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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5614
Euripides, Bacchae, 676-828


γυναιξὶ τόνδε τῇ δίκῃ προσθήσομεν. Ἄγγελοςthe more I will punish this one here who taught the women these tricks. Messenger


ἀγελαῖα μὲν βοσκήματʼ ἄρτι πρὸς λέπαςMESSENGER: I was just driving the herds of kine to a ridge of the hill as I fed them, as the sun shot forth his rays and made the earth grow warm; when lo! I see three revel-bands of women; Autonoe was chief of one, thy mother Agave of the second, while Ino's was the third. There they lay asleep, all tired out; some were resting on branches of the pine, others had laid their heads in careless ease on oak-leaves piled upon the ground, observing all modesty; not, as thou sayest, seeking to gratify their lusts alone amid the woods, by wine and soft flute-music maddened. Anon in their midst thy mother uprose and cried aloud to wake them from their sleep, when she heard the lowing of my horned kine. And up they started to their feet, brushing from their eyes sleep's quickening dew, a wondrous sight of grace and modesty, young and old and maidens yet unwed. First o'er their shoulders they let stream their hair; then all did gird their fawn-skins up, who hitherto had left the fastenings loose, girdling the dappled hides with snakes that licked their cheeks. Others fondled in their arms gazelles or savage whelps of wolves, and suckled them-young mothers these with babes at home, whose breasts were still full of milk; crowns they wore of ivy or of oak or blossoming convolvulus.


ἀγελαῖα μὲν βοσκήματʼ ἄρτι πρὸς λέπαςThe herds of grazing cattle were just climbing up the hill, at the time when the sun sends forth its rays, warming the earth.


μόσχων ὑπεξήκριζον, ἡνίχʼ ἥλιοςThe herds of grazing cattle were just climbing up the hill, at the time when the sun sends forth its rays, warming the earth.


ἀκτῖνας ἐξίησι θερμαίνων χθόνα.The herds of grazing cattle were just climbing up the hill, at the time when the sun sends forth its rays, warming the earth.


ὁρῶ δὲ θιάσους τρεῖς γυναικείων χορῶνI saw three companies of dancing women, one of which Autonoe led, the second your mother Agave, and the third Ino. All were asleep, their bodies relaxed, some resting their backs against pine foliage


ὧν ἦρχʼ ἑνὸς μὲν Αὐτονόη, τοῦ δευτέρουI saw three companies of dancing women, one of which Autonoe led, the second your mother Agave, and the third Ino. All were asleep, their bodies relaxed, some resting their backs against pine foliage


μήτηρ Ἀγαύη σή, τρίτου δʼ Ἰνὼ χοροῦ.I saw three companies of dancing women, one of which Autonoe led, the second your mother Agave, and the third Ino. All were asleep, their bodies relaxed, some resting their backs against pine foliage


ηὗδον δὲ πᾶσαι σώμασιν παρειμέναιI saw three companies of dancing women, one of which Autonoe led, the second your mother Agave, and the third Ino. All were asleep, their bodies relaxed, some resting their backs against pine foliage


αἳ μὲν πρὸς ἐλάτης νῶτʼ ἐρείσασαι φόβηνI saw three companies of dancing women, one of which Autonoe led, the second your mother Agave, and the third Ino. All were asleep, their bodies relaxed, some resting their backs against pine foliage


αἳ δʼ ἐν δρυὸς φύλλοισι πρὸς πέδῳ κάραothers laying their heads at random on the oak leaves, modestly, not as you say drunk with the goblet and the sound of the flute, hunting out Aphrodite through the woods in solitude.Your mother raised a cry


εἰκῇ βαλοῦσαι σωφρόνως, οὐχ ὡς σὺ φῂςothers laying their heads at random on the oak leaves, modestly, not as you say drunk with the goblet and the sound of the flute, hunting out Aphrodite through the woods in solitude.Your mother raised a cry


ᾠνωμένας κρατῆρι καὶ λωτοῦ ψόφῳothers laying their heads at random on the oak leaves, modestly, not as you say drunk with the goblet and the sound of the flute, hunting out Aphrodite through the woods in solitude.Your mother raised a cry


θηρᾶν καθʼ ὕλην Κύπριν ἠρημωμένας.others laying their heads at random on the oak leaves, modestly, not as you say drunk with the goblet and the sound of the flute, hunting out Aphrodite through the woods in solitude.Your mother raised a cry


nanothers laying their heads at random on the oak leaves, modestly, not as you say drunk with the goblet and the sound of the flute, hunting out Aphrodite through the woods in solitude.Your mother raised a cry


σταθεῖσα βάκχαις, ἐξ ὕπνου κινεῖν δέμαςtanding up in the midst of the Bacchae, to wake their bodies from sleep, when she heard the lowing of the horned cattle. And they, casting off refreshing sleep from their eyes, sprang upright, a marvel of orderliness to behold, old, young, and still unmarried virgins.


μυκήμαθʼ ὡς ἤκουσε κεροφόρων βοῶν.tanding up in the midst of the Bacchae, to wake their bodies from sleep, when she heard the lowing of the horned cattle. And they, casting off refreshing sleep from their eyes, sprang upright, a marvel of orderliness to behold, old, young, and still unmarried virgins.


αἳ δʼ ἀποβαλοῦσαι θαλερὸν ὀμμάτων ὕπνονtanding up in the midst of the Bacchae, to wake their bodies from sleep, when she heard the lowing of the horned cattle. And they, casting off refreshing sleep from their eyes, sprang upright, a marvel of orderliness to behold, old, young, and still unmarried virgins.


ἀνῇξαν ὀρθαί, θαῦμʼ ἰδεῖν εὐκοσμίαςtanding up in the midst of the Bacchae, to wake their bodies from sleep, when she heard the lowing of the horned cattle. And they, casting off refreshing sleep from their eyes, sprang upright, a marvel of orderliness to behold, old, young, and still unmarried virgins.


νέαι παλαιαὶ παρθένοι τʼ ἔτʼ ἄζυγες.tanding up in the midst of the Bacchae, to wake their bodies from sleep, when she heard the lowing of the horned cattle. And they, casting off refreshing sleep from their eyes, sprang upright, a marvel of orderliness to behold, old, young, and still unmarried virgins.


