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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5614
Euripides, Bacchae, 526-529


Ἴθι, Διθύραμβʼ, ἐμὰν ἄρσενα word split in text crying out: Go, Dithyrambus, enter this my male womb. I will make you illustrious, Bacchus, in Thebes , so that they will call you by this name.


τάνδε βᾶθι νηδύν·crying out: Go, Dithyrambus, enter this my male womb. I will make you illustrious, Bacchus, in Thebes , so that they will call you by this name.


ἀναφαίνω σε τόδʼ, ὦ Βάκχιε, word split in text crying out: Go, Dithyrambus, enter this my male womb. I will make you illustrious, Bacchus, in Thebes , so that they will call you by this name.


Θήβαις ὀνομάζειν.crying out: Go, Dithyrambus, enter this my male womb. I will make you illustrious, Bacchus, in Thebes , so that they will call you by this name.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

41 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 4.1 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4.1. וַיֹּאמֶר מֶה עָשִׂיתָ קוֹל דְּמֵי אָחִיךָ צֹעֲקִים אֵלַי מִן־הָאֲדָמָה׃ 4.1. וְהָאָדָם יָדַע אֶת־חַוָּה אִשְׁתּוֹ וַתַּהַר וַתֵּלֶד אֶת־קַיִן וַתֹּאמֶר קָנִיתִי אִישׁ אֶת־יְהוָה׃ 4.1. And the man knew Eve his wife; and she conceived and bore Cain, and said: ‘I have agotten a man with the help of the LORD.’"
2. Homer, Iliad, 1.354, 5.742 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.354. /Earnestly he prayed to his dear mother with hands outstretched:Mother, since you bore me, though to so brief a span of life, honour surely ought the Olympian to have given into my hands, Zeus who thunders on high; but now he has honoured me not a bit. Truly the son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon 5.742. /and therein is Strife, therein Valour, and therein Onset, that maketh the blood run cold, and therein is the head of the dread monster, the Gorgon, dread and awful, a portent of Zeus that beareth the aegis. And upon her head she set the helmet with two horns and with bosses four, wrought of gold, and fitted with the men-at-arms of an hundred cities.
3. Homer, Odyssey, 9.175-9.176 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 146 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

146. q rend= 146. q type=
5. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 24 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

24. Βρόμιος ἔχει τὸν χῶρον, οὐδʼ ἀμνημονῶ
6. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 101-147, 78-100 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. ἀκούετʼ ἢ οὐκ ἀκούετʼ ἀσπίδων κτύπον; 100. Do you hear the clash of shields, or does it escape you? When, if not now, shall we place sacred robes and wreaths on the statues to accompany our prayers? I see the clash—it is not the clatter of a single spear. What will you do? Will you betray
7. Pindar, Paeanes, 3.8-3.58 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 248-253, 247 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

247. καὶ μὴν καλόν γ' ἔστ': ὦ Διόνυσε δέσποτα
9. Aristophanes, Frogs, 324-325, 341, 399, 404, 410, 416, 320 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

320. ᾄδουσι γοῦν τὸν ̓́Ιακχον ὅνπερ Διαγόρας.
10. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 991, 990 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

990. εὔιον ὦ Διόνυσε
11. Aristophanes, Wasps, 874 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

