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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5617
Euripides, Electra, 1255-1291


πρόσπτυξον: εἵρξει γάρ νιν ἐπτοημέναςfor she will prevent them, flickering with dreadful serpents, from touching you, as she stretches over your head her Gorgon-faced shield. There is a hill of Ares, where the gods first sat over their votes to decide on bloodshed


δεινοῖς δράκουσιν ὥστε μὴ ψαύειν σέθενfor she will prevent them, flickering with dreadful serpents, from touching you, as she stretches over your head her Gorgon-faced shield. There is a hill of Ares, where the gods first sat over their votes to decide on bloodshed


γοργῶφ' ὑπερτείνουσα σῷ κάρᾳ κύκλον.for she will prevent them, flickering with dreadful serpents, from touching you, as she stretches over your head her Gorgon-faced shield. There is a hill of Ares, where the gods first sat over their votes to decide on bloodshed


ἔστιν δ' ̓́Αρεώς τις ὄχθος, οὗ πρῶτον θεοὶfor she will prevent them, flickering with dreadful serpents, from touching you, as she stretches over your head her Gorgon-faced shield. There is a hill of Ares, where the gods first sat over their votes to decide on bloodshed


ἕζοντ' ἐπὶ ψήφοισιν αἵματος πέριfor she will prevent them, flickering with dreadful serpents, from touching you, as she stretches over your head her Gorgon-faced shield. There is a hill of Ares, where the gods first sat over their votes to decide on bloodshed


̔Αλιρρόθιον ὅτ' ἔκταν' ὠμόφρων ̓́Αρηςwhen savage Ares killed Halirrothius, son of the ocean’s ruler, in anger for the unholy violation of his daughter, so that the tribunal is most sacred and secure in the eyes of the gods.


μῆνιν θυγατρὸς ἀνοσίων νυμφευμάτωνwhen savage Ares killed Halirrothius, son of the ocean’s ruler, in anger for the unholy violation of his daughter, so that the tribunal is most sacred and secure in the eyes of the gods.


πόντου κρέοντος παῖδ', ἵν' εὐσεβεστάτηwhen savage Ares killed Halirrothius, son of the ocean’s ruler, in anger for the unholy violation of his daughter, so that the tribunal is most sacred and secure in the eyes of the gods.


ψῆφος βεβαία τ' ἐστὶν † ἔκ τε τοῦ † θεοῖς.when savage Ares killed Halirrothius, son of the ocean’s ruler, in anger for the unholy violation of his daughter, so that the tribunal is most sacred and secure in the eyes of the gods.


ἐνταῦθα καὶ σὲ δεῖ δραμεῖν φόνου πέρι.You also must run your risk here, for murder.


ἴσαι δέ ς' ἐκσῴζουσι μὴ θανεῖν δίκῃAn equal number of votes cast will save you from dying by the verdict; for Loxias will take the blame upon himself, since it was his oracle that advised your mother’s murder. And this law will be set for posterity, that the accused will always win his case if he has equal votes.


ψῆφοι τεθεῖσαι: Λοξίας γὰρ αἰτίανAn equal number of votes cast will save you from dying by the verdict; for Loxias will take the blame upon himself, since it was his oracle that advised your mother’s murder. And this law will be set for posterity, that the accused will always win his case if he has equal votes.


ἐς αὑτὸν οἴσει, μητέρος χρήσας φόνον.An equal number of votes cast will save you from dying by the verdict; for Loxias will take the blame upon himself, since it was his oracle that advised your mother’s murder. And this law will be set for posterity, that the accused will always win his case if he has equal votes.


καὶ τοῖσι λοιποῖς ὅδε νόμος τεθήσεταιAn equal number of votes cast will save you from dying by the verdict; for Loxias will take the blame upon himself, since it was his oracle that advised your mother’s murder. And this law will be set for posterity, that the accused will always win his case if he has equal votes.


νικᾶν ἴσαις ψήφοισι τὸν φεύγοντ' ἀεί.An equal number of votes cast will save you from dying by the verdict; for Loxias will take the blame upon himself, since it was his oracle that advised your mother’s murder. And this law will be set for posterity, that the accused will always win his case if he has equal votes.