καὶ πρῶτα μὲν καθεῖσαν εἰς ὤμους κόμαςFirst they let their hair loose over their shoulders, and secured their fawn-skins, as many of them as had released the fastenings of their knots, girding the dappled hides with serpents licking their jaws. And some, holding in their arms a gazelle or wild


νεβρίδας τʼ ἀνεστείλανθʼ ὅσαισιν ἁμμάτωνFirst they let their hair loose over their shoulders, and secured their fawn-skins, as many of them as had released the fastenings of their knots, girding the dappled hides with serpents licking their jaws. And some, holding in their arms a gazelle or wild


σύνδεσμʼ ἐλέλυτο, καὶ καταστίκτους δορὰςFirst they let their hair loose over their shoulders, and secured their fawn-skins, as many of them as had released the fastenings of their knots, girding the dappled hides with serpents licking their jaws. And some, holding in their arms a gazelle or wild


ὄφεσι κατεζώσαντο λιχμῶσιν γένυν.First they let their hair loose over their shoulders, and secured their fawn-skins, as many of them as had released the fastenings of their knots, girding the dappled hides with serpents licking their jaws. And some, holding in their arms a gazelle or wild


αἳ δʼ ἀγκάλαισι δορκάδʼ ἢ σκύμνους λύκωνFirst they let their hair loose over their shoulders, and secured their fawn-skins, as many of them as had released the fastenings of their knots, girding the dappled hides with serpents licking their jaws. And some, holding in their arms a gazelle or wild


ἀγρίους ἔχουσαι λευκὸν ἐδίδοσαν γάλαwolf-pup, gave them white milk, as many as had abandoned their new-born infants and had their breasts still swollen. They put on garlands of ivy, and oak, and flowering yew. One took her thyrsos and struck it against a rock


ὅσαις νεοτόκοις μαστὸς ἦν σπαργῶν ἔτιwolf-pup, gave them white milk, as many as had abandoned their new-born infants and had their breasts still swollen. They put on garlands of ivy, and oak, and flowering yew. One took her thyrsos and struck it against a rock


βρέφη λιπούσαις· ἐπὶ δʼ ἔθεντο κισσίνουςwolf-pup, gave them white milk, as many as had abandoned their new-born infants and had their breasts still swollen. They put on garlands of ivy, and oak, and flowering yew. One took her thyrsos and struck it against a rock


στεφάνους δρυός τε μίλακός τʼ ἀνθεσφόρου.wolf-pup, gave them white milk, as many as had abandoned their new-born infants and had their breasts still swollen. They put on garlands of ivy, and oak, and flowering yew. One took her thyrsos and struck it against a rock


θύρσον δέ τις λαβοῦσʼ ἔπαισεν ἐς πέτρανAnd one took her thyrsus and struck it into a rock, and forth there gushed a limpid spring; and another plunged her wand into the lap of earth and there the god sent up a fount of wine; and all who wished for draughts of milk had but to scratch the soil with their finger-tips and there they had it in abundance, while from every ivy-wreathed staff sweet rills of honey trickled. Hadst thou been there and seen this, thou wouldst have turned to pray to the god, whom now thou dost disparage. Anon we herdsmen and shepherds met to discuss their strange and wondrous doings; then one, who wandereth oft to town and hath a trick of speech, made harangue in the midst, "O ye who dwell upon the hallowed mountain-terraces!


θύρσον δέ τις λαβοῦσʼ ἔπαισεν ἐς πέτρανwolf-pup, gave them white milk, as many as had abandoned their new-born infants and had their breasts still swollen. They put on garlands of ivy, and oak, and flowering yew. One took her thyrsos and struck it against a rock


ὅθεν δροσώδης ὕδατος ἐκπηδᾷ νοτίς·from which a dewy stream of water sprang forth. Another let her thyrsos strike the ground, and there the god sent forth a fountain of wine. All who desired the white drink scratched the earth with the tips of their fingers and obtained streams of milk;


ἄλλη δὲ νάρθηκʼ ἐς πέδον καθῆκε γῆςfrom which a dewy stream of water sprang forth. Another let her thyrsos strike the ground, and there the god sent forth a fountain of wine. All who desired the white drink scratched the earth with the tips of their fingers and obtained streams of milk;


καὶ τῇδε κρήνην ἐξανῆκʼ οἴνου θεός·from which a dewy stream of water sprang forth. Another let her thyrsos strike the ground, and there the god sent forth a fountain of wine. All who desired the white drink scratched the earth with the tips of their fingers and obtained streams of milk;


ὅσαις δὲ λευκοῦ πώματος πόθος παρῆνfrom which a dewy stream of water sprang forth. Another let her thyrsos strike the ground, and there the god sent forth a fountain of wine. All who desired the white drink scratched the earth with the tips of their fingers and obtained streams of milk;


ἄκροισι δακτύλοισι διαμῶσαι χθόναfrom which a dewy stream of water sprang forth. Another let her thyrsos strike the ground, and there the god sent forth a fountain of wine. All who desired the white drink scratched the earth with the tips of their fingers and obtained streams of milk;


γάλακτος ἑσμοὺς εἶχον· ἐκ δὲ κισσίνωνand a sweet flow of honey dripped from their ivy thyrsoi; so that, had you been present and seen this, you would have approached with prayers the god whom you now blame.We herdsmen and shepherds gathered in order to


θύρσων γλυκεῖαι μέλιτος ἔσταζον ῥοαί.and a sweet flow of honey dripped from their ivy thyrsoi; so that, had you been present and seen this, you would have approached with prayers the god whom you now blame.We herdsmen and shepherds gathered in order to


ὥστʼ, εἰ παρῆσθα, τὸν θεὸν τὸν νῦν ψέγειςand a sweet flow of honey dripped from their ivy thyrsoi; so that, had you been present and seen this, you would have approached with prayers the god whom you now blame.We herdsmen and shepherds gathered in order to


εὐχαῖσιν ἂν μετῆλθες εἰσιδὼν τάδε.and a sweet flow of honey dripped from their ivy thyrsoi; so that, had you been present and seen this, you would have approached with prayers the god whom you now blame.We herdsmen and shepherds gathered in order to


nanand a sweet flow of honey dripped from their ivy thyrsoi; so that, had you been present and seen this, you would have approached with prayers the god whom you now blame.We herdsmen and shepherds gathered in order to


