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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5614
Euripides, Bacchae, 51-52


ὀργῇ σὺν ὅπλοις ἐξ ὄρους βάκχας ἄγεινrevealing myself. But if ever the city of Thebes should in anger seek to drive the the Bacchae down from the mountains with arms, I, the general of the Maenads, will join battle with them. On which account I have changed my form to a mortal one and altered my shape into the nature of a man.


ζητῇ, ξυνάψω μαινάσι στρατηλατῶν.revealing myself. But if ever the city of Thebes should in anger seek to drive the the Bacchae down from the mountains with arms, I, the general of the Maenads, will join battle with them. On which account I have changed my form to a mortal one and altered my shape into the nature of a man.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

36 results
1. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 221-223, 225, 214 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

214. q rend= 214. q type=
2. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 25-26, 24 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

24. Βρόμιος ἔχει τὸν χῶρον, οὐδʼ ἀμνημονῶ
3. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 498, 497 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

497. αὐτὸς δʼ ἐπηλάλαξεν, ἔνθεος δʼ Ἄρει
4. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 1313 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1313. θυρσαδδωᾶν καὶ παιδδωᾶν.
5. Aristophanes, Clouds, 605 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

605. Βάκχαις Δελφίσιν ἐμπρέπων
6. Euripides, Bacchae, 10, 100-101, 1018-1023, 1029, 1089, 1093, 11, 1124, 1131, 1145, 1153, 1160, 1168, 1189, 12, 120-122, 1224, 123-129, 13, 130-138, 1387, 139, 14, 140-149, 15, 150-159, 16, 160-169, 17-19, 195, 2, 20-22, 225, 23, 233-238, 24-25, 259, 26-28, 288-289, 29, 3, 30-36, 366, 37-39, 4, 40-41, 415, 42-44, 443, 449, 45, 450, 46-49, 491, 499, 5, 50, 52, 529, 53, 530, 54-55, 550-559, 56, 560-569, 57, 570-575, 578, 58-59, 6, 60, 605, 61-62, 623, 63, 632, 64-66, 664, 67-69, 690, 7, 70-73, 735, 74-75, 759, 76, 762-764, 769, 77, 770, 778-779, 78, 780-785, 79, 791, 799, 8, 80-81, 810-812, 815, 82-83, 837, 84, 842, 847, 85-89, 9, 90-91, 915, 92-94, 940, 942, 946, 95-98, 987, 99, 998, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. ἥκω Διὸς παῖς τήνδε Θηβαίων χθόνα 1. I, the son of Zeus, have come to this land of the Thebans—Dionysus, whom once Semele, Kadmos’ daughter, bore, delivered by a lightning-bearing flame. And having taken a mortal form instead of a god’s
7. Euripides, Cyclops, 156, 38, 446, 64, 709, 72, 143 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

143. ὁ Βακχίου παῖς, ὡς σαφέστερον μάθῃς. 143. The son of the Bacchic god, that thou mayst learn more certainly. Silenu
8. Euripides, Hecuba, 121, 1076 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1076. ποῖ πᾷ φέρομαι τέκν' ἔρημα λιπὼν
9. Euripides, Helen, 543 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

543. οὐχ ὡς δρομαία πῶλος ἢ Βάκχη θεοῦ
10. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1119 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1119. I will explain, if you are no longer mad as a fiend of hell. Heracle
11. Euripides, Hippolytus, 560, 551 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Ion, 552-553, 716-717, 550 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

550. Didst thou in days gone by come to the Pythian rock? Xuthu
13. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 953, 164 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1489 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Euripides, Rhesus, 972 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

