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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5614
Euripides, Bacchae, 701-709


ὅσαις νεοτόκοις μαστὸς ἦν σπαργῶν ἔτιwolf-pup, gave them white milk, as many as had abandoned their new-born infants and had their breasts still swollen. They put on garlands of ivy, and oak, and flowering yew. One took her thyrsos and struck it against a rock


βρέφη λιπούσαις· ἐπὶ δʼ ἔθεντο κισσίνουςwolf-pup, gave them white milk, as many as had abandoned their new-born infants and had their breasts still swollen. They put on garlands of ivy, and oak, and flowering yew. One took her thyrsos and struck it against a rock


στεφάνους δρυός τε μίλακός τʼ ἀνθεσφόρου.wolf-pup, gave them white milk, as many as had abandoned their new-born infants and had their breasts still swollen. They put on garlands of ivy, and oak, and flowering yew. One took her thyrsos and struck it against a rock


θύρσον δέ τις λαβοῦσʼ ἔπαισεν ἐς πέτρανAnd one took her thyrsus and struck it into a rock, and forth there gushed a limpid spring; and another plunged her wand into the lap of earth and there the god sent up a fount of wine; and all who wished for draughts of milk had but to scratch the soil with their finger-tips and there they had it in abundance, while from every ivy-wreathed staff sweet rills of honey trickled. Hadst thou been there and seen this, thou wouldst have turned to pray to the god, whom now thou dost disparage. Anon we herdsmen and shepherds met to discuss their strange and wondrous doings; then one, who wandereth oft to town and hath a trick of speech, made harangue in the midst, "O ye who dwell upon the hallowed mountain-terraces!


θύρσον δέ τις λαβοῦσʼ ἔπαισεν ἐς πέτρανwolf-pup, gave them white milk, as many as had abandoned their new-born infants and had their breasts still swollen. They put on garlands of ivy, and oak, and flowering yew. One took her thyrsos and struck it against a rock


ὅθεν δροσώδης ὕδατος ἐκπηδᾷ νοτίς·from which a dewy stream of water sprang forth. Another let her thyrsos strike the ground, and there the god sent forth a fountain of wine. All who desired the white drink scratched the earth with the tips of their fingers and obtained streams of milk;


ἄλλη δὲ νάρθηκʼ ἐς πέδον καθῆκε γῆςfrom which a dewy stream of water sprang forth. Another let her thyrsos strike the ground, and there the god sent forth a fountain of wine. All who desired the white drink scratched the earth with the tips of their fingers and obtained streams of milk;


καὶ τῇδε κρήνην ἐξανῆκʼ οἴνου θεός·from which a dewy stream of water sprang forth. Another let her thyrsos strike the ground, and there the god sent forth a fountain of wine. All who desired the white drink scratched the earth with the tips of their fingers and obtained streams of milk;


ὅσαις δὲ λευκοῦ πώματος πόθος παρῆνfrom which a dewy stream of water sprang forth. Another let her thyrsos strike the ground, and there the god sent forth a fountain of wine. All who desired the white drink scratched the earth with the tips of their fingers and obtained streams of milk;


ἄκροισι δακτύλοισι διαμῶσαι χθόναfrom which a dewy stream of water sprang forth. Another let her thyrsos strike the ground, and there the god sent forth a fountain of wine. All who desired the white drink scratched the earth with the tips of their fingers and obtained streams of milk;