κοινῶν λόγων δώσοντες ἀλλήλοις ἔρινdebate with one another concerning what strange and amazing things they were doing. Some one, a wanderer about the city and practised in speaking, said to us all: You who inhabit the holy plains of the mountains, do you wish to hunt


ὡς δεινὰ δρῶσι θαυμάτων τʼ ἐπάξια·debate with one another concerning what strange and amazing things they were doing. Some one, a wanderer about the city and practised in speaking, said to us all: You who inhabit the holy plains of the mountains, do you wish to hunt


καί τις πλάνης κατʼ ἄστυ καὶ τρίβων λόγωνdebate with one another concerning what strange and amazing things they were doing. Some one, a wanderer about the city and practised in speaking, said to us all: You who inhabit the holy plains of the mountains, do you wish to hunt


ἔλεξεν εἰς ἅπαντας· Ὦ σεμνὰς πλάκαςdebate with one another concerning what strange and amazing things they were doing. Some one, a wanderer about the city and practised in speaking, said to us all: You who inhabit the holy plains of the mountains, do you wish to hunt


ναίοντες ὀρέων, θέλετε θηρασώμεθαdebate with one another concerning what strange and amazing things they were doing. Some one, a wanderer about the city and practised in speaking, said to us all: You who inhabit the holy plains of the mountains, do you wish to hunt


Πενθέως Ἀγαύην μητέρʼ ἐκ βακχευμάτωνhall we chase Agave, mother of Pentheus, from her Bacchic rites, and thereby do our prince a service?" We liked his speech, and placed ourselves in hidden ambush among the leafy thickets; they at the appointed time began to wave the thyrsus for their Bacchic rites, calling on Iacchus, the Bromian god, the son of Zeus, in united chorus, and the whole mount and the wild creatures re-echoed their cry; all nature stirred as they rushed on. Now Agave chanced to come springing near me, so up I leapt from out my ambush where I lay concealed, meaning to seize her. But she cried out, "What ho! my nimble hounds, here are men upon our track; but follow me, ay, follow, with the thyrsus in your hand for weapon." Thereat we fled, to escape being torn in pieces by the Bacchantes; but they, with hands that bore no weapon of steel, attacked our cattle as they browsed. Then wouldst thou have seen Agave mastering some sleek lowing calf, while others rent the heifers limb from limb. Before thy eyes there would have been hurling of ribs and hoofs this way and that; and strips of flesh, all blood-bedabbled, dripped as they hung from the pine-branches. Wild bulls, that glared but now with rage along their horns, found themselves tripped up, dragged down to earth by countless maidens' hands. The flesh upon their limbs was stripped therefrom quicker than thou couldst have closed thy royal eye-lids.


Πενθέως Ἀγαύην μητέρʼ ἐκ βακχευμάτωνPentheus’ mother Agave out from the Bacchic revelry and do the king a favor? We thought he spoke well, and lay down in ambush, hiding ourselves in the foliage of bushes. They, at the appointed hour, began to wave the thyrsos in their revelries


χάριν τʼ ἄνακτι θώμεθα; εὖ δʼ ἡμῖν λέγεινPentheus’ mother Agave out from the Bacchic revelry and do the king a favor? We thought he spoke well, and lay down in ambush, hiding ourselves in the foliage of bushes. They, at the appointed hour, began to wave the thyrsos in their revelries


ἔδοξε, θάμνων δʼ ἐλλοχίζομεν φόβαιςPentheus’ mother Agave out from the Bacchic revelry and do the king a favor? We thought he spoke well, and lay down in ambush, hiding ourselves in the foliage of bushes. They, at the appointed hour, began to wave the thyrsos in their revelries


κρύψαντες αὑτούς· αἳ δὲ τὴν τεταγμένηνPentheus’ mother Agave out from the Bacchic revelry and do the king a favor? We thought he spoke well, and lay down in ambush, hiding ourselves in the foliage of bushes. They, at the appointed hour, began to wave the thyrsos in their revelries


ὥραν ἐκίνουν θύρσον ἐς βακχεύματαPentheus’ mother Agave out from the Bacchic revelry and do the king a favor? We thought he spoke well, and lay down in ambush, hiding ourselves in the foliage of bushes. They, at the appointed hour, began to wave the thyrsos in their revelries


Ἴακχον ἀθρόῳ στόματι τὸν Διὸς γόνονcalling on Iacchus, the son of Zeus, Bromius, with united voice. The whole mountain revelled along with them and the beasts, and nothing was unmoved by their running. Agave happened to be leaping near me, and I sprang forth, wanting to snatch her


Βρόμιον καλοῦσαι· πᾶν δὲ συνεβάκχευʼ ὄροςcalling on Iacchus, the son of Zeus, Bromius, with united voice. The whole mountain revelled along with them and the beasts, and nothing was unmoved by their running. Agave happened to be leaping near me, and I sprang forth, wanting to snatch her


καὶ θῆρες, οὐδὲν δʼ ἦν ἀκίνητον δρόμῳ.calling on Iacchus, the son of Zeus, Bromius, with united voice. The whole mountain revelled along with them and the beasts, and nothing was unmoved by their running. Agave happened to be leaping near me, and I sprang forth, wanting to snatch her


nancalling on Iacchus, the son of Zeus, Bromius, with united voice. The whole mountain revelled along with them and the beasts, and nothing was unmoved by their running. Agave happened to be leaping near me, and I sprang forth, wanting to snatch her


κἀγὼ ʼξεπήδησʼ ὡς συναρπάσαι θέλωνcalling on Iacchus, the son of Zeus, Bromius, with united voice. The whole mountain revelled along with them and the beasts, and nothing was unmoved by their running. Agave happened to be leaping near me, and I sprang forth, wanting to snatch her


λόχμην κενώσας ἔνθʼ ἐκρυπτόμην δέμας.abandoning the ambush where I had hidden myself. But she cried out: O my fleet hounds, we are hunted by these men; but follow me! follow armed with your thyrsoi in your hands! We fled and escaped


ἣ δʼ ἀνεβόησεν· Ὦ δρομάδες ἐμαὶ κύνεςabandoning the ambush where I had hidden myself. But she cried out: O my fleet hounds, we are hunted by these men; but follow me! follow armed with your thyrsoi in your hands! We fled and escaped


