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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5614
Euripides, Bacchae, 690-699


σταθεῖσα βάκχαις, ἐξ ὕπνου κινεῖν δέμαςtanding up in the midst of the Bacchae, to wake their bodies from sleep, when she heard the lowing of the horned cattle. And they, casting off refreshing sleep from their eyes, sprang upright, a marvel of orderliness to behold, old, young, and still unmarried virgins.


μυκήμαθʼ ὡς ἤκουσε κεροφόρων βοῶν.tanding up in the midst of the Bacchae, to wake their bodies from sleep, when she heard the lowing of the horned cattle. And they, casting off refreshing sleep from their eyes, sprang upright, a marvel of orderliness to behold, old, young, and still unmarried virgins.


αἳ δʼ ἀποβαλοῦσαι θαλερὸν ὀμμάτων ὕπνονtanding up in the midst of the Bacchae, to wake their bodies from sleep, when she heard the lowing of the horned cattle. And they, casting off refreshing sleep from their eyes, sprang upright, a marvel of orderliness to behold, old, young, and still unmarried virgins.


ἀνῇξαν ὀρθαί, θαῦμʼ ἰδεῖν εὐκοσμίαςtanding up in the midst of the Bacchae, to wake their bodies from sleep, when she heard the lowing of the horned cattle. And they, casting off refreshing sleep from their eyes, sprang upright, a marvel of orderliness to behold, old, young, and still unmarried virgins.


νέαι παλαιαὶ παρθένοι τʼ ἔτʼ ἄζυγες.tanding up in the midst of the Bacchae, to wake their bodies from sleep, when she heard the lowing of the horned cattle. And they, casting off refreshing sleep from their eyes, sprang upright, a marvel of orderliness to behold, old, young, and still unmarried virgins.


καὶ πρῶτα μὲν καθεῖσαν εἰς ὤμους κόμαςFirst they let their hair loose over their shoulders, and secured their fawn-skins, as many of them as had released the fastenings of their knots, girding the dappled hides with serpents licking their jaws. And some, holding in their arms a gazelle or wild


νεβρίδας τʼ ἀνεστείλανθʼ ὅσαισιν ἁμμάτωνFirst they let their hair loose over their shoulders, and secured their fawn-skins, as many of them as had released the fastenings of their knots, girding the dappled hides with serpents licking their jaws. And some, holding in their arms a gazelle or wild


σύνδεσμʼ ἐλέλυτο, καὶ καταστίκτους δορὰςFirst they let their hair loose over their shoulders, and secured their fawn-skins, as many of them as had released the fastenings of their knots, girding the dappled hides with serpents licking their jaws. And some, holding in their arms a gazelle or wild


ὄφεσι κατεζώσαντο λιχμῶσιν γένυν.First they let their hair loose over their shoulders, and secured their fawn-skins, as many of them as had released the fastenings of their knots, girding the dappled hides with serpents licking their jaws. And some, holding in their arms a gazelle or wild


αἳ δʼ ἀγκάλαισι δορκάδʼ ἢ σκύμνους λύκωνFirst they let their hair loose over their shoulders, and secured their fawn-skins, as many of them as had released the fastenings of their knots, girding the dappled hides with serpents licking their jaws. And some, holding in their arms a gazelle or wild


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

31 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.130-6.140 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.130. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.131. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.132. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.133. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.134. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.135. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.136. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.137. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.138. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.139. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.140. /and he lived not for long, seeing that he was hated of all the immortal gods. So would not I be minded to fight against the blessed gods. But if thou art of men, who eat the fruit of the field, draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. Then spake to him the glorious son of Hippolochus:
2. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 25 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

25. ἐξ οὗτε Βάκχαις ἐστρατήγησεν θεός 25. ever since he, as a god, led the Bacchantes in war, and contrived for Pentheus death as of a hunted hare. I call on the streams of Pleistus and the strength of Poseidon, and highest Zeus, the Fulfiller; and then I take my seat as prophetess upon my throne.
3. Anacreon, Fragments, 357 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Anacreon, Fragments, 357 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Aristophanes, Birds, 1745 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1745. καὶ τὰς χθονίας κλῄσατε βροντὰς
6. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 1313 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1313. θυρσαδδωᾶν καὶ παιδδωᾶν.
7. Aristophanes, Clouds, 605 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

