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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5614
Euripides, Bacchae, 912-919


σὲ τὸν πρόθυμον ὄνθʼ ἃ μὴ χρεὼν ὁρᾶνYou who are eager to see what you ought not and hasty in pursuit of what ought not to be pursued—I mean you, Pentheus, come forth before the house, be seen by me


σπεύδοντά τʼ ἀσπούδαστα, Πενθέα λέγωYou who are eager to see what you ought not and hasty in pursuit of what ought not to be pursued—I mean you, Pentheus, come forth before the house, be seen by me


ἔξιθι πάροιθε δωμάτων, ὄφθητί μοιYou who are eager to see what you ought not and hasty in pursuit of what ought not to be pursued—I mean you, Pentheus, come forth before the house, be seen by me


σκευὴν γυναικὸς μαινάδος βάκχης ἔχωνwearing the clothing of a woman, of an inspired maenad, a spy upon your mother and her company. Pentheus emerges. In appearance you are like one of Kadmos’ daughters. Pentheu


μητρός τε τῆς σῆς καὶ λόχου κατάσκοπος·wearing the clothing of a woman, of an inspired maenad, a spy upon your mother and her company. Pentheus emerges. In appearance you are like one of Kadmos’ daughters. Pentheu


πρέπεις δὲ Κάδμου θυγατέρων μορφὴν μιᾷ. Πενθεύςwearing the clothing of a woman, of an inspired maenad, a spy upon your mother and her company. Pentheus emerges. In appearance you are like one of Kadmos’ daughters. Pentheu


καὶ μὴν ὁρᾶν μοι δύο μὲν ἡλίους δοκῶPENTHEUS: Of a truth I seem to see two suns, and two towns of Thebes, our seven-gated city; and thou, methinks, art a bull going before to guide me, and on thy head a pair of horns have grown. Wert thou really once a brute beast? Thou hast at any rate the appearance of a bull. DIONYSUS: The god attends us, ungracious heretofore, but now our sworn friend; and now thine eyes behold the things they should. PENTHEUS: Pray, what do I resemble? Is not mine the carriage of Ino, or Agave my own mother? DIONYSUS: In seeing thee, I seem to see them in person. But this tress is straying from its place, no longer as I bound it 'neath the snood. PENTHEUS: I disarranged it from its place as I tossed it to and fro within my chamber, in Bacchic ecstasy. DIONYSUS: Well, I will rearrange it, since to tend thee is my care; hold up thy head. PENTHEUS: Come, put it straight; for on thee do I depend. DIONYSUS: Thy girdle is loose, and the folds of thy dress do not hang evenly below thy ankles. PENTHEUS: I agree to that as regards the right side, but on the other my dress hangs straight with my foot. DIONYSUS: Surely thou wilt rank me first among thy friends, when contrary to thy expectation thou findest the Bacchantes virtuous.


καὶ μὴν ὁρᾶν μοι δύο μὲν ἡλίους δοκῶOh look! I think I see two suns, and twin Thebes , the seven-gated city.


δισσὰς δὲ Θήβας καὶ πόλισμʼ ἑπτάστομον·Oh look! I think I see two suns, and twin Thebes , the seven-gated city.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Aristophanes, Frogs, 412 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

412. νῦν δὴ κατεῖδον καὶ μάλ' εὐπροσώπου
2. Euripides, Bacchae, 1001-1023, 1034, 1047, 1050, 1057-1062, 1075, 1115, 114, 1150-1153, 1232, 1256, 126-128, 132-134, 1345, 149, 155-161, 184, 190, 195, 205-209, 21-22, 220, 226-232, 278-283, 324, 328-329, 379, 425, 451-460, 465, 470-477, 482, 485-486, 493, 500-502, 506, 511-514, 567, 58, 609, 61, 616-631, 641, 680, 726, 73-74, 794-797, 810-815, 819, 821, 823, 829-836, 838, 850-855, 861-862, 876-911, 913-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1000. παρακόπῳ τε λήματι στέλλεται 1000. and mad disposition violently to overcome by force what is invincible—death is the discipline for his purposes, accepting no excuses when the affairs of the gods are concerned; to act like a mortal—this is a life that is free from pain. The text and meaning of these and the following lines are highly uncertain. The above translation is based on the paraphrase that Murray includes in his apparatus qui iniuste etc. (v. 997), ei sententiarum castigatrix in rebus divinis indeprecabilis Mors est .
3. Euripides, Medea, 1330-1340, 1378, 534-538, 1329 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

815c. All the dancing that is of a Bacchic kind and cultivated by those who indulge in drunken imitations of Pans, Sileni and Satyrs (as they call them), when performing certain rites of expiation and initiation,—all this class of dancing cannot easily be defined either as pacific or as warlike, or as of any one distinct kind. The most correct way of defining it seems to me to be this—
5. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

354a. But furthermore, he who lives well is blessed and happy, and he who does not the contrary. of course. Then the just is happy and the unjust miserable. So be it, he said. But it surely does not pay to be miserable, but to be happy. of course not. Never, then, most worshipful Thrasymachus, can injustice be more profitable than justice. Let this complete your entertainment, Socrates, at the festival of Bendis. A feast furnished by you, Thrasymachus, I said, now that you have become gentle with me and are no longer angry. I have not dined well, however—
6. Demosthenes, Orations, 59.78 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Septuagint, 3 Maccabees, 1.12, 3.25, 5.5-5.6, 5.11, 5.27-5.30, 5.42-5.43, 6.27 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