θηρώμεθʼ ἀνδρῶν τῶνδʼ ὕπʼ· ἀλλʼ ἕπεσθέ μοιabandoning the ambush where I had hidden myself. But she cried out: O my fleet hounds, we are hunted by these men; but follow me! follow armed with your thyrsoi in your hands! We fled and escaped


ἕπεσθε θύρσοις διὰ χερῶν ὡπλισμέναι.abandoning the ambush where I had hidden myself. But she cried out: O my fleet hounds, we are hunted by these men; but follow me! follow armed with your thyrsoi in your hands! We fled and escaped


nanabandoning the ambush where I had hidden myself. But she cried out: O my fleet hounds, we are hunted by these men; but follow me! follow armed with your thyrsoi in your hands! We fled and escaped


βακχῶν σπαραγμόν, αἳ δὲ νεμομέναις χλόηνfrom being torn apart by the Bacchae, but they, with unarmed hands, sprang on the heifers browsing the grass. and you might see one rending asunder a fatted lowing calf, while others tore apart cows.


μόσχοις ἐπῆλθον χειρὸς ἀσιδήρου μέτα.from being torn apart by the Bacchae, but they, with unarmed hands, sprang on the heifers browsing the grass. and you might see one rending asunder a fatted lowing calf, while others tore apart cows.


καὶ τὴν μὲν ἂν προσεῖδες εὔθηλον πόρινfrom being torn apart by the Bacchae, but they, with unarmed hands, sprang on the heifers browsing the grass. and you might see one rending asunder a fatted lowing calf, while others tore apart cows.


μυκωμένην ἔχουσαν ἐν χεροῖν δίχαfrom being torn apart by the Bacchae, but they, with unarmed hands, sprang on the heifers browsing the grass. and you might see one rending asunder a fatted lowing calf, while others tore apart cows.


ἄλλαι δὲ δαμάλας διεφόρουν σπαράγμασιν.from being torn apart by the Bacchae, but they, with unarmed hands, sprang on the heifers browsing the grass. and you might see one rending asunder a fatted lowing calf, while others tore apart cows.


εἶδες δʼ ἂν ἢ πλεύρʼ ἢ δίχηλον ἔμβασινYou might see ribs or cloven hooves tossed here and there; caught in the trees they dripped, dabbled in gore. Bulls who before were fierce, and showed their fury with their horns, stumbled to the ground


ῥιπτόμενʼ ἄνω τε καὶ κάτω· κρεμαστὰ δὲYou might see ribs or cloven hooves tossed here and there; caught in the trees they dripped, dabbled in gore. Bulls who before were fierce, and showed their fury with their horns, stumbled to the ground


ἔσταζʼ ὑπʼ ἐλάταις ἀναπεφυρμένʼ αἵματι.You might see ribs or cloven hooves tossed here and there; caught in the trees they dripped, dabbled in gore. Bulls who before were fierce, and showed their fury with their horns, stumbled to the ground


ταῦροι δʼ ὑβρισταὶ κἀς κέρας θυμούμενοιYou might see ribs or cloven hooves tossed here and there; caught in the trees they dripped, dabbled in gore. Bulls who before were fierce, and showed their fury with their horns, stumbled to the ground


τὸ πρόσθεν ἐσφάλλοντο πρὸς γαῖαν δέμαςYou might see ribs or cloven hooves tossed here and there; caught in the trees they dripped, dabbled in gore. Bulls who before were fierce, and showed their fury with their horns, stumbled to the ground


μυριάσι χειρῶν ἀγόμενοι νεανίδων.dragged down by countless young hands. The garment of flesh was torn apart faster then you could blink your royal eyes. And like birds raised in their course, they proceeded along the level plains, which by the streams of the Asopu


θᾶσσον δὲ διεφοροῦντο σαρκὸς ἐνδυτὰdragged down by countless young hands. The garment of flesh was torn apart faster then you could blink your royal eyes. And like birds raised in their course, they proceeded along the level plains, which by the streams of the Asopu


ἢ σὲ ξυνάψαι βλέφαρα βασιλείοις κόραις.dragged down by countless young hands. The garment of flesh was torn apart faster then you could blink your royal eyes. And like birds raised in their course, they proceeded along the level plains, which by the streams of the Asopu


χωροῦσι δʼ ὥστʼ ὄρνιθες ἀρθεῖσαι δρόμῳThen off they sped, like birds that skim the air, to the plains beneath the hills, which bear a fruitful harvest for Thebes beside the waters of Asopus; to Hysiae and Erythrae, hamlets 'neath Cithaeron's peak, with fell intent, swooping on everything and scattering all pellmell; and they would snatch children from their homes; but all that they placed upon their shoulders, abode there firmly without being tied, and fell not to the dusky earth, not even brass or iron; and on their hair they carried fire and it burnt them not; but the country-folk rushed to arms, furious at being pillaged by Bacchanals; whereon ensued, O king, this wondrous spectacle. For though the ironshod dart would draw no blood from them, they with the thyrsus, which they hurled, caused many a wound and put their foes to utter rout, women chasing men, by some god's intervention. Then they returned to the place whence they had started, even to the springs the god had made to spout for them; and there washed off the blood, while serpents with their tongues were licking clean each gout from their cheeks. Wherefore, my lord and master, receive this deity, whoe'er he be, within the city; for, great as he is in all else, I have likewise heard men say, 'twas he that gave the vine to man, sorrow's antidote. Take wine away and Cypris flies, and every other human joy is dead.


