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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5614
Euripides, Bacchae, 970-979


ΠενθεύςPENTHEUS: Truly, the task I am undertaking deserves it. Exit PENTHEUS. DIONYSUS: Strange, ah! strange is thy career, leading to scenes of woe so strange, that thou shalt achieve a fame that towers to heaven. Stretch forth thy hands, Agave, and ye her sisters, daughters of Cadmus; mighty is the strife to which I am bringing the youthful king, and the victory shall rest with me and Bromius; all else the event will show. Exit DIONYSUS. CHORUS: To the hills! to the hills! fleet hounds of madness, where the daughters of Cadmus hold their revels, goad them into wild fury against the man disguised in woman's dress, a frenzied spy upon the Maenads. First shall his mother mark him as he peers from some smooth rock or riven tree, and thus to the Maenads she will call, "Who is this of Cadmus' sons comes hasting to the mount, to the mountain away, to spy on us, my Bacchanals? Whose child can he be? For he was never born of woman's blood; but from some lioness maybe or Libyan Gorgon is he sprung." Let justice appear and show herself, sword in hand, to plunge it through and through the throat of the godless, lawless, impious son of Echion, earth's monstrous child! who with wicked heart and lawless rage, with mad intent and frantic purpose, sets out to meddle with thy holy rites, and with thy mother's, Bacchic god, thinking with his weak arm to master might as masterless as thine. This is the life that saves all pain, if a man confine his thoughts to human themes, as is his mortal nature, making no pretence where heaven is concerned. I envy not deep subtleties; far other joys have I, in tracking out great truths writ clear from all eternity, that a man should live his life by day and night in purity and holiness, striving toward a noble goal, and should honour the gods by casting from him each ordinance that lies outside the pale of right. Let justice show herself, advancing sword in hand to plunge it through and through the throat of Echion's son, that godless, lawless, and abandoned child of earth! Appear, O Bacchus, to our eyes as a bull or serpent with a hundred heads, or take the shape of a lion breathing flame! Oh! come, and with a mocking smile cast the deadly noose about the hunter of thy Bacchanals, e'en as he swoops upon the Maenads gathered yonder. Enter SECOND MESSENGER. SECOND MESSENGER O house, so prosperous once through Hellas long ago, home of the old Sidonian prince, who sowed the serpent's crop of earth-born men, how do I mourn thee! slave though I be, yet still the sorrows of his master touch a good slave's heart. CHORUS: How now? Hast thou fresh tidings of the Bacchantes? SECOND MESSENGER Pentheus, Echion's son is dead. CHORUS: Bromius, my king! now art thou appearing in thy might divine. SECOND MESSENGER Ha! what is it thou sayest? art thou glad, woman, at my master's misfortunes? CHORUS: A stranger I, and in foreign tongue I express my joy, for now no more do I cower in terror of the chain. SECOND MESSENGER Dost think Thebes so poor in men?( ) ( Probably the whole of one iambic line with part of another is here lost.)


ΠενθεύςYes indeed, such luxury! Pentheu


ΔιόνυσοςPENTHEUS: Truly, the task I am undertaking deserves it. Exit PENTHEUS. DIONYSUS: Strange, ah! strange is thy career, leading to scenes of woe so strange, that thou shalt achieve a fame that towers to heaven. Stretch forth thy hands, Agave, and ye her sisters, daughters of Cadmus; mighty is the strife to which I am bringing the youthful king, and the victory shall rest with me and Bromius; all else the event will show. Exit DIONYSUS. CHORUS: To the hills! to the hills! fleet hounds of madness, where the daughters of Cadmus hold their revels, goad them into wild fury against the man disguised in woman's dress, a frenzied spy upon the Maenads. First shall his mother mark him as he peers from some smooth rock or riven tree, and thus to the Maenads she will call, "Who is this of Cadmus' sons comes hasting to the mount, to the mountain away, to spy on us, my Bacchanals? Whose child can he be? For he was never born of woman's blood; but from some lioness maybe or Libyan Gorgon is he sprung." Let justice appear and show herself, sword in hand, to plunge it through and through the throat of the godless, lawless, impious son of Echion, earth's monstrous child! who with wicked heart and lawless rage, with mad intent and frantic purpose, sets out to meddle with thy holy rites, and with thy mother's, Bacchic god, thinking with his weak arm to master might as masterless as thine. This is the life that saves all pain, if a man confine his thoughts to human themes, as is his mortal nature, making no pretence where heaven is concerned. I envy not deep subtleties; far other joys have I, in tracking out great truths writ clear from all eternity, that a man should live his life by day and night in purity and holiness, striving toward a noble goal, and should honour the gods by casting from him each ordinance that lies outside the pale of right. Let justice show herself, advancing sword in hand to plunge it through and through the throat of Echion's son, that godless, lawless, and abandoned child of earth! Appear, O Bacchus, to our eyes as a bull or serpent with a hundred heads, or take the shape of a lion breathing flame! Oh! come, and with a mocking smile cast the deadly noose about the hunter of thy Bacchanals, e'en as he swoops upon the Maenads gathered yonder. Enter SECOND MESSENGER. SECOND MESSENGER O house, so prosperous once through Hellas long ago, home of the old Sidonian prince, who sowed the serpent's crop of earth-born men, how do I mourn thee! slave though I be, yet still the sorrows of his master touch a good slave's heart. CHORUS: How now? Hast thou fresh tidings of the Bacchantes? SECOND MESSENGER Pentheus, Echion's son is dead. CHORUS: Bromius, my king! now art thou appearing in thy might divine. SECOND MESSENGER Ha! what is it thou sayest? art thou glad, woman, at my master's misfortunes? CHORUS: A stranger I, and in foreign tongue I express my joy, for now no more do I cower in terror of the chain. SECOND MESSENGER Dost think Thebes so poor in men?( ) ( Probably the whole of one iambic line with part of another is here lost.)