972. As under far Pangaion Orpheus lies
16. Herodotus, Histories, 4.79 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4.79. But when things had to turn out badly for him, they did so for this reason: he conceived a desire to be initiated into the rites of the Bacchic Dionysus; and when he was about to begin the sacred mysteries, he saw the greatest vision. ,He had in the city of the Borysthenites a spacious house, grand and costly (the same house I just mentioned), all surrounded by sphinxes and griffins worked in white marble; this house was struck by a thunderbolt. And though the house burnt to the ground, Scyles none the less performed the rite to the end. ,Now the Scythians reproach the Greeks for this Bacchic revelling, saying that it is not reasonable to set up a god who leads men to madness. ,So when Scyles had been initiated into the Bacchic rite, some one of the Borysthenites scoffed at the Scythians: “You laugh at us, Scythians, because we play the Bacchant and the god possesses us; but now this deity has possessed your own king, so that he plays the Bacchant and is maddened by the god. If you will not believe me, follow me now and I will show him to you.” ,The leading men among the Scythians followed him, and the Borysthenite brought them up secretly onto a tower; from which, when Scyles passed by with his company of worshippers, they saw him playing the Bacchant; thinking it a great misfortune, they left the city and told the whole army what they had seen.
17. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

69c. from all these things, and self-restraint and justice and courage and wisdom itself are a kind of purification. And I fancy that those men who established the mysteries were not unenlightened, but in reality had a hidden meaning when they said long ago that whoever goes uninitiated and unsanctified to the other world will lie in the mire, but he who arrives there initiated and purified will dwell with the gods. For as they say in the mysteries, the thyrsus-bearers are many, but the mystics few ;
18. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

253a. they seek after information themselves, and when they search eagerly within themselves to find the nature of their god, they are successful, because they have been compelled to keep their eyes fixed upon the god, and as they reach and grasp him by memory they are inspired and receive from him character and habits, so far as it is possible for a man to have part in God. Now they consider the beloved the cause of all this, so they love him more than before, and if they draw the waters of their inspiration from Zeus, like the bacchantes, they pour it out upon the beloved and make him, so far as possible, like their god.
19. Plato, Symposium, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

218b. a Pausanias, an Aristodemus, and an Aristophanes—I need not mention Socrates himself—and all the rest of them; every one of you has had his share of philosophic frenzy and transport, so all of you shall hear. You shall stand up alike for what then was done and for what now is spoken. But the domestics, and all else profane and clownish, must clap the heaviest of doors upon their ears.
20. Sophocles, Antigone, 135-136, 154, 963-964, 1122 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

21. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 210-215, 209 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