χωροῦσι δʼ ὥστʼ ὄρνιθες ἀρθεῖσαι δρόμῳdragged down by countless young hands. The garment of flesh was torn apart faster then you could blink your royal eyes. And like birds raised in their course, they proceeded along the level plains, which by the streams of the Asopu


πεδίων ὑποτάσεις, αἳ παρʼ Ἀσωποῦ ῥοαῖςdragged down by countless young hands. The garment of flesh was torn apart faster then you could blink your royal eyes. And like birds raised in their course, they proceeded along the level plains, which by the streams of the Asopu


εὔκαρπον ἐκβάλλουσι Θηβαίων στάχυν·produce the bountiful Theban crop. And falling like soldiers upon Hysiae and Erythrae, towns situated below the rock of Kithairon, they turned everything upside down. They were snatching children from their homes;


Ὑσιάς τʼ Ἐρυθράς θʼ, αἳ Κιθαιρῶνος λέπαςproduce the bountiful Theban crop. And falling like soldiers upon Hysiae and Erythrae, towns situated below the rock of Kithairon, they turned everything upside down. They were snatching children from their homes;


νέρθεν κατῳκήκασιν, ὥστε πολέμιοιproduce the bountiful Theban crop. And falling like soldiers upon Hysiae and Erythrae, towns situated below the rock of Kithairon, they turned everything upside down. They were snatching children from their homes;


ἐπεσπεσοῦσαι πάντʼ ἄνω τε καὶ κάτωproduce the bountiful Theban crop. And falling like soldiers upon Hysiae and Erythrae, towns situated below the rock of Kithairon, they turned everything upside down. They were snatching children from their homes;


διέφερον· ἥρπαζον μὲν ἐκ δόμων τέκνα·produce the bountiful Theban crop. And falling like soldiers upon Hysiae and Erythrae, towns situated below the rock of Kithairon, they turned everything upside down. They were snatching children from their homes;


ὁπόσα δʼ ἐπʼ ὤμοις ἔθεσαν, οὐ δεσμῶν ὕποand whatever they put on their shoulders, whether bronze or iron, was not held on by bonds, nor did it fall to the ground. They carried fire on their locks, but it did not burn them. Some people in rage took up arms, being plundered by the Bacchae


προσείχετʼ οὐδʼ ἔπιπτεν ἐς μέλαν πέδονand whatever they put on their shoulders, whether bronze or iron, was not held on by bonds, nor did it fall to the ground. They carried fire on their locks, but it did not burn them. Some people in rage took up arms, being plundered by the Bacchae


οὐ χαλκός, οὐ σίδηρος· ἐπὶ δὲ βοστρύχοιςand whatever they put on their shoulders, whether bronze or iron, was not held on by bonds, nor did it fall to the ground. They carried fire on their locks, but it did not burn them. Some people in rage took up arms, being plundered by the Bacchae


πῦρ ἔφερον, οὐδʼ ἔκαιεν. οἳ δʼ ὀργῆς ὕποand whatever they put on their shoulders, whether bronze or iron, was not held on by bonds, nor did it fall to the ground. They carried fire on their locks, but it did not burn them. Some people in rage took up arms, being plundered by the Bacchae


ἐς ὅπλʼ ἐχώρουν φερόμενοι βακχῶν ὕπο·and whatever they put on their shoulders, whether bronze or iron, was not held on by bonds, nor did it fall to the ground. They carried fire on their locks, but it did not burn them. Some people in rage took up arms, being plundered by the Bacchae


οὗπερ τὸ δεινὸν ἦν θέαμʼ ἰδεῖν, ἄναξ.and the sight of this was terrible to behold, lord. For their pointed spears drew no blood, but the women, hurling the thyrsoi from their hands, kept wounding them and turned them to flight—women did this to men, not without the help of some god.


τοῖς μὲν γὰρ οὐχ ᾕμασσε λογχωτὸν βέλοςand the sight of this was terrible to behold, lord. For their pointed spears drew no blood, but the women, hurling the thyrsoi from their hands, kept wounding them and turned them to flight—women did this to men, not without the help of some god.


κεῖναι δὲ θύρσους ἐξανιεῖσαι χερῶνand the sight of this was terrible to behold, lord. For their pointed spears drew no blood, but the women, hurling the thyrsoi from their hands, kept wounding them and turned them to flight—women did this to men, not without the help of some god.


ἐτραυμάτιζον κἀπενώτιζον φυγῇand the sight of this was terrible to behold, lord. For their pointed spears drew no blood, but the women, hurling the thyrsoi from their hands, kept wounding them and turned them to flight—women did this to men, not without the help of some god.


γυναῖκες ἄνδρας, οὐκ ἄνευ θεῶν τινος.and the sight of this was terrible to behold, lord. For their pointed spears drew no blood, but the women, hurling the thyrsoi from their hands, kept wounding them and turned them to flight—women did this to men, not without the help of some god.


πάλιν δʼ ἐχώρουν ὅθεν ἐκίνησαν πόδαAnd they returned where they had come from, to the very fountains which the god had sent forth for them, and washed off the blood, and snakes cleaned the drops from the women’s cheeks with their tongues.Receive this god then, whoever he is


κρήνας ἐπʼ αὐτὰς ἃς ἀνῆκʼ αὐταῖς θεός.And they returned where they had come from, to the very fountains which the god had sent forth for them, and washed off the blood, and snakes cleaned the drops from the women’s cheeks with their tongues.Receive this god then, whoever he is


νίψαντο δʼ αἷμα, σταγόνα δʼ ἐκ παρηίδωνAnd they returned where they had come from, to the very fountains which the god had sent forth for them, and washed off the blood, and snakes cleaned the drops from the women’s cheeks with their tongues.Receive this god then, whoever he is


γλώσσῃ δράκοντες ἐξεφαίδρυνον χροός.And they returned where they had come from, to the very fountains which the god had sent forth for them, and washed off the blood, and snakes cleaned the drops from the women’s cheeks with their tongues.Receive this god then, whoever he is


nanAnd they returned where they had come from, to the very fountains which the god had sent forth for them, and washed off the blood, and snakes cleaned the drops from the women’s cheeks with their tongues.Receive this god then, whoever he is


δέχου πόλει τῇδʼ· ὡς τά τʼ ἄλλʼ ἐστὶν μέγαςinto this city, master. For he is great in other respects, and they say this too of him, as I hear, that he gives to mortals the vine that puts an end to grief. Without wine there is no longer Aphrodite or any other pleasant thing for men. Chorus Leader


κἀκεῖνό φασιν αὐτόν, ὡς ἐγὼ κλύωinto this city, master. For he is great in other respects, and they say this too of him, as I hear, that he gives to mortals the vine that puts an end to grief. Without wine there is no longer Aphrodite or any other pleasant thing for men. Chorus Leader


τὴν παυσίλυπον ἄμπελον δοῦναι βροτοῖς.into this city, master. For he is great in other respects, and they say this too of him, as I hear, that he gives to mortals the vine that puts an end to grief. Without wine there is no longer Aphrodite or any other pleasant thing for men. Chorus Leader