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.130-6.140 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.130. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.131. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.132. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.133. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.134. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.135. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.136. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.137. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.138. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.139. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.140. /and he lived not for long, seeing that he was hated of all the immortal gods. So would not I be minded to fight against the blessed gods. But if thou art of men, who eat the fruit of the field, draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. Then spake to him the glorious son of Hippolochus:
2. Anacreon, Fragments, 357 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Anacreon, Fragments, 357 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Aristophanes, Birds, 1745 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1745. καὶ τὰς χθονίας κλῄσατε βροντὰς
5. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 985-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. εὐπέταλος ἕλικι θάλλει.
6. Euripides, Bacchae, 1000-1009, 101, 1010-1019, 102, 1020-1029, 103, 1030-1039, 104, 1040-1049, 105, 1050-1059, 106, 1060-1069, 107, 1070-1079, 108, 1080-1089, 109, 1090-1099, 110, 1100-1109, 111, 1110-1119, 112, 1120-1129, 113, 1130-1139, 114, 1140-1149, 115, 1150-1152, 1159, 116-166, 216-220, 234-236, 31, 312-317, 32-38, 389, 39, 390-392, 40, 434-491, 493-494, 498-502, 506-507, 511-514, 518, 576-639, 64, 640-649, 65, 650-656, 66, 664-669, 67, 670-671, 676-679, 68, 680-689, 69, 690-699, 70, 700, 702-709, 71, 710-719, 72, 720-729, 73, 730-739, 74, 740-749, 75, 750-759, 76, 760-769, 77, 770-779, 78, 780-789, 79, 790-799, 80, 800-809, 81, 810-819, 82, 820-829, 83, 830-839, 84, 840-849, 85, 850-859, 86, 860-861, 87-91, 918-919, 92, 920-929, 93, 930-939, 94, 940-949, 95, 950-959, 96, 960-969, 97, 970-979, 98, 980-989, 99, 990-999, 100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. τέλεσαν, ταυρόκερων θεὸν 100. had perfected him, the bull-horned god, and he crowned him with crowns of snakes, for which reason Maenads cloak their wild prey over their locks. Choru
7. Euripides, Ion, 30 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

30. that dwell in glorious Athens, for well thou knowest Athena’s city, and take a new-born babe from out the hollow rock, his cradle and his swaddling-clothes as well, and bear him to my prophetic shrine at Delphi, and set him at the entering-in of my temple.
8. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 40 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Sophocles, Antigone, 1116-1152, 1115 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 1606 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Eratosthenes, Catasterismi, 24 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

12. Plutarch, Camillus, 5.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.2. From the sacred rites used in the worship of this goddess, she might be held to be almost identical with Leucothea. The women bring a serving-maid into the sanctuary and beat her with rods, then drive her forth again; they embrace their nephews and nieces in preference to their own children; and their conduct at the sacrifice resembles that of the nurses of Dionysus, or that of Ino under the afflictions put upon her by her husband’s concubine. After his vows, Camillus invaded the country of the Faliscans and conquered them in a great battle, together with the Capenates who came up to their aid.
13. Plutarch, Pericles, 38.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

38.2. Certain it is that Theophrastus, in his Ethics, querying whether one’s character follows the bent of one’s fortunes and is forced by bodily sufferings to abandon its high excellence, records this fact, that Pericles, as he lay sick, showed one of his friends who was come to see him an amulet that the women had hung round his neck, as much as to say that he was very badly off to put up with such folly as that.
14. Augustine, The City of God, 7.21 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