ΔιόνυσοςYes indeed, such luxury! Pentheu


δεινὸς σὺ δεινὸς κἀπὶ δείνʼ ἔρχῃ πάθηYou are terrible, terrible, and you go to terrible sufferings, so that you will find a renown reaching to heaven. Reach out your hands, Agave, and you too, her sisters, daughters of Kadmos. I lead this young man


ὥστʼ οὐρανῷ στηρίζον εὑρήσεις κλέος.You are terrible, terrible, and you go to terrible sufferings, so that you will find a renown reaching to heaven. Reach out your hands, Agave, and you too, her sisters, daughters of Kadmos. I lead this young man


nanYou are terrible, terrible, and you go to terrible sufferings, so that you will find a renown reaching to heaven. Reach out your hands, Agave, and you too, her sisters, daughters of Kadmos. I lead this young man


Κάδμου θυγατέρες· τὸν νεανίαν ἄγωYou are terrible, terrible, and you go to terrible sufferings, so that you will find a renown reaching to heaven. Reach out your hands, Agave, and you too, her sisters, daughters of Kadmos. I lead this young man


τόνδʼ εἰς ἀγῶνα μέγαν, ὁ νικήσων δʼ ἐγὼto a great contest, and Bromius and I will be the victors. The rest the matter itself will show. Choru


καὶ Βρόμιος ἔσται. τἄλλα δʼ αὐτὸ σημανεῖ. Χορόςto a great contest, and Bromius and I will be the victors. The rest the matter itself will show. Choru


ἴτε θοαὶ Λύσσας κύνες ἴτʼ εἰς ὄροςGo to the mountain, go, fleet hounds of Madness, where the daughters of Kadmos hold their company, and drive them raving


θίασον ἔνθʼ ἔχουσι Κάδμου κόραιGo to the mountain, go, fleet hounds of Madness, where the daughters of Kadmos hold their company, and drive them raving


ἀνοιστρήσατέ νινGo to the mountain, go, fleet hounds of Madness, where the daughters of Kadmos hold their company, and drive them raving


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 985-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. εὐπέταλος ἕλικι θάλλει.
2. Euripides, Bacchae, 1000-1009, 101, 1010-1019, 102, 1020-1029, 103, 1030-1039, 104, 1040-1049, 105, 1050-1059, 106, 1060-1069, 107, 1070-1079, 108, 1080-1089, 109, 1090-1099, 110, 1100-1109, 111, 1110-1119, 112, 1120-1129, 113, 1130-1139, 114, 1140-1149, 115, 1150-1152, 116-166, 353, 443-460, 493, 576-639, 64, 640-649, 65, 650-656, 66, 667, 67, 677-679, 68, 680-689, 69, 690-699, 70, 700-709, 71, 710-719, 72, 720-729, 73, 730-739, 74, 740-749, 75, 750-759, 76, 760-769, 77, 770-774, 78-84, 841, 85, 850-855, 86-91, 912-919, 92, 920-929, 93, 930-939, 94, 940-949, 95, 950-959, 96, 960-969, 97, 971-979, 98, 980-989, 99, 990-999, 100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. τέλεσαν, ταυρόκερων θεὸν 100. had perfected him, the bull-horned god, and he crowned him with crowns of snakes, for which reason Maenads cloak their wild prey over their locks. Choru
3. Sophocles, Antigone, 1116-1152, 1115 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 4.285-4.388 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Propertius, Elegies, 4.9.29, 4.9.47-4.9.50 (1st cent. BCE



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agave Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138, 139
anti-hero, dionysus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
athens Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 1060
bacchae Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 1060
bona dea and hercules, geographic ambiguity and east/west divine in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
bona dea and hercules, inclusion/exclusion in religious practices and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
bona dea and hercules, terms for bona dea worshippers Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
bull Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
cacus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
carson, a. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 1060
chorus, in drama Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
chorus (male, female), of christus patiens Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
cithaeron Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 139
concepts/values/beliefs Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 139
context/environment/milieu, socio-cultural, ideological Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
dionysia, great and rural (festivals) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
dionyso(u)s Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 1060
dionysus, effeminate/effeminacy of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
ephebic rituals Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
euripides, bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138, 139
heracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
hercules Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
hero Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
hypsipyle, in apollonius argonautica Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
jesus christ, and dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 139
jesus christ Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138, 139
liminality Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
madness, of heracles in heracles Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 180
madness, of pentheus in bacchae' Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 181
madness, of pentheus in bacchae Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 180
maenads/maenadism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 139
maenads Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
magical ritual Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 1060
messenger Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
miracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
pattern (plot/thematic) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
pentheus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138, 139
pity (ἔλεος) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
reception, of dramatic situations and themes Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138, 139
recontextualization Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
redemption Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138, 139
refiguration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
replacement/substitution of names Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
resemblances, reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138, 139
reversal of roles/plot Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
roman state, inclusion/exclusion in religious practices in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
semele Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
socrates Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 180
source text Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
sparagmos/dismemberment Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
sparagmos Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
thebes (boeotia) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
theologos (iohannes) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
theotokos (mother of god) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138, 139
thyrsos (–oi) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
tragic irony Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 139
translation Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 1060
transvestism and cross-dressing, in ephebic rituals Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
transvestism and cross-dressing, of pentheus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
women Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
woodruff, p. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 1060