δειναὶ μὲν οὖν θεαὶ τῷδ' ἄχει πεπληγμέναιThen the dread goddesses, stricken with grief at this, will sink into a cleft of the earth beside this hill, a holy, revered prophetic shrine for mortals. You must found an Arcadian city beside the streams of Alpheus near the sacred enclosure to Lycaean Apollo;


πάγον παρ' αὐτὸν χάσμα δύσονται χθονόςThen the dread goddesses, stricken with grief at this, will sink into a cleft of the earth beside this hill, a holy, revered prophetic shrine for mortals. You must found an Arcadian city beside the streams of Alpheus near the sacred enclosure to Lycaean Apollo;


σεμνὸν βροτοῖσιν εὐσεβὲς χρηστήριον:Then the dread goddesses, stricken with grief at this, will sink into a cleft of the earth beside this hill, a holy, revered prophetic shrine for mortals. You must found an Arcadian city beside the streams of Alpheus near the sacred enclosure to Lycaean Apollo;


σὲ δ' ̓Αρκάδων χρὴ πόλιν ἐπ' ̓Αλφειοῦ ῥοαῖςThen the dread goddesses, stricken with grief at this, will sink into a cleft of the earth beside this hill, a holy, revered prophetic shrine for mortals. You must found an Arcadian city beside the streams of Alpheus near the sacred enclosure to Lycaean Apollo;


οἰκεῖν Λυκαίου πλησίον σηκώματος:Then the dread goddesses, stricken with grief at this, will sink into a cleft of the earth beside this hill, a holy, revered prophetic shrine for mortals. You must found an Arcadian city beside the streams of Alpheus near the sacred enclosure to Lycaean Apollo;


ἐπώνυμος δὲ σοῦ πόλις κεκλήσεται.and the city will be called after your name. I say this to you. As for this corpse of Aegisthus, the citizens of Argos will cover it in the earth in burial. But as for your mother, Menelaus, who has arrived at Nauplia only now after capturing Troy


σοὶ μὲν τάδ' εἶπον: τόνδε δ' Αἰγίσθου νέκυνand the city will be called after your name. I say this to you. As for this corpse of Aegisthus, the citizens of Argos will cover it in the earth in burial. But as for your mother, Menelaus, who has arrived at Nauplia only now after capturing Troy


̓́Αργους πολῖται γῆς καλύψουσιν τάφῳ.and the city will be called after your name. I say this to you. As for this corpse of Aegisthus, the citizens of Argos will cover it in the earth in burial. But as for your mother, Menelaus, who has arrived at Nauplia only now after capturing Troy


μητέρα δὲ τὴν σὴν ἄρτι Ναυπλίαν παρὼνand the city will be called after your name. I say this to you. As for this corpse of Aegisthus, the citizens of Argos will cover it in the earth in burial. But as for your mother, Menelaus, who has arrived at Nauplia only now after capturing Troy


Μενέλαος, ἐξ οὗ Τρωικὴν εἷλε χθόναand the city will be called after your name. I say this to you. As for this corpse of Aegisthus, the citizens of Argos will cover it in the earth in burial. But as for your mother, Menelaus, who has arrived at Nauplia only now after capturing Troy


̔Ελένη τε θάψει: Πρωτέως γὰρ ἐκ δόμωνwill bury her, with Helen helping him; for she has come from Proteus’ house, leaving Egypt , and she never went to Troy ; Zeus, to stir up strife and bloodshed among mortals, sent a phantom of Helen to Ilium . Now let Pylades, having one who is both a virgin and a married woman


ἥκει λιποῦς' Αἴγυπτον οὐδ' ἦλθεν Φρύγας:will bury her, with Helen helping him; for she has come from Proteus’ house, leaving Egypt , and she never went to Troy ; Zeus, to stir up strife and bloodshed among mortals, sent a phantom of Helen to Ilium . Now let Pylades, having one who is both a virgin and a married woman


Ζεὺς δ', ὡς ἔρις γένοιτο καὶ φόνος βροτῶνwill bury her, with Helen helping him; for she has come from Proteus’ house, leaving Egypt , and she never went to Troy ; Zeus, to stir up strife and bloodshed among mortals, sent a phantom of Helen to Ilium . Now let Pylades, having one who is both a virgin and a married woman