7.21. Now as to the rites of Liber, whom they have set over liquid seeds, and therefore not only over the liquors of fruits, among which wine holds, so to speak, the primacy, but also over the seeds of animals:- as to these rites, I am unwilling to undertake to show to what excess of turpitude they had reached, because that would entail a lengthened discourse, though I am not unwilling to do so as a demonstration of the proud stupidity of those who practise them. Among other rites which I am compelled from the greatness of their number to omit, Varro says that in Italy, at the places where roads crossed each other the rites of Liber were celebrated with such unrestrained turpitude, that the private parts of a man were worshipped in his honor. Nor was this abomination transacted in secret that some regard at least might be paid to modesty, but was openly and wantonly displayed. For during the festival of Liber this obscene member, placed on a car, was carried with great honor, first over the crossroads in the country, and then into the city. But in the town of Lavinium a whole month was devoted to Liber alone, during the days of which all the people gave themselves up to the must dissolute conversation, until that member had been carried through the forum and brought to rest in its own place; on which unseemly member it was necessary that the most honorable matron should place a wreath in the presence of all the people. Thus, forsooth, was the god Liber to be appeased in order to the growth of seeds. Thus was enchantment to be driven away from fields, even by a matron's being compelled to do in public what not even a harlot ought to be permitted to do in a theatre, if there were matrons among the spectators. For these reasons, then, Saturn alone was not believed to be sufficient for seeds - namely, that the impure mind might find occasions for multiplying the gods; and that, being righteously abandoned to uncleanness by the one true God, and being prostituted to the worship of many false gods, through an avidity for ever greater and greater uncleanness, it should call these sacrilegious rites sacred things, and should abandon itself to be violated and polluted by crowds of foul demons.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
agave Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
amulets Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 248
anti-hero, dionysus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
antiquity, late antiquity Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 543
antiquity Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 543
athena Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 169
bacchants, bacchae, bacchai Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161, 543
bacchic rites, slaves involved in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 242
bacchus/dionysus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 242
beaumont, lesley a. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 248
bull Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
chorus, in drama Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
chorus (male, female), of a. bassarae or bassarides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
chorus (male, female), of e. bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20
christus patiens, a drama for reading Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
cithaeron Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126, 129
colloquialisms Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
concepts/values/beliefs Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20, 26, 129
dance, dancing, ecstatic, frenzied, maenadic, orgiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 543
dance, dancing Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 543
delphi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
dionysia, great and rural (festivals) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
dionysos, arrival Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysos, awakening Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysos, dionysos bromios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysos, nurse of Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysos, punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysos (bacchus, god), worship by women Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 248
dionysus, as a bull/his bestial incarnation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
dionysus, effeminate/effeminacy of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26
dionysus, epiphanies/theophany of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
dionysus, god of nature Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20
dionysus, illusion Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
dionysus, paradoxes/contradictions Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26
dismemberment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
ecstasy/ecstasis Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
eidinow, esther Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 248
elegy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 543
euripides, bacchae Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 248; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49, 129
euripides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126, 129
faraone, christopher a. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 248
golden age Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 543
greek literature and practice, bacchic rites Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 242
hallucination/delusion Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
hamilton, richard Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 248
hapax legomena Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20
healing, purification ritual and law Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 248
hekate (goddess) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 248
hellenistic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
heracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
hero Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
household (oikos), family piety Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 248
household (oikos), shrines Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 248
hubris Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
hēsychia/calm life/quietism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
initiands/initiates/initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20, 26
ino Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
inspiration Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 543
interrogation (-scene) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26
ivy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
kyrene, purification law Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 248
liber Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 543
liberation Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 543
love Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 543
lycurgus, and pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20, 26
lycurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
madness (mania)/frenzy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
maecenas, auditorium of Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 543
maecenas, gardens of Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 543
maecenas Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 543
maenad-nymphs Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
maenads, maenadic, maenadism, rites/cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161, 543
maenads/maenadism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20, 26, 49, 129
maenads Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
melitaia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
messenger Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
messengers/messenger-speech Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20, 126, 129
middle age Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 543
miracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
mystery Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
mystic initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20, 26
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
neo-attic, neo-atticism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 543
nymph Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
nysa, nyseion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
on stage Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
orpheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
parker, robert c. t. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 248
parody Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26, 49, 126, 129
physis Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
plutarch Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 248
pontios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 543
pottery Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
prologue/expository opening Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
reception, of dramatic conventions Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126, 129
refiguration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26, 49
resemblances, bassarae/bassarides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
resemblances, edonoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20, 26, 49
resemblances, pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20
resemblances, reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126, 129
resemblances, xantriae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20
rite, ritual, maenadic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
rome, roman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161, 543
semele Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
sophia/sophos (wisdom) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
sparagmos Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112; Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 169
sōphrosynē/sōphrōn Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
thebes Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 248
thebes (boeotia) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
theologos (iohannes) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
theomachos (–oi)/theomachia/theomachein Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
theophrastos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 248
theotokos (mother of god) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
thunder/thunderbolt Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20
transformation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26
transmission Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26
versnel, h. s. Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 169
wine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 543
woman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
women, participation in magic Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 248
women, role in religion and ritual practice' Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 248
women Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112