874. ἰήιε Παιάν.
12. Euripides, Bacchae, 101-102, 1020, 103, 1031, 1037, 104, 115, 1153, 1250, 140, 157, 20, 201, 21-22, 228, 234, 241-246, 286-297, 329, 375, 39, 4, 40-41, 412-413, 42, 446, 519-525, 527-546, 550-575, 579, 582, 592, 629, 66-68, 725-726, 777, 790, 84, 87-97, 976, 98-99, 995-996, 998, 100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. τέλεσαν, ταυρόκερων θεὸν 100. had perfected him, the bull-horned god, and he crowned him with crowns of snakes, for which reason Maenads cloak their wild prey over their locks. Choru
13. Euripides, Cyclops, 123, 620, 63, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. ̓͂Ω Βρόμιε, διὰ σὲ μυρίους ἔχω πόνους
14. Euripides, Helen, 1365 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1365. ῳ καὶ παννυχίδες θεᾶς. 1365. and the night-long festivals of the goddess. . . . You gloried in your beauty alone. Helen
15. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 682 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Euripides, Ion, 216 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 785, 806, 649 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. Herodotus, Histories, 2.146, 8.65 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.146. With regard to these two, Pan and Dionysus, one may follow whatever story one thinks most credible; but I give my own opinion concerning them here. Had Dionysus son of Semele and Pan son of Penelope appeared in Hellas and lived there to old age, like Heracles the son of Amphitryon, it might have been said that they too (like Heracles) were but men, named after the older Pan and Dionysus, the gods of antiquity; ,but as it is, the Greek story has it that no sooner was Dionysus born than Zeus sewed him up in his thigh and carried him away to Nysa in Ethiopia beyond Egypt ; and as for Pan, the Greeks do not know what became of him after his birth. It is therefore plain to me that the Greeks learned the names of these two gods later than the names of all the others, and trace the birth of both to the time when they gained the knowledge. 8.65. Dicaeus son of Theocydes, an Athenian exile who had become important among the Medes, said that at the time when the land of Attica was being laid waste by Xerxes' army and there were no Athenians in the country, he was with Demaratus the Lacedaemonian on the Thriasian plain and saw advancing from Eleusis a cloud of dust as if raised by the feet of about thirty thousand men. They marvelled at what men might be raising such a cloud of dust and immediately heard a cry. The cry seemed to be the “Iacchus” of the mysteries, ,and when Demaratus, ignorant of the rites of Eleusis, asked him what was making this sound, Dicaeus said, “Demaratus, there is no way that some great disaster will not befall the king's army. Since Attica is deserted, it is obvious that this voice is divine and comes from Eleusis to help the Athenians and their allies. ,If it descends upon the Peloponnese, the king himself and his army on the mainland will be endangered. If, however, it turns towards the ships at Salamis, the king will be in danger of losing his fleet. ,Every year the Athenians observe this festival for the Mother and the Maiden, and any Athenian or other Hellene who wishes is initiated. The voice which you hear is the ‘Iacchus’ they cry at this festival.” To this Demaratus replied, “Keep silent and tell this to no one else. ,If these words of yours are reported to the king, you will lose your head, and neither I nor any other man will be able to save you, so be silent. The gods will see to the army.” ,Thus he advised, and after the dust and the cry came a cloud, which rose aloft and floated away towards Salamis to the camp of the Hellenes. In this way they understood that Xerxes' fleet was going to be destroyed. Dicaeus son of Theocydes used to say this, appealing to Demaratus and others as witnesses.
19. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

649d. and excessive audacity, and fearful of ever daring to say or suffer or do anything shameful. Clin. So it appears. Ath. And are not these the conditions in which we are of the character described,—anger, lust, insolence, ignorance, covetousness, and extravagance; and these also,—wealth, beauty, strength, and everything which intoxicates a man with pleasure and turns his head? And for the purpose, first, of providing a cheap and comparatively harmless test of these conditions, and, secondly, of affording practice in them, what more suitable pleasure can we mention than wine
20. Sophocles, Antigone, 876, 1152 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

21. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 154, 211, 437, 827, 1096 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

22. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 1098 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1098. and that monstrous army of beasts with double form, hostile, going on hoofed feet, violent, lawless, of surpassing violence; you tamed the beast in Erymanthia, and underground the three-headed whelp of Hades, a resistless terror, offspring of the fierce Echidna; you tamed the dragon
23. Aristotle, Politics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

24. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 2.702 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2.702. καλὸν Ἰηπαιήονʼ Ἰηπαιήονα Φοῖβον
25. Eratosthenes, Catasterismi, 24 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

26. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 4.5.1-4.5.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.5.1.  Many epithets, so we are informed, have been given him by men, who have found the occasions from which they arose in the practices and customs which have become associated with him. So, for instance, he has been called Baccheius from Bacchic bands of women who accompanied him, Lenaeus from the custom of treading the clusters of grapes in a wine-tub (lenos), and Bromius from the thunder (bromos) which attended his birth; likewise for a similar reason he has been called Pyrigenes ("Born-of‑Fire"). 4.5.2.  Thriambus is a name that has been given him, they say, because he was the first of those of whom we have a record to have celebrated a triumph (thriambos) upon entering his native land after his campaign, this having been done when he returned from India with great booty. It is on a similar basis that the other appellations or epithets have been given to him, but we feel that it would be a long task to tell of them and inappropriate to the history which we are writing. He was thought to have two forms, men say, because there were two Dionysi, the ancient one having a long beard because all men in early times wore long beards, the younger one being youthful and effeminate and young, as we have mentioned before.
27. Hyginus, Fabulae (Genealogiae), 167 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

28. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 3.256-3.315, 4.15 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

29. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 3.4.2-3.4.3, 3.10.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.4.2. Κάδμος δὲ ἀνθʼ ὧν ἔκτεινεν ἀίδιον 3 -- ἐνιαυτὸν ἐθήτευσεν Ἄρει· ἦν δὲ ὁ ἐνιαυτὸς τότε ὀκτὼ ἔτη. μετὰ δὲ τὴν θητείαν Ἀθηνᾶ αὐτῷ τὴν βασιλείαν 4 -- κατεσκεύασε, Ζεὺς δὲ ἔδωκεν αὐτῷ γυναῖκα Ἁρμονίαν, Ἀφροδίτης καὶ Ἄρεος θυγατέρα. καὶ πάντες θεοὶ καταλιπόντες τὸν οὐρανόν, ἐν τῇ Καδμείᾳ τὸν γάμον εὐωχούμενοι καθύμνησαν. ἔδωκε δὲ αὐτῇ Κάδμος πέπλον καὶ τὸν ἡφαιστότευκτον ὅρμον, ὃν ὑπὸ Ἡφαίστου λέγουσί τινες δοθῆναι Κάδμῳ, Φερεκύδης δὲ ὑπὸ Εὐρώπης· ὃν παρὰ Διὸς αὐτὴν λαβεῖν. γίνονται δὲ Κάδμῳ θυγατέρες μὲν Αὐτονόη Ἰνὼ Σεμέλη Ἀγαυή, παῖς δὲ Πολύδωρος. Ἰνὼ μὲν οὖν Ἀθάμας ἔγημεν, Αὐτονόην δὲ Ἀρισταῖος, Ἀγαυὴν δὲ Ἐχίων. 3.4.3. Σεμέλης δὲ Ζεὺς ἐρασθεὶς Ἥρας κρύφα συνευνάζεται. ἡ δὲ ἐξαπατηθεῖσα ὑπὸ Ἥρας, κατανεύσαντος αὐτῇ Διὸς πᾶν τὸ αἰτηθὲν ποιήσειν, αἰτεῖται τοιοῦτον αὐτὸν ἐλθεῖν οἷος ἦλθε μνηστευόμενος Ἥραν. Ζεὺς δὲ μὴ δυνάμενος ἀνανεῦσαι παραγίνεται εἰς τὸν θάλαμον αὐτῆς ἐφʼ ἅρματος ἀστραπαῖς ὁμοῦ καὶ βρονταῖς, καὶ κεραυνὸν ἵησιν. Σεμέλης δὲ διὰ τὸν φόβον ἐκλιπούσης, ἑξαμηνιαῖον τὸ βρέφος ἐξαμβλωθὲν ἐκ τοῦ πυρὸς ἁρπάσας ἐνέρραψε τῷ μηρῷ. ἀποθανούσης δὲ Σεμέλης, αἱ λοιπαὶ Κάδμου θυγατέρες διήνεγκαν λόγον, συνηυνῆσθαι θνητῷ τινι Σεμέλην καὶ καταψεύσασθαι Διός, καὶ ὅτι 1 -- διὰ τοῦτο ἐκεραυνώθη. κατὰ δὲ τὸν χρόνον τὸν καθήκοντα Διόνυσον γεννᾷ Ζεὺς λύσας τὰ ῥάμματα, καὶ δίδωσιν Ἑρμῇ. ὁ δὲ κομίζει πρὸς Ἰνὼ καὶ Ἀθάμαντα καὶ πείθει τρέφειν ὡς κόρην. ἀγανακτήσασα δὲ Ἥρα μανίαν αὐτοῖς ἐνέβαλε, καὶ Ἀθάμας μὲν τὸν πρεσβύτερον παῖδα Λέαρχον ὡς ἔλαφον θηρεύσας ἀπέκτεινεν, Ἰνὼ δὲ τὸν Μελικέρτην εἰς πεπυρωμένον λέβητα ῥίψασα, εἶτα βαστάσασα μετὰ νεκροῦ τοῦ παιδὸς ἥλατο κατὰ βυθοῦ. 1 -- καὶ Λευκοθέα μὲν αὐτὴν καλεῖται, Παλαίμων δὲ ὁ παῖς, οὕτως ὀνομασθέντες ὑπὸ τῶν πλεόντων· τοῖς χειμαζομένοις γὰρ βοηθοῦσιν. ἐτέθη δὲ ἐπὶ Μελικέρτῃ ὁ 2 -- ἀγὼν τῶν Ἰσθμίων, Σισύφου θέντος. Διόνυσον δὲ Ζεὺς εἰς ἔριφον ἀλλάξας τὸν Ἥρας θυμὸν ἔκλεψε, καὶ λαβὼν αὐτὸν Ἑρμῆς πρὸς νύμφας ἐκόμισεν ἐν Νύσῃ κατοικούσας τῆς Ἀσίας, ἃς ὕστερον Ζεὺς καταστερίσας ὠνόμασεν Ὑάδας. 