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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5614
Euripides, Bacchae, 918-922


καὶ μὴν ὁρᾶν μοι δύο μὲν ἡλίους δοκῶPENTHEUS: Of a truth I seem to see two suns, and two towns of Thebes, our seven-gated city; and thou, methinks, art a bull going before to guide me, and on thy head a pair of horns have grown. Wert thou really once a brute beast? Thou hast at any rate the appearance of a bull. DIONYSUS: The god attends us, ungracious heretofore, but now our sworn friend; and now thine eyes behold the things they should. PENTHEUS: Pray, what do I resemble? Is not mine the carriage of Ino, or Agave my own mother? DIONYSUS: In seeing thee, I seem to see them in person. But this tress is straying from its place, no longer as I bound it 'neath the snood. PENTHEUS: I disarranged it from its place as I tossed it to and fro within my chamber, in Bacchic ecstasy. DIONYSUS: Well, I will rearrange it, since to tend thee is my care; hold up thy head. PENTHEUS: Come, put it straight; for on thee do I depend. DIONYSUS: Thy girdle is loose, and the folds of thy dress do not hang evenly below thy ankles. PENTHEUS: I agree to that as regards the right side, but on the other my dress hangs straight with my foot. DIONYSUS: Surely thou wilt rank me first among thy friends, when contrary to thy expectation thou findest the Bacchantes virtuous.


καὶ μὴν ὁρᾶν μοι δύο μὲν ἡλίους δοκῶOh look! I think I see two suns, and twin Thebes , the seven-gated city.


δισσὰς δὲ Θήβας καὶ πόλισμʼ ἑπτάστομον·Oh look! I think I see two suns, and twin Thebes , the seven-gated city.


καὶ ταῦρος ἡμῖν πρόσθεν ἡγεῖσθαι δοκεῖςAnd you seem to lead me, being like a bull and horns seem to grow on your head. But were you ever before a beast? For you have certainly now become a bull. Dionysu


καὶ σῷ κέρατα κρατὶ προσπεφυκέναι.And you seem to lead me, being like a bull and horns seem to grow on your head. But were you ever before a beast? For you have certainly now become a bull. Dionysu


ἀλλʼ ἦ ποτʼ ἦσθα θήρ; τεταύρωσαι γὰρ οὖν. ΔιόνυσοςAnd you seem to lead me, being like a bull and horns seem to grow on your head. But were you ever before a beast? For you have certainly now become a bull. Dionysu


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

25 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.671-2.674 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.671. /and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus. 2.672. /and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus. 2.673. /and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus. 2.674. /and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 12.184, 12.219 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Fragments, 387 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Aeschylus, Fragments, 387 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Aeschylus, Fragments, 387 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 985-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. εὐπέταλος ἕλικι θάλλει.
7. Euripides, Bacchae, 1000-1009, 101, 1010-1019, 102, 1020-1029, 103, 1030-1039, 104, 1040-1049, 105, 1050-1059, 106, 1060-1069, 107, 1070-1079, 108, 1080-1089, 109, 1090-1099, 110, 1100-1109, 111, 1110-1119, 112, 1120-1129, 113, 1130-1139, 114, 1140-1149, 115, 1150-1153, 1159, 116-123, 1232, 124-125, 1256, 126-134, 1345, 135-166, 184, 190, 195, 205-209, 21, 217-219, 22, 220-239, 324, 352-354, 379, 425, 435-460, 465, 470-473, 476-477, 482, 485-486, 493, 500-502, 506, 567, 576-579, 58, 580-609, 61, 610-639, 64, 640-649, 65, 650-656, 66, 664-669, 67, 670-671, 676-679, 68, 680-689, 69, 690-699, 70, 700-709, 71, 710-719, 72, 720-729, 73, 730-739, 74, 740-749, 75, 750-759, 76, 760-769, 77, 770-779, 78, 780-789, 79, 790-799, 80, 800-809, 81, 810-819, 82, 820-829, 83, 830-839, 84, 840-849, 85, 850-859, 86, 860-861, 87-91, 912-917, 919, 92, 920-929, 93, 930-939, 94, 940-949, 95, 950-959, 96, 960-969, 97, 970-979, 98, 980-989, 99, 990-999, 100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. τέλεσαν, ταυρόκερων θεὸν 100. had perfected him, the bull-horned god, and he crowned him with crowns of snakes, for which reason Maenads cloak their wild prey over their locks. Choru
8. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 882-883, 868 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Sophocles, Ajax, 451-460, 65-68, 687-688, 69-73, 85, 450 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Sophocles, Antigone, 1116-1152, 1115 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 678-679, 626 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 1106, 1105 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Eratosthenes, Catasterismi, 24 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

14. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 4.285-4.388 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Propertius, Elegies, 4.9.29, 4.9.47-4.9.50 (1st cent. BCE

16. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.468, 4.470 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.468. with strong repression crushed his cruel pain; 4.470. of my unnumbered debts so strongly urged
17. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 3.5.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.5.3. βουλόμενος δὲ ἀπὸ τῆς Ἰκαρίας εἰς Νάξον διακομισθῆναι, Τυρρηνῶν λῃστρικὴν ἐμισθώσατο τριήρη. οἱ δὲ αὐτὸν ἐνθέμενοι Νάξον μὲν παρέπλεον, ἠπείγοντο δὲ εἰς τὴν Ἀσίαν ἀπεμπολήσοντες. ὁ δὲ τὸν μὲν ἱστὸν 4 -- καὶ τὰς κώπας ἐποίησεν ὄφεις, τὸ δὲ σκάφος ἔπλησε κισσοῦ καὶ βοῆς αὐλῶν· οἱ δὲ ἐμμανεῖς γενόμενοι κατὰ τῆς θαλάττης ἔφυγον καὶ ἐγένοντο δελφῖνες. ὣς δὲ 1 -- αὐτὸν θεὸν ἄνθρωποι ἐτίμων, ὁ δὲ ἀναγαγὼν ἐξ Ἅιδου τὴν μητέρα, καὶ προσαγορεύσας Θυώνην, μετʼ αὐτῆς εἰς οὐρανὸν ἀνῆλθεν.
18. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 2.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.9. But as it is written,"Things which an eye didn't see, and an ear didn't hear,Which didn't enter into the heart of man,These God has prepared for those who love him.
19. New Testament, 2 Corinthians, 4.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

20. New Testament, Acts, 9.11-9.12 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.11. The Lord said to him, "Arise, and go to the street which is called Straight, and inquire in the house of Judas for one named Saul, a man of Tarsus. For behold, he is praying 9.12. and in a vision he has seen a man named Aias coming in, and laying his hands on him, that he might receive his sight.
21. Seneca The Younger, Agamemnon, 35-36, 728-736, 794-795, 34 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

