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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5623
Euripides, Children Of Heracles, 613


τὸν μὲν ἀφ' ὑψηλῶν βραχὺν ᾤκισεrend= nor doth the same house for ever tread the path of bliss; for one kind of fortune follows hard upon another; one man it brings to naught from his high estate, another though of no Reading ἀτίταν, Fix’s emendation for the unmetrical ἀλήταν of MS. account it crowns with happiness. To shun what fate decrees, is no wise permitted; none by cunning shall thrust it from him; but he, who vainly would do so, shall have unceasing trouble. Then fall not prostrate thou, but bear what heaven sends, and set a limit to thy soul’s grief; for she, poor maid! in dying for her brothers and this land, hath won a glorious death, and splendid fame shall be her meed from all mankind; for virtue’s path leads through troublous ways. Worthy of her father, worthy of her noble birth is this conduct. And if thou dost honour the virtuous dead, I share with thee that sentiment. Servant (of Hyllus)


τὸν μὲν ἀφ' ὑψηλῶν βραχὺν ᾤκισεnor doth the same house for ever tread the path of bliss; for one kind of fortune follows hard upon another; one man it brings to naught from his high estate, another though of no Reading ἀτίταν , Fix’s emendation for the unmetrical ἀλήταν of MS. account it crowns with happiness.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Homeric Hymns, To Demeter, 480 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

480. Also there were gathering blooms with me
2. Hymn To Demeter, To Demeter, 480 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

3. Hymn To Demeter, To Demeter, 480 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

4. Andocides, On The Mysteries, 31 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Euripides, Bacchae, 474 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

474. οὐ θέμις ἀκοῦσαί σʼ, ἔστι δʼ ἄξιʼ εἰδέναι. Πενθεύς 474. It is not lawful for you to hear, but they are worth knowing. Pentheu
6. Euripides, Hippolytus, 25 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

25. to witness the solemn mystic rites and be initiated therein in Pandion’s land, i.e. Attica. Phaedra, his father’s noble wife, caught sight of him, and by my designs she found her heart was seized with wild desire.
7. Lysias, Orations, 6.51 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Sophocles, Fragments, 753.2 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Sophocles Iunior, Fragments, 753.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. Catullus, Poems, 64.260 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 22.2, 22.12 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Lucian, Alexander The False Prophet, 39 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

39. On the third came the wedding of Podalirius and Alexander’s mother; this was called Dadae[1], and torches were used. The finale was the loves of Selene and Alexander, and the birth of Rutilianus’s wife. The torch bearer and hierophant was Endymion–Alexander. He was discovered lying asleep; to him from heaven, represented by the ceiling, enter as Selene one Rutilia, a great beauty, and wife of one of the Imperial procurators. She and Alexander were lovers off the stage too, and the wretched husband had to look on at their public kissing and embracing; if there had not been a good supply of torches, things might possibly have gone even further. Shortly after, he reappeared amidst a profound hush, attired as hierophant; in a loud voice he called, ‘Hail, Glycon!’, whereto the Eumolpidae[2] and Ceryces[3] of Paphlagonia, with their clod hopping shoes and their garlic breath, made a sonorous response, ‘Hail, Alexander!’ [1] Dadae | From δαδας, torches38) [2] Eumolpidae | Chief priests of Ceres, a dignity which they enjoy by hereditary right, conferred on them by the Athenians, as descendants of Eumolpus: as the mock mysteries of Alexander were designed by him as an imitation of the great Eleusinian rites, it was very proper he should be furnished with all necessary appurteces for the performance of them.39) [3] Ceryces | Word meaning herald.
13. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 474, 1

14. Papyri, Derveni Papyrus, 9.2, 12.5, 18.5, 23.2, 23.5, 25.13, 26.8



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agamemnon, suppliants Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 104
athens, political space (and athens) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 104
carter, d.m. xix Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 104
children of heracles (heraclidae) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 104
derveni papyrus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 3
egg, cosmic e. de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 3
eisodos/oi' Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 104
eleusis, eleusinian Bull, Lied and Turner, Mystery and Secrecy in the Nag Hammadi Collection and Other Ancient Literature: Ideas and Practices: Studies for Einar Thomassen at Sixty (2011) 389
eleusis/eleusinian de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 3
eucharist Bull, Lied and Turner, Mystery and Secrecy in the Nag Hammadi Collection and Other Ancient Literature: Ideas and Practices: Studies for Einar Thomassen at Sixty (2011) 389
knowledge de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 3
mysteries Bull, Lied and Turner, Mystery and Secrecy in the Nag Hammadi Collection and Other Ancient Literature: Ideas and Practices: Studies for Einar Thomassen at Sixty (2011) 389
orphic, see bacchic, initiation, mystery cults, rites de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 3
orphic, see hieros logos de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 3
performance de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 3
profane, uninitiated de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 3
ritual Bull, Lied and Turner, Mystery and Secrecy in the Nag Hammadi Collection and Other Ancient Literature: Ideas and Practices: Studies for Einar Thomassen at Sixty (2011) 389