οἴνου δὲ μηκέτʼ ὄντος οὐκ ἔστιν Κύπριςinto this city, master. For he is great in other respects, and they say this too of him, as I hear, that he gives to mortals the vine that puts an end to grief. Without wine there is no longer Aphrodite or any other pleasant thing for men. Chorus Leader


οὐδʼ ἄλλο τερπνὸν οὐδὲν ἀνθρώποις ἔτι. Χορόςinto this city, master. For he is great in other respects, and they say this too of him, as I hear, that he gives to mortals the vine that puts an end to grief. Without wine there is no longer Aphrodite or any other pleasant thing for men. Chorus Leader


ταρβῶ μὲν εἰπεῖν τοὺς λόγους ἐλευθέρουςCHORUS: Though I fear to speak my mind with freedom in the presence of my king, still must I utter this; Dionysus yields to no deity in might. PENTHEUS: Already, look you! the presumption of these Bacchantes is upon us, swift as fire, a sad disgrace in the eyes of all Hellas. No time for hesitation now! away to the Electran gate! order a muster of all my men-at-arms, of those that mount fleet steeds, of all who brandish light bucklers, of archers too that make the bowstring twang; for I will march against the Bacchanals. By Heaven I this passes all, if we are to be thus treated by women. Exit MESSENGER. DIONYSUS: Still obdurate, O Pentheus, after hearing my words! In spite of all the evil treatment I am enduring from thee, still I warn thee of the sin of bearing arms against a god, and bid thee cease; for Bromius will not endure thy driving his votaries from the mountains where they revel.


ταρβῶ μὲν εἰπεῖν τοὺς λόγους ἐλευθέρουςI fear to speak freely to the king, but I will speak nevertheless: Dionysus is inferior to none of the gods. Pentheu


πρὸς τὸν τύραννον, ἀλλʼ ὅμως εἰρήσεται·I fear to speak freely to the king, but I will speak nevertheless: Dionysus is inferior to none of the gods. Pentheu


Διόνυσος ἥσσων οὐδενὸς θεῶν ἔφυ. ΠενθεύςI fear to speak freely to the king, but I will speak nevertheless: Dionysus is inferior to none of the gods. Pentheu


ἤδη τόδʼ ἐγγὺς ὥστε πῦρ ὑφάπτεταιAlready like fire does this insolence of the Bacchae blaze up, a great reproach for the Hellenes.


ὕβρισμα βακχῶν, ψόγος ἐς Ἕλληνας μέγας.Already like fire does this insolence of the Bacchae blaze up, a great reproach for the Hellenes.


ἀλλʼ οὐκ ὀκνεῖν δεῖ· στεῖχʼ ἐπʼ Ἠλέκτρας ἰὼνBut we must not hesitate. Go to the Electran gates, bid all the shield-bearers and riders of swift-footed horses to assemble, as well as all who brandish the light shield and pluck bowstrings with their hands, so that we can make an assault against


πύλας· κέλευε πάντας ἀσπιδηφόρουςBut we must not hesitate. Go to the Electran gates, bid all the shield-bearers and riders of swift-footed horses to assemble, as well as all who brandish the light shield and pluck bowstrings with their hands, so that we can make an assault against


ἵππων τʼ ἀπαντᾶν ταχυπόδων ἐπεμβάταςBut we must not hesitate. Go to the Electran gates, bid all the shield-bearers and riders of swift-footed horses to assemble, as well as all who brandish the light shield and pluck bowstrings with their hands, so that we can make an assault against


πέλτας θʼ ὅσοι πάλλουσι καὶ τόξων χερὶBut we must not hesitate. Go to the Electran gates, bid all the shield-bearers and riders of swift-footed horses to assemble, as well as all who brandish the light shield and pluck bowstrings with their hands, so that we can make an assault against


ψάλλουσι νευράς, ὡς ἐπιστρατεύσομενBut we must not hesitate. Go to the Electran gates, bid all the shield-bearers and riders of swift-footed horses to assemble, as well as all who brandish the light shield and pluck bowstrings with their hands, so that we can make an assault against


βάκχαισιν· οὐ γὰρ ἀλλʼ ὑπερβάλλει τάδεthe Bacchae. For it is indeed too much if we suffer what we are suffering at the hands of women. Dionysu


εἰ πρὸς γυναικῶν πεισόμεσθʼ ἃ πάσχομεν. Διόνυσοςthe Bacchae. For it is indeed too much if we suffer what we are suffering at the hands of women. Dionysu


πείθῃ μὲν οὐδέν, τῶν ἐμῶν λόγων κλύωνPentheus, though you hear my words, you obey not at all. Though I suffer ill at your hands, still I say that it is not right for you to raise arms against a god


Πενθεῦ· κακῶς δὲ πρὸς σέθεν πάσχων ὅμωςPentheus, though you hear my words, you obey not at all. Though I suffer ill at your hands, still I say that it is not right for you to raise arms against a god


οὔ φημι χρῆναί σʼ ὅπλʼ ἐπαίρεσθαι θεῷPentheus, though you hear my words, you obey not at all. Though I suffer ill at your hands, still I say that it is not right for you to raise arms against a god


ἀλλʼ ἡσυχάζειν· Βρόμιος οὐκ ἀνέξεταιbut to remain calm. Bromius will not allow you to remove the Bacchae from the joyful mountains. Pentheu


κινοῦντα βάκχας σʼ εὐίων ὀρῶν ἄπο. Πενθεύςbut to remain calm. Bromius will not allow you to remove the Bacchae from the joyful mountains. Pentheu


οὐ μὴ φρενώσεις μʼ, ἀλλὰ δέσμιος φυγὼνPENTHEUS: A truce to thy preaching to me! thou hast escaped thy bonds, preserve thy liberty; else will I renew thy punishment. DIONYSUS: I would rather do him sacrifice than in a fury kick against the pricks; thou a mortal, he a god. PENTHEUS: Sacrifice! that will I, by setting afoot a wholesale slaughter of women 'mid Cithaeron's glens, as they deserve. DIONYSUS: Ye will all be put to flight-a shameful thing that they with the Bacchic thyrsus should rout your mail-clad warriors. PENTHEUS: I find this stranger a troublesome foe to encounter; doing or suffering he is alike irrepressible. DIONYSUS: Friend, there is still a way to compose this bitterness. PENTHEUS: Say how; am I to serve my own servants? DIONYSUS: I will bring the women hither without weapons. PENTHEUS: Ha! ha! this is some crafty scheme of thine against me. DIONYSUS: What kind of scheme, if by my craft I purpose to save thee?