22. Antoninus Liberalis, Collection of Metamorphoses, 10.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

23. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 1.30, 2.5 (2nd cent. CE

1.30. ACCORDINGLY Apollonius entered escorted by a number of people, for they had learnt that the king was pleased with the newcomer and though that this would gratify him; but as he passed into the palace, he did not glance at anything that others admired, but he passed them by as if he was still traveling on the highroad, and calling Damis to him he said: You asked me yesterday what was the name of the Pamphylian woman who is said to have been intimate with Sappho, and to have composed the hymns which they sing in honor of Artemis of Perga, in the Aeolian and Pamphylian modes. Yes, I did ask you, said Damis, but you did not tell me her name. I did not tell you it, my good fellow, but I explained to you about the keys in which the hymns are written, and I told you about the names; and how the Aeolian strains were altered into the highest key of all, that which is peculiar to the Pamphylians. After that we turned to another subject, for you did not ask me again about the name of the lady. Well, she is called — this clever lady is — Damophyle, and she is said, like Sappho, to have had girlfriends and to have composed poems, some of which were love-songs and others hymns. The particular hymn to Artemis was transposed by her, and the singing of it derives from Sapphic odes. How far then he was from being astonished at the king and his pomp and ceremony, he showed by the fact that he did not think such things worth looking at, but went on talking about other things, as if he did not think the palace worth a glance. 2.5. And as they were passing over the summit of the mountain, going on foot, for it was very steep, Apollonius asked of Damis the following question. Tell me, he said, where we were yesterday. And he replied: On the plain. And today, O Damis, where are we? In the Caucasus, said he, if wholly I mistake not. Then when were you lower down than you are now? he asked again, and Damis replied: That's a question hardly worth asking. For yesterday we were traveling through the valley below, while today we are close up to heaven. Then you think, said the other, O Damis, that our road yesterday lay low down, whereas our road today lies high up? Yes, by Zeus, he replied, unless at least I'm mad. In what respect then, said Apollonius, do you suppose that our roads differ from one another, and what advantage has todays' path for you over that of yesterday? Because, said Damis, yesterday I was walking along where a great many people go, but today, where are very few. Well, said the other, O Damis, can you not also in a city turn out of the main street and walk where you will find very few people? I did not say that, replied Damis, but that yesterday we were passing through villages and populations, whereas today we are ascending through an untrodden and divine region: for you heard our guide say that the barbarians declare this tract to be the home of the gods. And with that he glanced up to the summit of the mountain. But Apollonius recalled his attention to the original question by saying: Can you tell me then, O Damis, what understanding of divine mystery you get by walking so near the heavens? None whatever, he replied. And yet you ought, said Apollonius. When your feet are placed on a platform so divine and vast as this, you ought henceforth to publish more accurate conceptions of the heaven and about the sun and moon, since you think, I suppose, that you will even lay a rod to them as you stand as close to the heavens here. Whatever, said he, I knew about God's nature yesterday, I equally know today, and so far no fresh idea has occurred to me concerning him.So then, replied the other, you are, O Damis, still below, and have won nothing from being high up, and you are as far from heaven as you were yesterday. And my question which I asked you to begin with was a fair one, although you thought that I asked it in order to make fun of you. The truth is, replied Damis, that I thought I should anyhow go down from the mountain wiser than I came up it, because I had heard, O Apollonius, that Anaxagoras of Clazomenae observed the heavenly bodies from the mountain Mimas in Ionia, and Thales of Miletus from Mycale which was close by his home; and some are said to have used as their observation mount Pangaeus and others Athos. But I have come up a greater height than any of these, and yet shall go down again no wiser than I was before. For neither did they, replied Apollonius: and such lookouts show you indeed a bluer heaven and bigger stars and the sun rising out of the night; but all these phenomena were manifest long ago to shepherds and goatherds, but neither Athos will reveal to those who climb up it, nor Olympus, so much extolled by the poets, in what way God cares for the human race and how he delights to be worshipped by them, nor reveal the nature of virtue and of justice and temperance, unless the soul scan these matters narrowly, and the soul, I should say, if it engages on the task pure and undefiled, will sour much higher than this summit of Caucasus.
24. Papyri, Papyri Graecae Magicae, 7.505-7.528, 8.1-8.63 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