εἴδωλον ̔Ελένης ἐξέπεμψ' ἐς ̓́Ιλιον.will bury her, with Helen helping him; for she has come from Proteus’ house, leaving Egypt , and she never went to Troy ; Zeus, to stir up strife and bloodshed among mortals, sent a phantom of Helen to Ilium . Now let Pylades, having one who is both a virgin and a married woman


Πυλάδης μὲν οὖν κόρην τε καὶ δάμαρτ' ἔχωνwill bury her, with Helen helping him; for she has come from Proteus’ house, leaving Egypt , and she never went to Troy ; Zeus, to stir up strife and bloodshed among mortals, sent a phantom of Helen to Ilium . Now let Pylades, having one who is both a virgin and a married woman


̓Αχαιίδος γῆς οἴκαδ' ἐσπορευέτωgo home from the Achaean land, and let him conduct the one called your brother-in-law to the land of Phocis , and give him a weight of riches. But you set out along the narrow Isthmus, and go to Cecropia’s blessed hill.


καὶ τὸν λόγῳ σὸν πενθερὸν κομιζέτωgo home from the Achaean land, and let him conduct the one called your brother-in-law to the land of Phocis , and give him a weight of riches. But you set out along the narrow Isthmus, and go to Cecropia’s blessed hill.


Φωκέων ἐς αἶαν καὶ δότω πλούτου βάρος:go home from the Achaean land, and let him conduct the one called your brother-in-law to the land of Phocis , and give him a weight of riches. But you set out along the narrow Isthmus, and go to Cecropia’s blessed hill.


σὺ δ' ̓Ισθμίας γῆς αὐχέν' ἐμβαίνω ποδὶgo home from the Achaean land, and let him conduct the one called your brother-in-law to the land of Phocis , and give him a weight of riches. But you set out along the narrow Isthmus, and go to Cecropia’s blessed hill.


χώρει πρὸς ὄχθον Κεκροπίας εὐδαίμονα.go home from the Achaean land, and let him conduct the one called your brother-in-law to the land of Phocis , and give him a weight of riches. But you set out along the narrow Isthmus, and go to Cecropia’s blessed hill.


πεπρωμένην γὰρ μοῖραν ἐκπλήσας φόνουFor once you have completed your appointed lot of murder, you will be happy, freed from these troubles. Choru


εὐδαιμονήσεις τῶνδ' ἀπαλλαχθεὶς πόνων.For once you have completed your appointed lot of murder, you will be happy, freed from these troubles. Choru