605. Βάκχαις Δελφίσιν ἐμπρέπων
8. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 985-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. εὐπέταλος ἕλικι θάλλει.
9. Euripides, Bacchae, 1000-1009, 101, 1010-1019, 102, 1020-1029, 103, 1030-1039, 104, 1040-1049, 105, 1050-1059, 106, 1060-1069, 107, 1070-1079, 108, 1080-1089, 109, 1090-1099, 110, 1100-1109, 111, 1110-1119, 112, 1120-1129, 113, 1130-1139, 114, 1140-1149, 115, 1150-1153, 1159, 116, 1160, 1168, 117-118, 1189, 119-122, 1224, 123-138, 1387, 139-166, 169, 195, 225, 234-236, 259, 31, 312-317, 32-36, 366, 37-38, 389, 39, 390-392, 40, 415, 434-491, 493-494, 498-502, 506-507, 51, 511-514, 518, 529-530, 576-619, 62, 620-639, 64, 640-649, 65, 650-656, 66, 664-669, 67, 670-671, 676-679, 68, 680-689, 69, 691-699, 70, 700-709, 71, 710-719, 72, 720-729, 73, 730-739, 74, 740-749, 75, 750-759, 76, 760-769, 77, 770-779, 78, 780-789, 79, 790-799, 80, 800-809, 81, 810-819, 82, 820-829, 83, 830-839, 84, 840-849, 85, 850-859, 86, 860-861, 87-91, 915, 918-919, 92, 920-929, 93, 930-939, 94, 940-949, 95, 950-959, 96, 960-969, 97, 970-979, 98, 980-989, 99, 990-999, 100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. τέλεσαν, ταυρόκερων θεὸν 100. had perfected him, the bull-horned god, and he crowned him with crowns of snakes, for which reason Maenads cloak their wild prey over their locks. Choru
10. Euripides, Cyclops, 156, 38, 446, 64, 709, 72, 143 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

143. ὁ Βακχίου παῖς, ὡς σαφέστερον μάθῃς. 143. The son of the Bacchic god, that thou mayst learn more certainly. Silenu
11. Euripides, Hecuba, 121, 1076 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1076. ποῖ πᾷ φέρομαι τέκν' ἔρημα λιπὼν
12. Euripides, Helen, 543 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

543. οὐχ ὡς δρομαία πῶλος ἢ Βάκχη θεοῦ
13. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1119 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1119. I will explain, if you are no longer mad as a fiend of hell. Heracle
14. Euripides, Hippolytus, 560, 551 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Euripides, Ion, 550, 552-553, 716-717, 30 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

30. that dwell in glorious Athens, for well thou knowest Athena’s city, and take a new-born babe from out the hollow rock, his cradle and his swaddling-clothes as well, and bear him to my prophetic shrine at Delphi, and set him at the entering-in of my temple.
16. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 953, 164 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 40, 1489 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. Euripides, Rhesus, 972 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

972. As under far Pangaion Orpheus lies
19. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

69c. from all these things, and self-restraint and justice and courage and wisdom itself are a kind of purification. And I fancy that those men who established the mysteries were not unenlightened, but in reality had a hidden meaning when they said long ago that whoever goes uninitiated and unsanctified to the other world will lie in the mire, but he who arrives there initiated and purified will dwell with the gods. For as they say in the mysteries, the thyrsus-bearers are many, but the mystics few ;
20. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

253a. they seek after information themselves, and when they search eagerly within themselves to find the nature of their god, they are successful, because they have been compelled to keep their eyes fixed upon the god, and as they reach and grasp him by memory they are inspired and receive from him character and habits, so far as it is possible for a man to have part in God. Now they consider the beloved the cause of all this, so they love him more than before, and if they draw the waters of their inspiration from Zeus, like the bacchantes, they pour it out upon the beloved and make him, so far as possible, like their god.
21. Sophocles, Antigone, 1116-1152, 154, 1115 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

22. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 1606 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

23. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 211 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

24. Demosthenes, Orations, 21.52 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

25. Eratosthenes, Catasterismi, 24 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

26. Livy, History, 1.11.6-1.11.9 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

27. Vergil, Aeneis, 7.396-7.400, 9.359-9.366, 11.768-11.782 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7.396. the land of Calydon. What crime so foul 7.397. was wrought by Lapithae or Calydon? 7.398. But I, Jove's wife and Queen, who in my woes 7.399. have ventured each bold stroke my power could find 7.400. and every shift essayed,—behold me now 9.359. by great Assaracus, and every shrine 9.360. of venerable Vesta, I confide 9.361. my hopes, my fortunes, and all future weal 9.362. to your heroic hearts. O, bring me back 9.363. my father! Set him in these eyes once more! 9.364. That day will tears be dry; and I will give 9.365. two silver wine-cups graven and o'erlaid 9.366. with clear-cut figures, which my father chose 11.768. the whole skin of a tigress; with soft hands 11.769. he made her plaything of a whirling spear 11.770. or, swinging round her head the polished thong 11.771. of her good sling, she fetched from distant sky 11.772. Strymonian cranes or swans of spotless wing. 11.773. From Tuscan towns proud matrons oft in vain 11.774. ought her in marriage for their sons; but she 11.775. to Dian only turned her stainless heart 11.776. her virgin freedom and her huntress' arms 11.777. with faithful passion serving. Would that now 11.778. this Iove of war had ne'er seduced her mind 11.779. the Teucrians to provoke! So might she be 11.780. one of our wood-nymphs still. But haste, I pray 11.781. for bitter is her now impending doom. 11.782. Descend, dear nymph, from heaven, and explore
28. Plutarch, Camillus, 5.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.2. From the sacred rites used in the worship of this goddess, she might be held to be almost identical with Leucothea. The women bring a serving-maid into the sanctuary and beat her with rods, then drive her forth again; they embrace their nephews and nieces in preference to their own children; and their conduct at the sacrifice resembles that of the nurses of Dionysus, or that of Ino under the afflictions put upon her by her husband’s concubine. After his vows, Camillus invaded the country of the Faliscans and conquered them in a great battle, together with the Capenates who came up to their aid.
29. Statius, Achilleis, 1.821-1.840, 1.852-1.854, 1.864 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

30. Augustine, The City of God, 7.21 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

7.21. Now as to the rites of Liber, whom they have set over liquid seeds, and therefore not only over the liquors of fruits, among which wine holds, so to speak, the primacy, but also over the seeds of animals:- as to these rites, I am unwilling to undertake to show to what excess of turpitude they had reached, because that would entail a lengthened discourse, though I am not unwilling to do so as a demonstration of the proud stupidity of those who practise them. Among other rites which I am compelled from the greatness of their number to omit, Varro says that in Italy, at the places where roads crossed each other the rites of Liber were celebrated with such unrestrained turpitude, that the private parts of a man were worshipped in his honor. Nor was this abomination transacted in secret that some regard at least might be paid to modesty, but was openly and wantonly displayed. For during the festival of Liber this obscene member, placed on a car, was carried with great honor, first over the crossroads in the country, and then into the city. But in the town of Lavinium a whole month was devoted to Liber alone, during the days of which all the people gave themselves up to the must dissolute conversation, until that member had been carried through the forum and brought to rest in its own place; on which unseemly member it was necessary that the most honorable matron should place a wreath in the presence of all the people. Thus, forsooth, was the god Liber to be appeased in order to the growth of seeds. Thus was enchantment to be driven away from fields, even by a matron's being compelled to do in public what not even a harlot ought to be permitted to do in a theatre, if there were matrons among the spectators. For these reasons, then, Saturn alone was not believed to be sufficient for seeds - namely, that the impure mind might find occasions for multiplying the gods; and that, being righteously abandoned to uncleanness by the one true God, and being prostituted to the worship of many false gods, through an avidity for ever greater and greater uncleanness, it should call these sacrilegious rites sacred things, and should abandon itself to be violated and polluted by crowds of foul demons.
31. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 474.15-474.16