3.10.3. Ταϋγέτη δὲ ἐκ Διὸς ἐγέννησε 1 -- Λακεδαίμονα, ἀφʼ οὗ καὶ Λακεδαίμων ἡ χώρα καλεῖται. Λακεδαίμονος δὲ καὶ Σπάρτης τῆς Εὐρώτα, ὃς ἦν ἀπὸ Λέλεγος αὐτόχθονος καὶ νύμφης νηίδος Κλεοχαρείας, Ἀμύκλας καὶ Εὐρυδίκη, ἣν ἔγημεν Ἀκρίσιος. Ἀμύκλα δὲ καὶ Διομήδης τῆς Λαπίθου Κυνόρτης καὶ Ὑάκινθος. τοῦτον εἶναι τοῦ Ἀπόλλωνος ἐρώμενον λέγουσιν, ὃν δίσκῳ βαλὼν ἄκων ἀπέκτεινε. Κυνόρτου δὲ Περιήρης, ὃς γαμεῖ Γοργοφόνην τὴν Περσέως, καθάπερ Στησίχορός φησι, καὶ τίκτει Τυνδάρεων Ἰκάριον Ἀφαρέα Λεύκιππον. Ἀφαρέως μὲν οὖν καὶ Ἀρήνης τῆς Οἰβάλου 1 -- Λυγκεύς τε καὶ Ἴδας καὶ Πεῖσος· κατὰ πολλοὺς δὲ Ἴδας ἐκ Ποσειδῶνος λέγεται. Λυγκεὺς δὲ ὀξυδερκίᾳ διήνεγκεν, ὡς καὶ τὰ ὑπὸ γῆν θεωρεῖν. Λευκίππου δὲ θυγατέρες ἐγένοντο Ἱλάειρα καὶ Φοίβη· ταύτας ἁρπάσαντες ἔγημαν Διόσκουροι. πρὸς δὲ ταύταις Ἀρσινόην ἐγέννησε. ταύτῃ μίγνυται Ἀπόλλων, ἡ δὲ Ἀσκληπιὸν γεννᾷ. τινὲς δὲ Ἀσκληπιὸν οὐκ ἐξ Ἀρσινόης τῆς Λευκίππου λέγουσιν, ἀλλʼ ἐκ Κορωνίδος τῆς Φλεγύου ἐν Θεσσαλίᾳ. καί φασιν ἐρασθῆναι ταύτης Ἀπόλλωνα καὶ εὐθέως συνελθεῖν· τὴν δὲ 1 -- παρὰ τὴν τοῦ πατρὸς γνώμην ἑλομένην 2 -- Ἴσχυϊ τῷ Καινέως ἀδελφῷ συνοικεῖν. Ἀπόλλων δὲ τὸν μὲν ἀπαγγείλαντα κόρακα καταρᾶται, ὃν 3 -- τέως λευκὸν ὄντα ἐποίησε μέλανα, αὐτὴν δὲ ἀπέκτεινε. καιομένης δὲ αὐτῆς 4 -- ἁρπάσας τὸ βρέφος ἐκ τῆς πυρᾶς πρὸς Χείρωνα τὸν Κένταυρον ἤνεγκε, παρʼ ᾧ 1 -- καὶ τὴν ἰατρικὴν καὶ τὴν κυνηγετικὴν τρεφόμενος ἐδιδάχθη. καὶ γενόμενος χειρουργικὸς καὶ τὴν τέχνην ἀσκήσας ἐπὶ πολὺ οὐ μόνον ἐκώλυέ τινας ἀποθνήσκειν, ἀλλʼ ἀνήγειρε καὶ τοὺς ἀποθανόντας· παρὰ γὰρ Ἀθηνᾶς λαβὼν τὸ ἐκ τῶν φλεβῶν τῆς Γοργόνος ῥυὲν αἷμα, τῷ μὲν ἐκ τῶν ἀριστερῶν ῥυέντι πρὸς φθορὰν ἀνθρώπων ἐχρῆτο, τῷ δὲ ἐκ τῶν δεξιῶν πρὸς σωτηρίαν, καὶ διὰ τούτου 2 -- τοὺς τεθνηκότας ἀνήγειρεν. εὗρον 3 -- δέ τινας λεγομένους ἀναστῆναι ὑπʼ αὐτοῦ, Καπανέα καὶ Λυκοῦργον, ὡς Στησίχορός φησιν ἐν Ἐριφύλῃ, Ἱππόλυτον, ὡς ὁ τὰ Ναυπακτικὰ συγγράψας λέγει, Τυνδάρεων, ὥς φησι Πανύασις, 1 -- Ὑμέναιον, ὡς οἱ Ὀρφικοὶ λέγουσι, Γλαῦκον τὸν Μίνωος, ὡς Μελησαγόρας λέγε ι.
30. Arrian, Anabasis of Alexander, 6.28.2 (1st cent. CE