οὐ μὴ φρενώσεις μʼ, ἀλλὰ δέσμιος φυγὼνDo not instruct me, but be content in your escape from prison. Or shall I bring punishment upon you again? Dionysu


σῴσῃ τόδʼ; ἢ σοὶ πάλιν ἀναστρέψω δίκην; ΔιόνυσοςDo not instruct me, but be content in your escape from prison. Or shall I bring punishment upon you again? Dionysu


θύοιμʼ ἂν αὐτῷ μᾶλλον ἢ θυμούμενοςI would sacrifice to the god rather


πρὸς κέντρα λακτίζοιμι θνητὸς ὢν θεῷ. Πενθεύςthan kick against his spurs in anger, a mortal against a god. Pentheu


θύσω, φόνον γε θῆλυν, ὥσπερ ἄξιαιI will sacrifice, making a great slaughter of the women, as they deserve, in the glens of Kithairon. Dionysu


πολὺν ταράξας ἐν Κιθαιρῶνος πτυχαῖς. ΔιόνυσοςI will sacrifice, making a great slaughter of the women, as they deserve, in the glens of Kithairon. Dionysu


φεύξεσθε πάντες· καὶ τόδʼ αἰσχρόν, ἀσπίδαςYou will all flee. And it will be a source of shame that you turn your bronze shields away from the thyrsoi of the Bacchae. Pentheu


θύρσοισι βακχῶν ἐκτρέπειν χαλκηλάτους ΠενθεύςYou will all flee. And it will be a source of shame that you turn your bronze shields away from the thyrsoi of the Bacchae. Pentheu


ἀπόρῳ γε τῷδε συμπεπλέγμεθα ξένῳThis stranger with whom I am locked together is impossible, and neither suffering nor doing will he be quiet. Dionysu


ὃς οὔτε πάσχων οὔτε δρῶν σιγήσεται. ΔιόνυσοςThis stranger with whom I am locked together is impossible, and neither suffering nor doing will he be quiet. Dionysu


ὦ τᾶν, ἔτʼ ἔστιν εὖ καταστῆσαι τάδε. ΠενθεύςMy friend, there is still opportunity to arrange these things well. Pentheu


τί δρῶντα; δουλεύοντα δουλείαις ἐμαῖς; ΔιόνυσοςDoing what? Being a slave to my slaves? Dionysu


ἐγὼ γυναῖκας δεῦρʼ ὅπλων ἄξω δίχα. ΠενθεύςWithout weapons I will bring the women here. Pentheu


οἴμοι· τόδʼ ἤδη δόλιον ἔς με μηχανᾷ. ΔιόνυσοςAlas! You are contriving this as a trick against me. Dionysu


ποῖόν τι, σῷσαί σʼ εἰ θέλω τέχναις ἐμαῖς; ΠενθεύςPENTHEUS: You have combined with them to form this plot, that your revels may on for ever. DIONYSUS: Nay, but this is the compact I made with the god; be sure of that. PENTHEUS: Preparing to start forth Bring forth my arms. Not another word from thee! DIONYSUS: Ha! wouldst thou see them seated on the hills? PENTHEUS: Of all things, yes! I would give untold sums for that. DIONYSUS: Why this sudden, strong desire? PENTHEUS: 'Twill be a bitter sight, if I find them drunk with wine. DIONYSUS: And would that be a pleasant sight which will prove bitter to thee? PENTHEUS: Believe me, yes! beneath the fir-trees as I sit in silence. DIONYSUS: Nay, they will track thee, though thou come secretly.


ποῖόν τι, σῷσαί σʼ εἰ θέλω τέχναις ἐμαῖς; ΠενθεύςWhat sort, if I wish to save you by my contrivances? Pentheu


ξυνέθεσθε κοινῇ τάδʼ, ἵνα βακχεύητʼ ἀεί. ΔιόνυσοςYou have devised this together, so that you may have your revelry forever. Dionysu


καὶ μὴν ξυνεθέμην—τοῦτό γʼ ἔστι—τῷ θεῷ. ΠενθεύςI certainly did—that is so—with the god. Pentheu


ἐκφέρετέ μοι δεῦρʼ ὅπλα, σὺ δὲ παῦσαι λέγων. ΔιόνυσοςTo a servant Bring me my armor. To Dionysus And you, stop speaking. Dionysu


ἆ.Ah! Do you wish to see them sitting together in the mountains? Pentheu


βούλῃ σφʼ ἐν ὄρεσι συγκαθημένας ἰδεῖν; ΠενθεύςAh! Do you wish to see them sitting together in the mountains? Pentheu


μάλιστα, μυρίον γε δοὺς χρυσοῦ σταθμόν. ΔιόνυσοςCertainly. I’d give an enormous amount of gold for that. Dionysu


τί δʼ εἰς ἔρωτα τοῦδε πέπτωκας μέγαν; ΠενθεύςWhy do you desire this so badly? Pentheu


λυπρῶς νιν εἰσίδοιμʼ ἂν ἐξῳνωμένας. ΔιόνυσοςI would be sorry to see them in their drunkenness. Dionysu


ὅμως δʼ ἴδοις ἂν ἡδέως ἅ σοι πικρά; ΠενθεύςBut would you see gladly what is grievous to you? Pentheu


σάφʼ ἴσθι, σιγῇ γʼ ὑπʼ ἐλάταις καθήμενος. ΔιόνυσοςTo be sure, sitting quietly under the pines. Dionysu


ἀλλʼ ἐξιχνεύσουσίν σε, κἂν ἔλθῃς λάθρᾳ. ΠενθεύςBut they will track you down, even if you go in secret. Pentheu


ἀλλʼ ἐμφανῶς· καλῶς γὰρ ἐξεῖπας τάδε. ΔιόνυσοςPENTHEUS: Well, I will go openly; thou wert right to say so. DIONYSUS: Am I to be thy guide? wilt thou essay the road? PENTHEUS: Lead on with all speed, I grudge thee all delay. DIONYSUS: Array thee then in robes of fine linen. PENTHEUS: Why so? Am I to enlist among women after being a man? DIONYSUS: They may kill thee, if thou show thy manhood there. PENTHEUS: Well said! Thou hast given me a taste of thy wit already. DIONYSUS: Dionysus schooled me in this lore. PENTHEUS: How am I to carry out thy wholesome advice? DIONYSUS: Myself will enter thy palace and robe thee. PENTHEUS: What is the robe to be? a woman's? Nay, I am ashamed. DIONYSUS: Thy eagerness to see the Maenads goes no further. PENTHEUS: But what dress dost say thou wilt robe me in? DIONYSUS: Upon thy head will I make thy hair grow long. PENTHEUS: Describe my costume further. DIONYSUS: Thou wilt wear a robe reaching to thy feet; and on thy head shall be a snood. PENTHEUS: Wilt add aught else to my attire? DIONYSUS: A thyrsus in thy hand, and a dappled fawnskin. PENTHEUS: I can never put on woman's dress. DIONYSUS: Then wilt thou cause bloodshed by coming to blows with the Bacchanals.