22. Demosthenes, Orations, 21.52 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

23. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 3.58-3.59, 5.49 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.58. 1.  However, an account is handed down also that this goddess was born in Phrygia. For the natives of that country have the following myth: In ancient times Meïon became king of Phrygia and Lydia; and marrying Dindymê he begat an infant daughter, but being unwilling to rear her he exposed her on the mountain which was called Cybelus. There, in accordance with some divine providence, both the leopards and some of the other especially ferocious wild beasts offered their nipples to the child and so gave it nourishment,,2.  and some women who were tending the flocks in that place witnessed the happening, and being astonished at the strange event took up the babe and called her Cybelê after the name of the place. The child, as she grew up, excelled in both beauty and virtue and also came to be admired for her intelligence; for she was the first to devise the pipe of many reeds and to invent cymbals and kettledrums with which to accompany the games and the dance, and in addition she taught how to heal the sicknesses of both flocks and little children by means of rites of purification;,3.  in consequence, since the babes were saved from death by her spells and were generally taken up in her arms, her devotion to them and affection for them led all the people to speak of her as the "mother of the mountain." The man who associated with her and loved her more than anyone else, they say, was Marsyas the physician, who was admired for his intelligence and chastity; and a proof of his intelligence they find in the fact that he imitated the sounds made by the pipe of many reeds and carried all its notes over into the flute, and as an indication of his chastity they cite his abstinence from sexual pleasures until the day of his death.,4.  Now Cybelê, the myth records, having arrived at full womanhood, came to love a certain native youth who was known as Attis, but at a later time received the appellation Papas; with him she consorted secretly and became with child, and at about the same time her parents recognized her as their child.  Consequently she was brought up into the palace, and her father welcomed her at the outset under the impression that she was a virgin, but later, when he learned of her seduction, he put to death her nurses and Attis as well and cast their bodies forth to lie unburied; whereupon Cybelê, they say, because of her love for the youth and grief over the nurses, became frenzied and rushed out of the palace into the countryside. And crying aloud and beating upon a kettledrum she visited every country alone, with hair hanging free, and Marsyas, out of pity for her plight, voluntarily followed her and accompanied her in her wanderings because of the love which he had formerly borne her. 3.59. 2.  When they came to Dionysus in the city of Nysa they found there Apollo, who was being accorded high favour because of the lyre, which, they say, Hermes invented, though Apollo was the first to play it fittingly; and when Marsyas strove with Apollo in a contest of skill and the Nysaeans had been appointed judges, the first time Apollo played upon the lyre without accompanying it with his voice, while Marsyas, striking up upon his pipes, amazed the ears of his hearers by their strange music and in their opinion far excelled, by reason of his melody, the first contestant.,3.  But since they had agreed to take turn about in displaying their skill to the judges, Apollo, they say, added, this second time, his voice in harmony with the music of the lyre, whereby he gained greater approval than that which had formerly been accorded to the pipes. Marsyas, however, was enraged and tried to prove to the hearers that he was losing the contest in defiance of every principle of justice; for, he argued, it should be a comparison of skill and not of voice, and only by such a test was it possible to judge between the harmony and music of the lyre and of the pipes; and furthermore, it was unjust that two skills should be compared in combination against but one. Apollo, however, as the myth relates, replied that he was in no sense taking any unfair advantage of the other;,4.  in fact, when Marsyas blew into his pipes he was doing almost the same thing as himself; consequently the rule should be made either that they should both be accorded this equal privilege of combining their skills, or that neither of them should use his mouth in the contest but should display his special skill by the use only of his hands.,5.  When the hearers decided that Apollo presented the more just argument, their skills were again compared; Marsyas was defeated, and Apollo, who had become somewhat embittered by the quarrel, flayed the defeated man alive. But quickly repenting and being distressed at what he had done, he broke the strings of the lyre and destroyed the harmony of sounds which he had discovered.,6.  The harmony of the strings, however, was rediscovered, when the Muses added later the middle string, Linus the string struck with the forefinger, and Orpheus and Thamyras the lowest string and the one next to it. And Apollo, they say, laid away both the lyre and the pipes as a votive offering in the cave of Dionysus, and becoming enamoured of Cybelê joined in her wanderings as far as the land of the Hyperboreans.,7.  But, the myth goes on to say, a pestilence fell upon human beings throughout Phrygia and the land ceased to bear fruit, and when the unfortunate people inquired of the god how they might rid themselves of their ills he commanded them, it is said, to bury the body of Attis and to honour Cybelê as a goddess. Consequently the physicians, since the body had disappeared in the course of time, made an image of the youth, before which they sang dirges and by means of honours in keeping with his suffering propitiated the wrath of him who had been wronged; and these rites they continue to perform down to our own lifetime.,8.  As for Cybelê, in ancient times they erected altars and performed sacrifices to her yearly; and later they built for her a costly temple in Pisinus of Phrygia, and established honours and sacrifices of the greatest magnificence, Midas their king taking part in all these works out of his devotion to beauty; and beside the statue of the goddess they set up panthers and lions, since it was the common opinion that she had first been nursed by these animals. Such, then, are the myths which are told about Mother of the Gods both among the Phrygians and by the Atlantians who dwell on the coast of the ocean. 5.49. 1.  This wedding of Cadmus and Harmonia was the first, we are told, for which the gods provided the marriage-feast, and Demeter, becoming enamoured of Iasion, presented him with the fruit of the corn, Hermes gave a lyre, Athena the renowned necklace and a robe and a flute, and Electra the sacred rites of the Great Mother of the Gods, as she is called, together with cymbals and kettledrums and the instruments of her ritual; and Apollo played upon the lyre and the Muses upon their flutes, and the rest of the gods spoke them fair and gave the pair their aid in the celebration of the wedding.,2.  After this Cadmus, they say, in accordance with the oracle he had received, founded Thebes in Boeotia, while Iasion married Cybelê and begat Corybas. And after Iasion had been removed into the circle of the gods, Dardanus and Cybelê and Corybas conveyed to Asia the sacred rites of the Mother of the Gods and removed with them to Phrygia.,3.  Thereupon Cybelê, joining herself to the first Olympus, begat Alcê and called the goddess Cybelê after herself; and Corybas gave the name of Corybantes to all who, in celebrating the rites of his mother, acted like men possessed, and married Thebê, the daughter of Cilix.,4.  In like manner he also transferred the flute from Samothrace to Phrygia and to Lyrnessus the lyre which Hermes gave and which at a later time Achilles took for himself when he sacked that city. To Iasion and Demeter, according to the story the myths relate, was born Plutus or Wealth, but the reference is, as a matter of fact, to the wealth of the corn, which was presented to Iasion because of Demeter's association with him at the time of the wedding of Harmonia.,5.  Now the details of the initiatory rite are guarded among the matters not to be divulged and are communicated to the initiates alone; but the fame has travelled wide of how these gods appear to mankind and bring unexpected aid to those initiates of theirs who call upon them in the midst of perils.,6.  The claim is also made that men who have taken part in the mysteries become both more pious and more just and better in every respect than they were before. And this is the reason, we are told, why the most famous both of the ancient heroes and of the demi-gods were eagerly desirous of taking part in the initiatory rite; and in fact Jason and the Dioscori, and Heracles and Orpheus as well, after their initiation attained success in all the campaigns they undertook, because these gods appeared to them.
24. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 4.181, 4.389-4.415, 11.1-11.5, 11.50-11.51 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

