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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5620
Euripides, Fragments, 953
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

24 results
1. Aristophanes, Birds, 975-989, 974 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

974. ἔνεστι καὶ τὰ πέδιλα; λαβὲ τὸ βιβλίον.
2. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 2, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1. ἀλλ' εἴ τις ἐς Βακχεῖον αὐτὰς ἐκάλεσεν
3. Euripides, Alcestis, 358-362, 962-971, 357 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Bacchae, 470 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

470. ὁρῶν ὁρῶντα, καὶ δίδωσιν ὄργια. Πενθεύς 470. Seeing me just as I saw him, he gave me sacred rites. Pentheu
5. Euripides, Fragments, 949-952, 954-957, 948 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Euripides, Hippolytus, 619-624, 73-87, 948-957, 618 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Ion, 150 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

150. with hands from all defilement free. Oh may I never cease thus to serve Phoebus, or, if I do, may fortune smile upon me!
8. Euripides, Rhesus, 942-945, 941 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

941. Is hid from me! Yet ever on thy land
9. Herodotus, Histories, 4.79 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4.79. But when things had to turn out badly for him, they did so for this reason: he conceived a desire to be initiated into the rites of the Bacchic Dionysus; and when he was about to begin the sacred mysteries, he saw the greatest vision. ,He had in the city of the Borysthenites a spacious house, grand and costly (the same house I just mentioned), all surrounded by sphinxes and griffins worked in white marble; this house was struck by a thunderbolt. And though the house burnt to the ground, Scyles none the less performed the rite to the end. ,Now the Scythians reproach the Greeks for this Bacchic revelling, saying that it is not reasonable to set up a god who leads men to madness. ,So when Scyles had been initiated into the Bacchic rite, some one of the Borysthenites scoffed at the Scythians: “You laugh at us, Scythians, because we play the Bacchant and the god possesses us; but now this deity has possessed your own king, so that he plays the Bacchant and is maddened by the god. If you will not believe me, follow me now and I will show him to you.” ,The leading men among the Scythians followed him, and the Borysthenite brought them up secretly onto a tower; from which, when Scyles passed by with his company of worshippers, they saw him playing the Bacchant; thinking it a great misfortune, they left the city and told the whole army what they had seen.
10. Isocrates, Orations, 19.5-19.6 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Plato, Cratylus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

400c. ign ( σῆμα ). But I think it most likely that the Orphic poets gave this name, with the idea that the soul is undergoing punishment for something; they think it has the body as an enclosure to keep it safe, like a prison, and this is, as the name itself denotes, the safe ( σῶμα ) for the soul, until the penalty is paid, and not even a letter needs to be changed.
12. Plato, Euthyphro, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6b. Euthyphro. Yes, and still more wonderful things than these, Socrates, which most people do not know. Socrates. And so you believe that there was really war between the gods, and fearful enmities and battles and other things of the sort, such as are told of by the poets and represented in varied design
13. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

493a. and we really, it may be, are dead; in fact I once heard sages say that we are now dead, and the body is our tomb, and the part of the soul in which we have desires is liable to be over-persuaded and to vacillate to and fro, and so some smart fellow, a Sicilian, I daresay, or Italian, made a fable in which—by a play of words—he named this part, as being so impressionable and persuadable, a jar, and the thoughtless he called uninitiate:
14. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

815c. All the dancing that is of a Bacchic kind and cultivated by those who indulge in drunken imitations of Pans, Sileni and Satyrs (as they call them), when performing certain rites of expiation and initiation,—all this class of dancing cannot easily be defined either as pacific or as warlike, or as of any one distinct kind. The most correct way of defining it seems to me to be this—
15. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

16. Demosthenes, Orations, 19.199 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

17. Theophrastus, Characters, 16.12 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

18. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.92.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.92.3.  For this reason they insist that Orpheus, having visited Egypt in ancient times and witnessed this custom, merely invented his account of Hades, in part reproducing this practice and in part inventing on his own account; but this point we shall discuss more fully a little later.
19. Livy, History, 39.8.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

20. Plutarch, Oracles At Delphi No Longer Given In Verse, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 8.37.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8.37.5. By the image of the Mistress stands Anytus, represented as a man in armour. Those about the sanctuary say that the Mistress was brought up by Anytus, who was one of the Titans, as they are called. The first to introduce Titans into poetry was Homer, See Hom. Il. 14.279 . representing them as gods down in what is called Tartarus; the lines are in the passage about Hera's oath. From Homer the name of the Titans was taken by Onomacritus, who in the orgies he composed for Dionysus made the Titans the authors of the god's sufferings.
22. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 10.4 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10.4. They are followed by Posidonius the Stoic and his school, and Nicolaus and Sotion in the twelfth book of his work entitled Dioclean Refutations, consisting of twenty-four books; also by Dionysius of Halicarnassus. They allege that he used to go round with his mother to cottages and read charms, and assist his father in his school for a pitiful fee; further, that one of his brothers was a pander and lived with Leontion the courtesan; that he put forward as his own the doctrines of Democritus about atoms and of Aristippus about pleasure; that he was not a genuine Athenian citizen, a charge brought by Timocrates and by Herodotus in a book On the Training of Epicurus as a Cadet; that he basely flattered Mithras, the minister of Lysimachus, bestowing on him in his letters Apollo's titles of Healer and Lord.
23. Epigraphy, Seg, 28.1245

24. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 627, 1



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ancestors, wicked (incl. titans) Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 145
argonauts de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 9
asclepius de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 9
bacchanalia affair Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 145
bricoleur, bricolage Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 70
childbirth Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 169
chrêsmologos Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 222
comedy, colloquial language Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 63
cults, mysteries Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 63
demeter de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 9
denigration, based on upbringing Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 63
derveni papyri Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 222
derveni papyrus Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 174
dillery, john Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 222
dionysus, as releaser Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 145
divides year with apollo? and women Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
divides year with apollo? iconographic retinue Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
divides year with apollo? private rites for Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
divination, and authority Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 222
divination, metrics of Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 222
egypt, egyptian Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 174
exegesis de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 9
families, aeschines Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 63
fontenrose, joseph Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 222
hades, place de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 9
hexameter de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 9
hieros (sacred) Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 63
hippolytus Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 145
initiates de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 9
initiations (private cults) Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
inspiration (see also divination, trance, and mania) Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 222
isocrates Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 222
katabasis, orphic Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 174
katharos (purity) derivation Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 63
language Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 63
maenads Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
mania Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 222
mother elective cults of Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
musaeus Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 70, 145
music de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 9
oaths, aeschines Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 63
onomacritus Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 70
oracles, delphi de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 9
orality de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 9
orpheotelestai Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 70, 145
orpheus, as argonaut Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 174
orpheus, as founder of mysteries and religious reformer Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 70, 145
orpheus, see also katabasis, orphic orpheus of camarina Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 174
orpheus, visits the underworld Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 174
orphic, see hieros logos de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 9
persephone de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 9
plato Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 222
polemaenetus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 222
purity, purification Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 145
religion, marginal status Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 63
sabazius Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
scyles Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 70
socrates Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 222
struck, peter t. Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 222
symmachus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 222
theseus Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 70, 145, 174
thrace de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 9
thrasyllus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 222
tragedy, abstinence Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 171
tragedy de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 9
tsantsanoglou, k. Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 222
uranism Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 171
vegetarianism Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 145
virginity, of religious cults Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 169
virginity, of tragic characters Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 171
women and dionysus Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
women private festivals of Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
wool, worked for athena by parthenoi and dionysus Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
wool, worked for athena by parthenoi private festivals of' Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325