6.28.2. ὅτι καὶ ὑπὲρ ἐκείνου λόγος ἐλέγετο καταστρεψάμενον Ἰνδοὺς Διόνυσον οὕτω τὴν πολλὴν τῆς Ἀσίας ἐπελθεῖν, καὶ Θρίαμβόν τε αὐτὸν ἐπικληθῆναι τὸν Διόνυσον καὶ τὰς ἐπὶ ταῖς νίκαις ταῖς ἐκ πολέμου πομπὰς ἐπὶ τῷ αὐτῷ τούτῳ θριάμβους. ταῦτα δὲ οὔτε Πτολεμαῖος ὁ Λάγου οὔτε Ἀριστόβουλος ὁ Ἀριστοβούλου ἀνέγραψαν οὐδέ τις ἄλλος ὅντινα ἱκανὸν ἄν τις ποιήσαιτο τεκμηριῶσαι ὑπὲρ τῶν τοιῶνδε, καί μοι ὡς οὐ πιστὰ ἀναγεγράφθαι Aristob. fr. 36 ἐξήρκεσαν.
31. Cornutus, De Natura Deorum, 30 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

32. New Testament, Luke, 1.34 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.34. Mary said to the angel, "How can this be, seeing I am a virgin?
33. New Testament, Matthew, 1.25 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.25. and didn't know her sexually until she had brought forth her firstborn son. He named him Jesus.
34. Plutarch, Themistocles, 13.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

35. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 41.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

36. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.40.6, 2.2.6, 2.26.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.40.6. After the precinct of Zeus, when you have ascended the citadel, which even at the present day is called Caria from Car, son of Phoroneus, you see a temple of Dionysus Nyctelius (Nocturnal), a sanctuary built to Aphrodite Epistrophia (She who turns men to love), an oracle called that of Night and a temple of Zeus Conius (Dusty) without a roof. The image of Asclepius and also that of Health were made by Bryaxis. Here too is what is called the Chamber of Demeter, built, they say, by Car when he was king. 2.2.6. The things worthy of mention in the city include the extant remains of antiquity, but the greater number of them belong to the period of its second ascendancy. On the market-place, where most of the sanctuaries are, stand Artemis surnamed Ephesian and wooden images of Dionysus, which are covered with gold with the exception of their faces; these are ornamented with red paint. They are called Lysius and Baccheus 2.26.7. The third account is, in my opinion, the farthest from the truth; it makes Asclepius to be the son of Arsinoe, the daughter of Leucippus. For when Apollophanes the Arcadian, came to Delphi and asked the god if Asclepius was the son of Arsinoe and therefore a Messenian, the Pythian priestess gave this response:— 0 Asclepius, born to bestow great joy upon mortals, Pledge of the mutual love I enjoyed with Phlegyas' daughter, Lovely Coronis, who bare thee in rugged land Epidaurus . Unknown . This oracle makes it quite certain that Asclepius was not a son of Arsinoe, and that the story was a fiction invented by Hesiod, or by one of Hesiod's interpolators, just to please the Messenians.
37. Firmicus Maternus Julius., De Errore Profanarum Religionum, 6.5 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

38. Papyri, Papyri Graecae Magicae, 3.494-3.611, 8.1-8.63, 13.734-13.1077 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