1.12. Even after the law had been read to him, he did not cease to maintain that he ought to enter, saying, "Even if those men are deprived of this honor, I ought not to be. 3.25. Therefore we have given orders that, as soon as this letter shall arrive, you are to send to us those who live among you, together with their wives and children, with insulting and harsh treatment, and bound securely with iron fetters, to suffer the sure and shameful death that befits enemies. 5.5. The servants in charge of the Jews went out in the evening and bound the hands of the wretched people and arranged for their continued custody through the night, convinced that the whole nation would experience its final destruction. 5.5. Not only this, but when they considered the help which they had received before from heaven they prostrated themselves with one accord on the ground, removing the babies from their breasts 5.6. For to the Gentiles it appeared that the Jews were left without any aid 5.11. But the Lord sent upon the king a portion of sleep, that beneficence which from the beginning, night and day, is bestowed by him who grants it to whomever he wishes. 5.27. But he, upon receiving the report and being struck by the unusual invitation to come out -- since he had been completely overcome by incomprehension -- inquired what the matter was for which this had been so zealously completed for him. 5.28. This was the act of God who rules over all things, for he had implanted in the king's mind a forgetfulness of the things he had previously devised. 5.29. Then Hermon and all the king's friends pointed out that the beasts and the armed forces were ready, "O king, according to your eager purpose. 5.42. Upon this the king, a Phalaris in everything and filled with madness, took no account of the changes of mind which had come about within him for the protection of the Jews, and he firmly swore an irrevocable oath that he would send them to death without delay, mangled by the knees and feet of the beasts 5.43. and would also march against Judea and rapidly level it to the ground with fire and spear, and by burning to the ground the temple inaccessible to him would quickly render it forever empty of those who offered sacrifices there. 6.27. Loose and untie their unjust bonds! Send them back to their homes in peace, begging pardon for your former actions!
8. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 3.65.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.65.7.  But some of the poets, one of whom is Antimachus, state that Lycurgus was king, not of Thrace, but of Arabia, and that the attack upon Dionysus and the Bacchantes was made at the Nysa which is in Arabia. However this may be, Dionysus, they say, punished the impious but treated all other men honourably, and then made his return journey from India to Thebes upon an elephant.
9. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 4.285-4.388 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Propertius, Elegies, 4.9.29, 4.9.47-4.9.50 (1st cent. BCE

11. New Testament, Acts, 26.24-26.25 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

26.24. As he thus made his defense, Festus said with a loud voice, "Paul, you are crazy! Your great learning is driving you insane! 26.25. But he said, "I am not crazy, most excellent Festus, but boldly declare words of truth and reasonableness.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agave Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
alexandria, alexandrian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
aphrodite, revenge of, in hippolytus Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 178
artemis Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 178
bacchic Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 851
bona dea and hercules, geographic ambiguity and east/west divine in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
bona dea and hercules, inclusion/exclusion in religious practices and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
bona dea and hercules, terms for bona dea worshippers Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
cacus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
censer θυμιατήριον Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
chorus (male, female), of christus patiens Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
concepts/values/beliefs Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 173
context/environment/milieu, socio-cultural, ideological Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 322, 459
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 169, 173
death associated with dionysos and dionysian cult or myth Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
demeter Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 851
dionysism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
dionyso(u)s Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 851
dionysos, dionysos xenos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 322
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 322, 459
dionysus, and hēsychia Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 173
dionysus, effeminate/effeminacy of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
dionysus, sōphrōn/sophos Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 169
egypt, egyptian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
eleusis, eleusinian, mysteries Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 322
eleusis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 851
ephebic rituals Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
euripides, bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138, 169
figura etymologica Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 169
flute Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
gift Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
hercules Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
hybris Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
hypsipyle, in apollonius argonautica Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
hēsychia/calm life/quietism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 173
incense Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
initiands/initiates/initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 173
initiate Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 322
initiation, initiatory rites Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 322
ivy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
jerusalem, temple of Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
jesus christ Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
jews, jewish Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
liberation Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
liminality Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
madness, of heracles in heracles Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 180
madness, of pentheus in bacchae Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 180
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 322
maenads/maenadism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 173
magical ritual Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
makarismos Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 173
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 322
medea, revenge in Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 178
messengers/messenger-speech Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 169
mysteries, mystery cults, bacchic, dionysiac Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
mystery Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 173
mystic initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 173
mystical religion Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 851
parodos, of bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 173
pattern (plot/thematic) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
pentheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 322, 459; Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138, 169
performance Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 322
pity (ἔλεος) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
possession, possessed Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
priamel Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 173
promise Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
ptolemies Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
ptolemy iv philopator Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
reception, of concepts and ideas Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 169, 173
reception, of dramatic situations and themes Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
recontextualization Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
redemption Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
refiguration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
replacement/substitution of names Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138, 169
resemblances, reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138, 169, 173
revenge, of hera in heracles Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 178
revenge, of medea Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 178
revenge, reverse retaliation Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 178
reversal of roles/plot Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 322, 459
roman state, inclusion/exclusion in religious practices in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
seleucids Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
semele Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
semenzato, c. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 851
socrates Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 180
source text Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
sparagmos/dismemberment Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138, 169
sōphrosynē/sōphrōn Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 169
teiresias Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 169
temple Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 322, 459
theologos (iohannes) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
theomachist, theomachus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
theotokos (mother of god) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
thyrsos (–oi) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 138
transvestism and cross-dressing, in ephebic rituals Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
transvestism and cross-dressing, of pentheus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 257
variations Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 169
violence/violent Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
wine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 459
woman' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 322
xenia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 322