ἀλλʼ ἐμφανῶς· καλῶς γὰρ ἐξεῖπας τάδε. ΔιόνυσοςYou are right: I will go openly. Dionysu


ἄγωμεν οὖν σε κἀπιχειρήσεις ὁδῷ; ΠενθεύςShall I guide you? Will you attempt the journey? Pentheu


ἄγʼ ὡς τάχιστα, τοῦ χρόνου δέ σοι φθονῶ. ΔιόνυσοςLead me as quickly as possible. I grudge you the time. Dionysu


στεῖλαί νυν ἀμφὶ χρωτὶ βυσσίνους πέπλους. ΠενθεύςPut linen clothes on your body then. Pentheu


τί δὴ τόδʼ; ἐς γυναῖκας ἐξ ἀνδρὸς τελῶ; ΔιόνυσοςWhat is this? Shall I then, instead of a man, be reckoned among the women? Dionysu


μή σε κτάνωσιν, ἢν ἀνὴρ ὀφθῇς ἐκεῖ. ΠενθεύςLest they kill you if you are seen there as a man. Pentheu


εὖ γʼ εἶπας αὖ τόδʼ· ὥς τις εἶ πάλαι σοφός. ΔιόνυσοςAgain you speak correctly: how wise you have been all along! Dionysu


Διόνυσος ἡμᾶς ἐξεμούσωσεν τάδε. ΠενθεύςDionysus taught me these things fully. Pentheu


πῶς οὖν γένοιτʼ ἂν ἃ σύ με νουθετεῖς καλῶς; ΔιόνυσοςHow can your advice to me be well carried out? Dionysu


ἐγὼ στελῶ σε δωμάτων ἔσω μολών. ΠενθεύςI will go inside and dress you. Pentheu


τίνα στολήν; ἦ θῆλυν; ἀλλʼ αἰδώς μʼ ἔχει. ΔιόνυσοςIn what clothing? Female? But shame holds me back. Dionysu


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 10.334 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

10.334. /that on those horses no other man of the Trojans shall mount, but it is thou, I declare, that shalt have glory in them continually. So spake he, and swore thereto an idle oath, and stirred the heart of Dolon. Forthwith then he cast about his shoulders his curved bow, and thereover clad him in the skin of a grey wolf
2. Euripides, Bacchae, 1001-1023, 1150-1152, 1159, 1331, 234-236, 312-317, 389-392, 434-491, 493-494, 498-502, 506-507, 511-514, 518, 576-656, 664-671, 677-861, 918-922, 977-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1000. παρακόπῳ τε λήματι στέλλεται 1000. and mad disposition violently to overcome by force what is invincible—death is the discipline for his purposes, accepting no excuses when the affairs of the gods are concerned; to act like a mortal—this is a life that is free from pain. The text and meaning of these and the following lines are highly uncertain. The above translation is based on the paraphrase that Murray includes in his apparatus qui iniuste etc. (v. 997), ei sententiarum castigatrix in rebus divinis indeprecabilis Mors est .
3. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 362-363, 361 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Hippolytus, 181-185, 275, 516, 530, 1300 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1300. as well the frenzy, and, in a sense, the nobleness of thy wife; for she was cruelly stung with a passion for thy son by that goddess whom all we, that joy in virgin purity, detest. And though she strove to conquer love by resolution
5. Euripides, Ion, 30 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

30. that dwell in glorious Athens, for well thou knowest Athena’s city, and take a new-born babe from out the hollow rock, his cradle and his swaddling-clothes as well, and bear him to my prophetic shrine at Delphi, and set him at the entering-in of my temple.
6. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 40 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Rhesus, 209, 208 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

208. A grey wolf’s hide
8. Theocritus, Idylls, 11.1, 11.15 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

9. Eratosthenes, Catasterismi, 24 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

10. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 2.29.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Longus, Daphnis And Chloe, 1.14.1, 1.15.2, 1.20.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles tatius Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 634
aeschylus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
agave Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
callimachus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 634
chorus (male, female), of a. bassarae or bassarides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
christus patiens, a drama for reading Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
cithaeron Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126, 129
colloquialisms Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
concepts/values/beliefs Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26, 129
delphi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
dionysus, as a bull/his bestial incarnation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
dionysus, effeminate/effeminacy of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26
dionysus, epiphanies/theophany of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
dionysus, illusion Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
dionysus, paradoxes/contradictions Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26
ecstasy/ecstasis Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
euripides, bacchae Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 634; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49, 129
euripides, heracles Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 634
euripides, hippolytus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 634
euripides, in longus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 634
euripides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126, 129
hallucination/delusion Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
hubris Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
hēsychia/calm life/quietism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
initiands/initiates/initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26
interrogation (-scene) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26
lycurgus, and pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26
lycurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
madness (mania)/frenzy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
maenads/maenadism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26, 49, 129
messengers/messenger-speech Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126, 129
mystery Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
mystic initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26
on stage Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
orpheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
parody Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26, 49, 126, 129
physis Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
prologue/expository opening Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
reception, of dramatic conventions Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126, 129
refiguration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26, 49
resemblances, bassarae/bassarides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
resemblances, edonoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26, 49
resemblances, reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126, 129
sophia/sophos (wisdom) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
sōphrosynē/sōphrōn Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
theocritus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 634
theologos (iohannes) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
theomachos (–oi)/theomachia/theomachein Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
theotokos (mother of god) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
tragedy, longus reception of Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 634
transformation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26
transmission' Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 26