39. Porphyry, On Abstinence, 2.55 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

2.55. 55.This sacred institute was, however, abolished by Diphilus, the king of Cyprus, who flourished about the time of Seleucus, the theologist. But Daemon substituted an ox for a man; thus causing the latter sacrifice to be of equal worth with the former. Amosis also abolished the law of sacrificing men in the Egyptian city Heliopolis; the truth of which is testified by Manetho in his treatise on Antiquity and Piety. But the sacrifice was made to Juno, and an investigation took place, as if they were endeavouring to find pure calves, and such as were marked by the impression of a seal. Three men also were sacrificed on the day appointed for this purpose, in the place of whom Amosis ordered them to substitute three waxen images. In Chios likewise, they sacrificed a man to Omadius Bacchus 23, the man being for this purpose torn in pieces; and the same custom, as Eulpis Carystius says, was adopted in |77 Tenedos. To which may be added, that the Lacedaemonians, as Apollodorus says, sacrificed a man to Mars. SPAN
40. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 327, 325

41. Orphic Hymns., Hymni, 52.1



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
apollo, apollonian, apolline Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47, 84
asclepius de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
attica, attic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350
bacchae Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 378, 381
bacchus, bacchius Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350, 351, 357
bacchus, βάκχος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 351
billings, j. xviii Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 378, 381
cerberus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 316
chaldaean oracles Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 28
characters Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 378
chios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
chiron de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
chorus (male, female), in aeschylus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
chorus (male, female), of a. bassarae or bassarides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47, 84, 316, 351, 357
chthonic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 316
cry, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47, 84, 350
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47, 84, 338
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
cyclops Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 316
dance, dancing Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47, 338
delphi, delphian, delphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47, 84
dionyso(u)s Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 378, 381
dionysos, awakening Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 316, 338, 351, 357
dionysos, dionysos bacchios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos bacchos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 351
dionysos, dionysos bromios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47, 350, 351, 357
dionysos, dionysos choragos/choreutas/philochoreutas Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos dithyrambos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47, 84, 338, 350, 357
dionysos, dionysos eriboas Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos eribremetas Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos eribromos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos euios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos liberator Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos liknites Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos lyaios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos lyseus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos lysios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos nyktelios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos omadios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos omestes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos thriambos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos xenos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 316
dionysos, epiphany Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 338, 357
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47, 84, 316, 338, 350, 351, 357
dionysus, birth de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
dionysus, heart de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
dionysus Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 28
dirce Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 84
dithyramb Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 84, 351
donysos manikos, mainoles, mainolios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dragon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 316
dramatic technique Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
earth, earthly Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 316
earth de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
echion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 316
eleusis, eleusinian, mysteries Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350
eleusis, eleusinian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350
euripides, bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
evidence (of aeschylus dionysiac tetralogies), mythographic Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
evohé εὐαί, εὐαἵ, εὐοἷ Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
festival, festivity, festive Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
fire Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 351; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
flute Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350, 351
helios Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 28
hera de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
hermes Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 28
hubris Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
iacche ἴακχε Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350
iacchos ἴακχος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47, 350
initiate Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 338
initiates de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
knowledge Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 28
liberation Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
life de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
lightning de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
liknon λίκνον Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
lycurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
lydia, lydian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 357
madness Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350, 357
male Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 316, 338
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 316, 338, 350, 351, 357
mantinea Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
musaeus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
mysteries, mystery cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 338
mystes μύστης Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 351
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 316
myth de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
nag hammadi library Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 28
name Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 28
night, nocturnal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
nurse de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
nyktelia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
nymph Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 84; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
nysa, nyseion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 84
nysa de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
odysseus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 316
olympus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
omophagia ὠμοφαγία Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
oracle Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 28
orpheus, literary author de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
orpheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
orphic, see titans, zagreus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
paean παιάν Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 84
parnassus, parnassian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
parodos Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
peisistratus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350
pentheus, death Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 357
pentheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 316, 338, 357; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
performance Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 84, 350
poetry de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
polis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 316, 357
procession Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
reconstruction, of bassarae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, aegyptii Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, agamemnon Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, amymone Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, bassarae/bassarides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, choephoroi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, danaides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, eumenides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, laius Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, oedipus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, proteus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, seven Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, sphinx Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, supplices Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47, 84, 338, 350, 351
semele Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 84, 338, 351; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
skin, animal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
sparagmos/dismemberment Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
speech de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
sphinx Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 316
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 84, 316, 338, 350
theomachist, theomachus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 316
theomachos (–oi)/theomachia/theomachein Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
thiasos θίασος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 351
thriambos θρίαμβος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
thunder, thunderbolt Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 351
thyrsus θύρσος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
tragedy, tragic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 84, 357
wine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350, 357
womb Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 28; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
worship Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47, 350
zeus' Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 28
zeus, zeus lightning de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
zeus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 84, 316, 338, 351, 357; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 378; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128