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

22 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.661-2.670, 5.655-5.656, 23.30-23.34, 23.166-23.178, 23.679 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.661. /when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people 2.662. /when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people 2.663. /when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people 2.664. /when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people 2.665. /went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; 2.666. /went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; 2.667. /went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; 2.668. /went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; 2.669. /went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; 2.670. /and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus. 5.655. /So spake Sarpedon, and Tlepolemus lifted on high his ashen spear, and the long spears sped from the hands of both at one moment. Sarpedon smote him full upon the neck, and the grievous point passed clean through, and down upon his eyes came the darkness of night and enfolded him. 5.656. /So spake Sarpedon, and Tlepolemus lifted on high his ashen spear, and the long spears sped from the hands of both at one moment. Sarpedon smote him full upon the neck, and the grievous point passed clean through, and down upon his eyes came the darkness of night and enfolded him. 23.30. /Many sleek bulls bellowed about the knife, as they were slaughtered, many sheep and bleating goats, and many white-tusked swine, rich with fat, were stretched to singe over the flame of Hephaestus; and everywhere about the corpse the blood ran so that one might dip cups therein. 23.31. /Many sleek bulls bellowed about the knife, as they were slaughtered, many sheep and bleating goats, and many white-tusked swine, rich with fat, were stretched to singe over the flame of Hephaestus; and everywhere about the corpse the blood ran so that one might dip cups therein. 23.32. /Many sleek bulls bellowed about the knife, as they were slaughtered, many sheep and bleating goats, and many white-tusked swine, rich with fat, were stretched to singe over the flame of Hephaestus; and everywhere about the corpse the blood ran so that one might dip cups therein. 23.33. /Many sleek bulls bellowed about the knife, as they were slaughtered, many sheep and bleating goats, and many white-tusked swine, rich with fat, were stretched to singe over the flame of Hephaestus; and everywhere about the corpse the blood ran so that one might dip cups therein. 23.34. /Many sleek bulls bellowed about the knife, as they were slaughtered, many sheep and bleating goats, and many white-tusked swine, rich with fat, were stretched to singe over the flame of Hephaestus; and everywhere about the corpse the blood ran so that one might dip cups therein. 23.166. /and on the topmost part thereof they set the dead man, their hearts sorrow-laden. And many goodly sheep and many sleek kine of shambling gait they flayed and dressed before the pyre; and from them all great-souled Achilles gathered the fat, and enfolded the dead therein from head to foot, and about him heaped the flayed bodies. 23.167. /and on the topmost part thereof they set the dead man, their hearts sorrow-laden. And many goodly sheep and many sleek kine of shambling gait they flayed and dressed before the pyre; and from them all great-souled Achilles gathered the fat, and enfolded the dead therein from head to foot, and about him heaped the flayed bodies. 23.168. /and on the topmost part thereof they set the dead man, their hearts sorrow-laden. And many goodly sheep and many sleek kine of shambling gait they flayed and dressed before the pyre; and from them all great-souled Achilles gathered the fat, and enfolded the dead therein from head to foot, and about him heaped the flayed bodies. 