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
agave Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
amazons Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 216
anti-hero, dionysus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
apollo, apollonian, apolline Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
athena Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 169
bacchants, bacchae, bacchai Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 161
bacchic rites, in statius achilleid Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 216
bacchic rites, sexuality and maenadism Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 216
bacchic rites, slaves involved in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 242
bacchus, bacchius Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
bacchus, βάκχος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
bacchus/dionysus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 216, 242
berezan Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
bull Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
chorus, in drama Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
chorus (male, female), of a. bassarae or bassarides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
chorus (male, female), of e. bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
christus patiens, a drama for reading Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
cithaeron Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126, 129
classical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
colloquialisms Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
comedy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
concepts/values/beliefs Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20, 26, 129
deidamia Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 216
delphi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
diana/artemis Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 216
dionysia, great and rural (festivals) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
dionysos, arrival Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysos, awakening Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysos, dionysos baccheios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
dionysos, dionysos bacchios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
dionysos, dionysos bacchos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
dionysos, dionysos bromios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 161
dionysos, nurse of Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysos, punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 161
dionysus, as a bull/his bestial incarnation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
dionysus, effeminate/effeminacy of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26
dionysus, epiphanies/theophany of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
dionysus, god of nature Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20
dionysus, illusion Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
dionysus, paradoxes/contradictions Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26
dismemberment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
ecstasy/ecstasis Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
elegy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
epigram Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
euripides, bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49, 129
euripides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126, 129
feminization/effeminacy Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 216
greek literature and practice, bacchic rites Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 242
hallucination/delusion Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
hapax legomena Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20
hellenistic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
heracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
hero Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
hipponion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
hubris Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
hēsychia/calm life/quietism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
initiands/initiates/initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20, 26
ino Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
interrogation (-scene) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26
ivy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
lycurgus, and pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20, 26
lycurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
lyric Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
madness (mania)/frenzy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
maenad-nymphs Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
maenads, maenadic, maenadism, rites/cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
maenads/maenadism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20, 26, 49, 129
maenads Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
melitaia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
messenger Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
messengers/messenger-speech Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20, 126, 129
miracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
mystery Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
mystic initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20, 26
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
nymph Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
nysa, nyseion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
olbia/pontic olbia, olbian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
on stage Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
orpheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
orphism, orphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
pallas (deity) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 216
parody Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
pentheus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 216; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26, 49, 126, 129
philosophy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
physis Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
pottery Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
prologue/expository opening Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
reception, of dramatic conventions Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126, 129
refiguration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26, 49
resemblances, bassarae/bassarides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
resemblances, edonoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20, 26, 49
resemblances, pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20
resemblances, reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126, 129
resemblances, xantriae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20
rite, ritual, maenadic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
rome, roman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
satyr drama, satyr-play Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
semele Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
sexuality , maenadism and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 216
sophia/sophos (wisdom) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
sparagmos Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112; Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 169
sōphrosynē/sōphrōn Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
tarpeia Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 216
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
thebes (boeotia) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
theologos (iohannes) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
theomachos (–oi)/theomachia/theomachein Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
theotokos (mother of god) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
thunder/thunderbolt Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 20
tragedy, tragic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
transformation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26
transmission Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26
ulysses/odysseus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 216
vergil, aeneid, statius achilleid and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 216
versnel, h. s. Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 169
wine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
woman' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
women Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
young womens rituals, in statius achilleid, amazons, association with Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 216
young womens rituals, in statius achilleid, bacchic rites Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 216
young womens rituals, in statius achilleid, dance rituals Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 216
young womens rituals, in statius achilleid, pallas, association with Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 216
young womens rituals, in statius achilleid, physicality/masculinity of achilles and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 216
young womens rituals, in statius achilleid, shield, achilles attraction to Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 216
young womens rituals, in statius achilleid Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 216