25. Plotinus, Enneads, 4.3.12 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Demoen and Praet, Theios Sophistes: Essays on Flavius Philostratus' Vita Apollonii (2009) 58
aeneas at cumae, echoes in senecas agamemnon Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 204
aeschylus, double vision Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 204
aeschylus, oidipous Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 223
aeschylus, role doubling in Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 204
aeschylus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
agave Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
ajax Demoen and Praet, Theios Sophistes: Essays on Flavius Philostratus' Vita Apollonii (2009) 58; Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 223; Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 171
anaxagoras Demoen and Praet, Theios Sophistes: Essays on Flavius Philostratus' Vita Apollonii (2009) 58
anti-hero, dionysus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
antiquity Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 344
athena Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 319
athens, athenian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 319
bacchants, bacchae, bacchai Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 340, 344
bacchic/dionysiac inspiration Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 204
bacchic Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 851
bear Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 323
bona dea and hercules, geographic ambiguity and east/west divine in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
bona dea and hercules, inclusion/exclusion in religious practices and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
bona dea and hercules, terms for bona dea worshippers Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
bull Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 319, 323, 340, 344; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
cacus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
chorus, in drama Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
chorus (male, female), of a. bassarae or bassarides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
chorus (male, female), of christus patiens Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
chorus (male, female), of e. bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 50, 100
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 340
cithaeron Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
clemens alexandrinus Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 95
context/environment/milieu, socio-cultural, ideological Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 319, 323
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 100
daimon Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 31
danger, of divine gaze Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 171
demeter Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 851
dido Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 204
dieux Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 95
dionysia, great and rural (festivals) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
dionysiac/bacchic inspiration Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 204
dionyso(u)s Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 851
dionysos, dionysos as bull Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 323, 340, 344
dionysos, dionysos as deus ex machina Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 340
dionysos, dionysos diosphos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 344
dionysos, dionysos xenos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 319, 323
dionysos, epiphany Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 323, 340, 344
dionysos, prodigies Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 340
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 319, 323, 340, 344
dionysus, ambiguities/polarities of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 50
dionysus, anthropomorphism of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 100
dionysus, as a bull/his bestial incarnation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49, 50, 100
dionysus, effeminate/effeminacy of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 100, 138
dionysus, god of nature Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 50
dionysus, illusion Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49, 50
dionysus, opposites of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 50
dionysus, tripartite nature of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 100
dionysus Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 31; Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 171; deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 267
divination Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 95
divinity, and power of sight Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 171
double dreams and visions, previous research Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 274
double dreams and visions, terminlogy and definitions Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 274
earth, earthly Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 340
earthquake Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 340
ecstasy/ecstasis Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
electra Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 204
eleusis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 851; deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 267
ephebic rituals Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
euripides, bacchae Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 223; Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 171; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49, 50, 100, 138
feu/fire Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 95
fire Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 323, 344
gaze, divine Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 171
hallucination/delusion Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49, 100
hera Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 100
heracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112; Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 171
hercules Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
hermes Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 31
hero Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
hero cult Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 223
honey Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 340
hubris Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
hypsipyle, in apollonius argonautica Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
image Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 95; Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 31
incense Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 340
initiation, initié Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 95
initiation Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 95
interrogation (-scene) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 100
jesus christ Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
knowledge Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 31
lightning Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 340
liminality Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
lion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 323
logos (chrétien) Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 95
lycurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
lydia, lydian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 319
madness, of heracles in heracles Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 180
madness, of pentheus in bacchae Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 180
madness (mania)/frenzy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
maenadism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 267
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 344
maenads/maenadism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49, 100
maenads Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
magical ritual Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 319, 323, 340, 344
messenger Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
milk Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 340
minyades (daughters of minyas) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 100
miracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
mysteries Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 31
mystery Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
mystery cult, and hero cult Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 223
mystery cult, death in Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 223
mystical religion Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 851
mystères (culte), chrétiens Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 95
mystères (culte) Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 95
myths, aetiological Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 223
odysseus Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 95
oidipous Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 223
on stage Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49, 100
oreibasia ὀρειβασία Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 340
orpheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
paganism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 267
parody Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
pattern (plot/thematic) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
pentheus, as mystic initiand Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 223
pentheus, death Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 340
pentheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 319, 323, 340, 344; Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49, 50, 100, 138
personal daimon Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 31
philostratus Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 95
pity (ἔλεος) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
prodigies of dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 340
prosopon Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 171
reception, of dramatic situations and themes Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
recontextualization Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
redemption Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
refiguration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49, 138
replacement/substitution of names Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
resemblances, bassarae/bassarides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49, 50
resemblances, edonoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49, 100
resemblances, lycurgeia Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 50
resemblances, reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
resemblances, semele/hydrophoroi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 100
resemblances Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 100
reversal of roles/plot Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
rite/rituel Fleury and Schmidt, Perceptions of the Second Sophistic and Its Times - Regards sur la Seconde Sophistique et son époque(2010) 95
rites deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 267
roman state, inclusion/exclusion in religious practices in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
sappho Demoen and Praet, Theios Sophistes: Essays on Flavius Philostratus' Vita Apollonii (2009) 58
semele Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
semenzato, c. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 851
sight, power of, of divinities Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 171
socrates Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 180
sophocles, ajax Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 223
sophocles, oedipus at colonus Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 223
source text Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
sparagmos/dismemberment Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 100, 138
sparagmos Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
th ales Demoen and Praet, Theios Sophistes: Essays on Flavius Philostratus' Vita Apollonii (2009) 58
theater, theatrical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 319, 323
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 319, 323, 340, 344
thebes (boeotia) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
theologos (iohannes) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
theomachos (–oi)/theomachia/theomachein Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
theotokos (mother of god) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
thyrsos (–oi) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
tragedy, tragic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 340
transformation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 50, 100
transvestism and cross-dressing, in ephebic rituals Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
transvestism and cross-dressing, of pentheus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
violence/violent Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 344
wine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 340, 344
woman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 319, 344
womb' Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 31
women Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
worship Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 340
worshippers Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 340
zeus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 340, 344; deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 267