23.169. /and on the topmost part thereof they set the dead man, their hearts sorrow-laden. And many goodly sheep and many sleek kine of shambling gait they flayed and dressed before the pyre; and from them all great-souled Achilles gathered the fat, and enfolded the dead therein from head to foot, and about him heaped the flayed bodies. 23.170. /And thereon he set two-handled jars of honey and oil, leaning them against the bier; and four horses with high arched neeks he cast swiftly upon the pyre, groaning aloud the while. Nine dogs had the prince, that fed beneath his table, and of these did Achilles cut the throats of twain, and cast them upon the pyre. 23.171. /And thereon he set two-handled jars of honey and oil, leaning them against the bier; and four horses with high arched neeks he cast swiftly upon the pyre, groaning aloud the while. Nine dogs had the prince, that fed beneath his table, and of these did Achilles cut the throats of twain, and cast them upon the pyre. 23.172. /And thereon he set two-handled jars of honey and oil, leaning them against the bier; and four horses with high arched neeks he cast swiftly upon the pyre, groaning aloud the while. Nine dogs had the prince, that fed beneath his table, and of these did Achilles cut the throats of twain, and cast them upon the pyre. 23.173. /And thereon he set two-handled jars of honey and oil, leaning them against the bier; and four horses with high arched neeks he cast swiftly upon the pyre, groaning aloud the while. Nine dogs had the prince, that fed beneath his table, and of these did Achilles cut the throats of twain, and cast them upon the pyre. 23.174. /And thereon he set two-handled jars of honey and oil, leaning them against the bier; and four horses with high arched neeks he cast swiftly upon the pyre, groaning aloud the while. Nine dogs had the prince, that fed beneath his table, and of these did Achilles cut the throats of twain, and cast them upon the pyre. 23.175. /And twelve valiant sons of the great-souled Trojans slew he with the bronze—and grim was the work he purposed in his heart and thereto he set the iron might of fire, to range at large. Then he uttered a groan, and called on his dear comrade by name:Hail, I bid thee, O Patroclus, even in the house of Hades 23.176. /And twelve valiant sons of the great-souled Trojans slew he with the bronze—and grim was the work he purposed in his heart and thereto he set the iron might of fire, to range at large. Then he uttered a groan, and called on his dear comrade by name:Hail, I bid thee, O Patroclus, even in the house of Hades 23.177. /And twelve valiant sons of the great-souled Trojans slew he with the bronze—and grim was the work he purposed in his heart and thereto he set the iron might of fire, to range at large. Then he uttered a groan, and called on his dear comrade by name:Hail, I bid thee, O Patroclus, even in the house of Hades 23.178. /And twelve valiant sons of the great-souled Trojans slew he with the bronze—and grim was the work he purposed in his heart and thereto he set the iron might of fire, to range at large. Then he uttered a groan, and called on his dear comrade by name:Hail, I bid thee, O Patroclus, even in the house of Hades 23.679. /that they may bear him forth when worsted by my hands. So spake he, and they all became hushed in silence. Euryalus alone uprose to face him, a godlike man, son of king Mecisteus, son of Talaus, who on a time had come to Thebes for the burial of Oedipus
2. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1278, 1277 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1277. βωμοῦ πατρῴου δʼ ἀντʼ ἐπίξηνον μένει 1277. She struck with first warm bloody sacrificing!
3. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 1047, 973-974, 1046 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1046. ἐλευθερώσας πᾶσαν Ἀργείων πόλιν
4. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 483, 482 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

