔́Ηκω νεκρῶν κευθμῶνα καὶ σκότου πύλας 1. I have come from out of the charnel-house and gates of gloom, where Hades dwells apart from gods, I Polydorus, a son of Hecuba, the daughter of Cisseus, and of Priam. Now my father, when Phrygia ’s capital
10. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1332-1335, 1331 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1423-1430, 1419 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 711, 1128 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Euripides, Medea, 1195-1230, 1234-1254, 1260-1261, 1271-1292, 1317-1414, 980-981, 1194 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Euripides, Rhesus, 971-973, 970 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

970. Alone for ever, in a caverned place
15. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 29-31, 479, 28 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Euripides, Trojan Women, 299-305, 308-310, 320-325, 327-328, 332-333, 342-352, 298 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17. Herodotus, Histories, 7.111 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7.111. The Satrae, as far as we know, have never yet been subject to any man; they alone of the Thracians have continued living in freedom to this day; they dwell on high mountains covered with forests of all kinds and snow, and they are excellent warriors. ,It is they who possess the place of divination sacred to Dionysus. This place is in their highest mountains; the Bessi, a clan of the Satrae, are the prophets of the shrine; there is a priestess who utters the oracle, as at Delphi; it is no more complicated here than there.
18. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

22b. and the rest, thinking that there I should prove by actual test that I was less learned than they. So, taking up the poems of theirs that seemed to me to have been most carefully elaborated by them, I asked them what they meant, that I might at the same time learn something from them. Now I am ashamed to tell you the truth, gentlemen; but still it must be told. For there was hardly a man present, one might say, who would not speak better than they about the poems they themselves had composed. So again in the case of the poets also I presently recognized this
19. Plato, Ion, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

534b. in certain gardens and glades of the Muses—like the bees, and winging the air as these do. And what they tell is true. For a poet is a light and winged and sacred thing, and is unable ever to indite until he has been inspired and put out of his senses, and his mind is no longer in him: every man, whilst he retains possession of that, is powerless to indite a verse or chant an oracle. Seeing then that it is not by art that they compose and utter so many fine things about the deeds of men—
20. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

244c. otherwise they would not have connected the very word mania with the noblest of arts, that which foretells the future, by calling it the manic art. No, they gave this name thinking that mania, when it comes by gift of the gods, is a noble thing, but nowadays people call prophecy the mantic art, tastelessly inserting a T in the word. So also, when they gave a name to the investigation of the future which rational persons conduct through observation of birds and by other signs, since they furnish mind (nous)
21. Plato, Symposium, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

218b. a Pausanias, an Aristodemus, and an Aristophanes—I need not mention Socrates himself—and all the rest of them; every one of you has had his share of philosophic frenzy and transport, so all of you shall hear. You shall stand up alike for what then was done and for what now is spoken. But the domestics, and all else profane and clownish, must clap the heaviest of doors upon their ears.
22. Sophocles, Antigone, 965 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

23. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 11.50-11.60 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

24. Vergil, Georgics, 4.520-4.527 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.520. To bristly boar, fell tigress, dragon scaled 4.521. And tawny-tufted lioness, or send forth 4.522. A crackling sound of fire, and so shake of 4.523. The fetters, or in showery drops anon 4.524. Dissolve and vanish. But the more he shift 4.525. His endless transformations, thou, my son 4.526. More straitlier clench the clinging bands, until 4.527. His body's shape return to that thou sawest
25. Suetonius, Augustus, 94.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

26. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 51.25.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

51.25.5.  These he spared because they are attached to the service of Dionysus, and had come to meet him on this occasion without their arms; and he also granted them the land in which they magnify the god, taking it away from the Bessi who were occupying it.
27. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 4.14 (2nd cent. CE

4.14. He also visited in passing the Adyton of Orpheus when he had put in at Lesbos. And they tell that it was here that Orpheus once on a time loved to prophesy, before Apollo had turned his attention to him. For when the latter found that men no longer flocked to Gryneium for the sake of oracles nor to Clarus nor (to Delphi) where is the tripod of Apollo, and that Orpheus was the only oracle, his head having come from Thrace, he presented himself before the giver of oracles and said: Cease to meddle with my affairs, for I have already put up long enough with your vaticinations.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aegisthus Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 134
aeschylus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 95
alcestis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 835
apollo Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 72
aristophanes, frogs Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 95
aristotle, rhetoric Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 598
artemis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 835
athena Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 835
athens Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 835
authority Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 132
bassarids Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 72
behaviour Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 134
cassandra Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 134
character, tragic Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 136
characters Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 598
charis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 598
cult, in euripides Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 136
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 31, 95
cyclops Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 598
cyrus the great Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 72
delphi Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 72
demeter Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 835
dionysus, and light (lightning) and thunder Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 95
dionysus, effeminate/effeminacy of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 31
dionysus, mantic abilities of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 31, 95
dionysus, relation with the muses Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 31, 95
eidôla, as prologues Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
eidôla, in tragedy Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
eidôla Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
eikos Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 598
electra Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 134
eleusis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 835
epiphany, tragic Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 136
euripides, bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 95
euripides, eidôla Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
euripides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 95
funerals Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 835
gorgias, encomium of helen Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 598
hecuba Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 134
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 177
helen Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 835
heracles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 835
hippolytus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 835
hopelessness, and dehumanization Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 59, 60
hopelessness, and loss of faith in the gods Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 59, 60
initiands/initiates/initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 95
interrogation (-scene) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 31
iphigenia in tauris Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 835
jesus christ Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 95
law Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 134
lesbos Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 72
lycurgus, and pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 95
lycurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 31
madness (mania)/frenzy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 95
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 835
muses Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 31, 95
nomos Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 134
nurses of dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 31, 95
odysseus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 72; Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 134
orestes Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 134
orpheus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 72; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 31, 95
osullivan, p. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 598
pain (mental and physical) Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 59, 60
palace Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 72
pelop Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 134
polydoros Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 134
polymestor Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 134
polyxena Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 134
prophecy Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 132, 136
punishment Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 134
rehm, r. xxv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 835
resemblances, edonoi' Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 31
resemblances Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 95
revenge, hopelessness feeding a passion for revenge Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 59, 60
revenge Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 134
rhetoric Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 598
ritual Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 835
rohde, e. Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 158
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 598, 835
teiresias Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 31, 95
thrace Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 72; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 31, 95
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 598, 835
tzanetou, a. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 177
values, moral Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 134
weddings Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 835
with Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 134
women Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 59, 60