482. ἐπεὶ δὲ πρᾶγμα δεῦρʼ ἐπέσκηψεν τόδε
5. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 11.35 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 7.54 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Bacchae, 1021 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1021. γελῶντι προσώπῳ περίβαλε βρόχον
8. Euripides, Electra, 125, 1250-1254, 1256-1259, 126, 1260-1291, 260-261, 511-515, 528-537, 761, 877, 91-92, 124 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

124. Αἰγίσθου τ', ̓Αγάμεμνον.
9. Euripides, Hecuba, 125, 1255, 126, 534-537, 124 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

124. δισσῶν μύθων ῥήτορες ἦσαν:
10. Euripides, Helen, 1644-1679, 1643 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1643. Θεοκλύμενε, γαίας τῆσδ' ἄναξ: δισσοὶ δέ σε
11. Euripides, Children of Heracles, 1027-1036, 1040-1043, 1026 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1026. rend= Bury my body after death in its destined grave in front of the shrine of the virgin goddess Pallas. at Pallene. And I will be thy friend and guardian of thy city for ever, where I lie buried in a foreign soil, but a bitter foe to these children’s descendants, whensoe’er Referring to invasions by the Peloponnesians, descendants of the Heracleidae. with gathered host they come against this land, traitors to your kindness now; such are the strangers ye have championed. Why then came I hither, if I knew all this, instead of regarding the god’s oracle? Because I thought, that Hera was mightier far than any oracle, and would not betray me. Waste no drink-offering on my tomb, nor spill the victim’s blood; for I will requite them for my treatment here with a journey they shall rue; and ye shall have double gain from me, for I will help you and harm them by my death. Alcmena 1026. Slay me, I do not ask thee for mercy; yet since this city let me go and shrunk from slaying me, I will reward it with an old oracle of Loxias, which in time will benefit them more than doth appear.
12. Euripides, Ion, 1570-1594, 1569 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Euripides, Orestes, 1626-1665, 1625 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1625. Appearing in the clouds. Menelaus, calm your anger that has been whetted; I am Phoebus, the son of Leto, drawing near to call you by name. And you also, Orestes, who are keeping guard on the girl, sword in hand, so that you may hear what I have come to say. Helen, whom all your eagerne
14. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 1184-1212, 1183 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1183. Hearken, Theseus, to the words that I Athena utter, telling thee thy duty, which, if thou perform it, will serve thy city.
15. Herodotus, Histories, 4.150-4.153, 5.41 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4.150. So far in the story the Lacedaemonian and Theraean records agree; for the rest, we have only the word of the Theraeans. ,Grinnus son of Aesanius, king of Thera, a descendant of this same Theras, came to Delphi bringing a hecatomb from his city; among others of his people, Battus son of Polymnestus came with him, a descendant of Euphemus of the Minyan clan. ,When Grinnus king of Thera asked the oracle about other matters, the priestess' answer was that he should found a city in Libya. “Lord, I am too old and heavy to stir; command one of these younger men to do this,” answered Grinnus, pointing to Battus as he spoke. ,No more was said then. But when they departed, they neglected to obey the oracle, since they did not know where Libya was, and were afraid to send a colony out to an uncertain destination. 4.151. For seven years after this there was no rain in Thera; all the trees in the island except one withered. The Theraeans inquired at Delphi again, and the priestess mentioned the colony they should send to Libya. ,So, since there was no remedy for their ills, they sent messengers to Crete to find any Cretan or traveller there who had travelled to Libya. In their travels about the island, these came to the town of Itanus, where they met a murex fisherman named Corobius, who told them that he had once been driven off course by winds to Libya, to an island there called Platea. ,They hired this man to come with them to Thera; from there, just a few men were sent aboard ship to spy out the land first; guided by Corobius to the aforesaid island Platea, these left him there with provision for some months, and themselves sailed back with all speed to Thera to bring news of the island. 4.152. But after they had been away for longer than the agreed time, and Corobius had no provisions left, a Samian ship sailing for Egypt, whose captain was Colaeus, was driven off her course to Platea, where the Samians heard the whole story from Corobius and left him provisions for a year; ,they then put out to sea from the island and would have sailed to Egypt, but an easterly wind drove them from their course, and did not abate until they had passed through the Pillars of Heracles and came providentially to Tartessus. ,Now this was at that time an untapped market; hence, the Samians, of all the Greeks whom we know with certainty, brought back from it the greatest profit on their wares except Sostratus of Aegina, son of Laodamas; no one could compete with him. ,The Samians took six talents, a tenth of their profit, and made a bronze vessel with it, like an Argolic cauldron, with griffins' heads projecting from the rim all around; they set this up in their temple of Hera, supporting it with three colossal kneeling figures of bronze, each twelve feet high. ,What the Samians had done was the beginning of a close friendship between them and the men of Cyrene and Thera. 4.153. As for the Theraeans, when they came to Thera after leaving Corobius on the island, they brought word that they had established a settlement on an island off Libya. The Theraeans determined to send out men from their seven regions, taking by lot one of every pair of brothers, and making Battus leader and king of all. Then they manned two fifty-oared ships and sent them to Platea. 5.41. After no long time the second wife gave birth to Cleomenes. She, then, gave the Spartans an heir to the royal power, and as luck would have it, the first wife, who had been barren before, conceived at that very time. ,When the friends of the new wife learned that the other woman was pregt, they began to make trouble for her. They said that she was making an empty boast, so that she might substitute a child. The Ephors were angry, and when her time drew near, they sat around to watch her in childbirth because of their skepticism. ,She gave birth first to Dorieus, then straightway to Leonidas, and right after him to Cleombrotus. Some, however, say that Cleombrotus and Leonidas were twins. As for the later wife, the mother of Cleomenes and the daughter of Prinetadas son of Demarmenus, she bore no more children.
16. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

738b. into no more than 59 sections, these being consecutive from one up to ten. These facts about numbers must be grasped firmly and with deliberate attention by those who are appointed by law to grasp them: they are exactly as we have stated them, and the reason for stating them when founding a State is this:—in respect of gods, and shrines, and the temples which have to be set up for the various gods in the State, and the gods and daemons they are to be named after, no man of sense,—whether he be framing a new State or reforming an old one that has been corrupted,—will attempt to alter
17. Sophocles, Electra, 1509-1510, 1508 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.102.5-2.102.6 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.102.5. The islands in question are uninhabited and of no great size. There is also a story that Alcmaeon, son of Amphiaraus, during his wanderings after the murder of his mother was bidden by Apollo to inhabit this spot, through an oracle which intimated that he would have no release from his terrors until he should find a country to dwell in which had not been seen by the sun; or existed as land at the time he slew his mother; all else being to him polluted ground. 2.102.6. Perplexed at this, the story goes on to say, he at last observed this deposit of the Achelous, and considered that a place sufficient to support life upon, might have been thrown up during the long interval that had elapsed since the death of his mother and the beginning of his wanderings. Settling, therefore, in the district round Oeniadae, he founded a dominion, and left the country its name from his son Acar. Such is the story we have received concerning Alcmaeon.
19. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 2.8.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.8.2. ἀπολομένου δὲ Εὐρυσθέως ἐπὶ Πελοπόννησον ἦλθον οἱ Ἡρακλεῖδαι, καὶ πάσας εἷλον τὰς πόλεις. ἐνιαυτοῦ δὲ αὐτοῖς ἐν τῇ καθόδῳ διαγενομένου φθορὰ 1 -- πᾶσαν Πελοπόννησον κατέσχε, καὶ ταύτην γενέσθαι χρησμὸς διὰ τοὺς Ἡρακλείδας ἐδήλου· πρὸ γὰρ τοῦ δέοντος αὐτοὺς κατελθεῖν. ὅθεν ἀπολιπόντες Πελοπόννησον ἀνεχώρησαν 2 -- εἰς Μαραθῶνα κἀκεῖ κατῴκουν. Τληπόλεμος οὖν κτείνας οὐχ ἑκὼν Λικύμνιον (τῇ βακτηρίᾳ γὰρ αὐτοῦ θεράποντα 3 -- πλήσσοντος ὑπέδραμε) πρὶν ἐξελθεῖν αὐτοὺς 4 -- ἐκ Πελοποννήσου, φεύγων μετʼ οὐκ ὀλίγων ἧκεν εἰς Ῥόδον, κἀκεῖ κατῴκει. Ὕλλος δὲ τὴν μὲν Ἰόλην κατὰ τὰς τοῦ πατρὸς ἐντολὰς 5 -- ἔγημε, τὴν δὲ κάθοδον ἐζήτει τοῖς Ἡρακλείδαις κατεργάσασθαι. διὸ παραγενόμενος εἰς Δελφοὺς ἐπυνθάνετο πῶς ἂν κατέλθοιεν. ὁ δὲ θεὸς ἔφησε 6 -- περιμείναντας τὸν τρίτον καρπὸν κατέρχεσθαι. νομίσας δὲ Ὕλλος τρίτον καρπὸν λέγεσθαι τὴν τριετίαν, τοσοῦτον περιμείνας χρόνον σὺν τῷ στρατῷ κατῄει τοῦ Ἡρακλέους 7 -- ἐπὶ Πελοπόννησον, Τισαμενοῦ τοῦ Ὀρέστου βασιλεύοντος Πελοποννησίων. καὶ γενομένης πάλιν μάχης νικῶσι Πελοποννήσιοι καὶ Ἀριστόμαχος θνήσκει. ἐπεὶ δὲ ἠνδρώθησαν οἱ Κλεοδαίου 1 -- παῖδες, ἐχρῶντο περὶ καθόδου. τοῦ θεοῦ δὲ εἰπόντος ὅ τι καὶ τὸ πρότερον, Τήμενος ᾐτιᾶτο λέγων τούτῳ πεισθέντας 2 -- ἀτυχῆσαι. ὁ δὲ θεὸς ἀνεῖλε τῶν ἀτυχημάτων αὐτοὺς αἰτίους εἶναι· τοὺς γὰρ χρησμοὺς οὐ συμβάλλειν. λέγειν γὰρ οὐ γῆς ἀλλὰ γενεᾶς καρπὸν τρίτον, καὶ στενυγρὰν τὴν εὐρυγάστορα, δεξιὰν κατὰ τὸν Ἰσθμὸν ἔχοντι τὴν θάλασσαν. 3 -- ταῦτα Τήμενος ἀκούσας ἡτοίμαζε τὸν στρατόν, καὶ ναῦς ἐπήξατο 1 -- τῆς Λοκρίδος ἔνθα νῦν ἀπʼ ἐκείνου ὁ τόπος Ναύπακτος λέγεται. ἐκεῖ δʼ ὄντος τοῦ στρατεύματος Ἀριστόδημος κεραυνωθεὶς ἀπέθανε, παῖδας καταλιπὼν ἐξ Ἀργείας τῆς Αὐτεσίωνος διδύμους, Εὐρυσθένη καὶ Προκλέα.
20. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 36.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

21. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.28.7, 9.34.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.28.7. Within the precincts is a monument to Oedipus, whose bones, after diligent inquiry, I found were brought from Thebes . The account of the death of Oedipus in the drama of Sophocles I am prevented from believing by Homer, who says that after the death of Oedipus Mecisteus came to Thebes and took part in the funeral games. 9.34.1. Before reaching Coroneia from Alalcomenae we come to the sanctuary of Itonian Athena. It is named after Itonius the son of Amphictyon, and here the Boeotians gather for their general assembly. In the temple are bronze images of Itonian Athena and Zeus; the artist was Agoracritus, pupil and loved one of Pheidias. In my time they dedicated too images of the Graces.
22. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 6.4 (2nd cent. CE

6.4. Under his guidance, they say, they went on to the sacred enclosure of Memnon, of whom Damis gives the following account. He says that he was the son of the Dawn, and that he did not meet his death in Troy, where indeed he never went; but that he died in Ethiopia after ruling the land for five generations. But his countrymen being the longest lived of men, still mourn him as a mere youth and deplore his untimely death. But the place in which his statue is set up resembles, they tell us, an ancient market-place, such as remain in cities that were long ago inhabited, and where we come on broken stumps and fragments of columns, and find traces of walls as well as seats and jambs of doors, and images of Hermes, some destroyed by the hand of man, others by that of time. Now this statue, says Damis, was turned towards the sunrise, and was that of a youth still unbearded; and it was made of a black stone, and the two feet were joined together after the style in which statues were made in the time of Daedalus; and the arms of the figure were perpendicular to the seat pressing upon it, for though the figure was still sitting it was represented in the very act of rising up. We hear much of this attitude of the statue, and of the expression of its eyes, and of how the lips seem about to speak; but they say that they had no opportunity of admiring these effects until they saw them realized; for when the sun's rays fell upon the statue, and this happened exactly at dawn, they could not restrain their admiration; for the lips spoke immediately the sun's ray touched them, and the eyes seemed to stand out and gleam against the light as do those of men who love to bask in the sun. Then they say they understood that the figure was of one in the act of rising and making obeisance to the sun, in the way those do who worship the powers above standing erect. They accordingly offered a sacrifice to the Sun of Ethiopia and to Memnon of the Dawn, for this the priests recommended them to do, explaining that one name was derived from the words signifying to burn and be warm [ 1] and the other from his mother. Having done this they set out upon camels for the home of the naked philosophers.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achaeans Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
achaeus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
achelous, river Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
achilles Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 255
acropolis, and the tomb of oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
acropolis, athens Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
aeschylus, different from sophocles Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 265
aetiology Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
akhaia, akhaians (epic, also atreids), city foundations Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 240
alcmeon, mythic family of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
altar, of amphilochus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
amphiarus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
amphilochus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
animal species, boar Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 255
animal species, dog Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 255
animal victim, treatment of burning of entire victim Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 255
apoikia (settlement abroad, colony), oracles at Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 240
apoikia (settlement abroad, colony), story type of archaic Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 240
apollo Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
apollo pythios (delphi), and colonization Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 240
apotropaia Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
arcadia Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
areopagus, athens Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
argos, amphilochian Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
argos Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
athena, athena polias Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
athena Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
athens, and myths Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
athens Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
audience, theatrical Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
audience Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
blindness Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
blood, use in the cult of the dead Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 255
blood rituals Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 255
chorus, antigone, electra Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 265
chorus, antigone, in danger and safe Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 265
chorus, antigone, part of 'the large group'" Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 265
clytemnestra Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
coinage, argive in dodekanese and s. asia minor Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 240
coinage, of rhodes Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 240
colonus (kolonos hippeios), and oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
comedy as source of sacrificial rituals Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 255
cult Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
dead, cult ofthe dead Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 255
dead, offerings to the dead Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 255
death, of oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
delphi Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
destruction of animal victim by fire Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 255
dionysus Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
dorian Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
dorus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
electra, chorus Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 265
electra, civic community Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 265
electra (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
electra constructing a family, house Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 265
eleusis Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
epiphany, passim – meaning, exclusive, epilogue epiphany Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
erechtheum Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
erechtheus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
erechtheïds / hyacinthids Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
euripides, bacchae Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
euripides, different from sophocles Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 265
eurystheus Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 255
families, great tragic Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
gaze, of cult images Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
geography, and myth Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
grave Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 255
groups, and individuals Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 265
groups, threatened and safe Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 265
hagnon , hair Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 255
hekabe Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 255
hekate Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 255
helen Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
hermione Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
hero Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
heroes, tragic Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
iconographical representations of sacrifice Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 255
insular Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 240
ionia Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
irony Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
islands, in the aegean Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 240
lenaea vases Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
lifeworld, lifeworld experience Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
likymnios (herakleid from argos) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 240
madness, caused by statues gaze Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
masks, theatrical Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
menelaus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
myths, and sophocles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
neoptolemus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
nostoi traditions, clustering in akhaia (s. italy) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 240
nostoi traditions, in the east Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 240
oedipus, mythic family of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
oedipus at colonus (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
oedipus the king (sophocles), oedipus in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
orestes, madness and hikesia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 240
orestes, mythic family of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
orestes Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
orestheion Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
pausanias, on oedipuss death Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
perseus, hero Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 240
perspective Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 265
polis Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 265
polyxena Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 255
poseidon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
proitos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 240
prophecy, foretelling the future Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
pylades Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
rhodes Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 240
sanctuary, of amphiarus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
sight, power of, of divine images Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
statues, and viewers Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
thebes, and oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
thebes (boeotia) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
theseus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
thucydides (politician), on amphilochian argos Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
tlepolemos (herakleid) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 240
tomb, of oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 124
tragedy as source of sacrificial rituals' Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 255
troy, heroes fallen at troy Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 255
venerable ones Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 95
viewers Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176