25. Philo of Alexandria, On Planting, 148 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

26. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.667, 7.385-7.400, 9.477 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.667. to bring him back to Iove, or set me free. 7.385. But nay! Though flung forth from their native land 7.386. I o'er the waves, with enmity unstayed 7.387. dared give them chase, and on that exiled few 7.388. hurled the whole sea. I smote the sons of Troy 7.389. with ocean's power and heaven's. But what availed 7.390. Syrtes, or Scylla, or Charybdis' waves? 7.391. The Trojans are in Tiber ; and abide 7.392. within their prayed-for land delectable 7.393. afe from the seas and me! Mars once had power 7.394. the monstrous Lapithae to slay; and Jove 7.395. to Dian's honor and revenge gave o'er 7.396. the land of Calydon. What crime so foul 7.397. was wrought by Lapithae or Calydon? 7.398. But I, Jove's wife and Queen, who in my woes 7.399. have ventured each bold stroke my power could find 7.400. and every shift essayed,—behold me now 9.477. urprising all save Rhoetus, who awake
27. Vergil, Eclogues, 5.27-5.28 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.27. “For Daphnis cruelly slain wept all the Nymphs— 5.28. ye hazels, bear them witness, and ye streams—
28. Vergil, Georgics, 4.460-4.463 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.460. “Bring, bring him to our sight,” the mother cried; 4.461. “His feet may tread the threshold even of Gods.” 4.462. So saying, she bids the flood yawn wide and yield 4.463. A pathway for his footsteps; but the wave
29. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 3.5.1-3.5.2, 3.12.1, 3.12.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.5.1. Διόνυσος δὲ εὑρετὴς ἀμπέλου γενόμενος, Ἥρας μανίαν αὐτῷ ἐμβαλούσης περιπλανᾶται Αἴγυπτόν τε καὶ Συρίαν. καὶ τὸ μὲν πρῶτον Πρωτεὺς αὐτὸν ὑποδέχεται βασιλεὺς Αἰγυπτίων, αὖθις δὲ εἰς Κύβελα τῆς Φρυγίας ἀφικνεῖται, κἀκεῖ καθαρθεὶς ὑπὸ Ῥέας καὶ τὰς τελετὰς ἐκμαθών, καὶ λαβὼν παρʼ ἐκείνης τὴν στολήν, ἐπὶ Ἰνδοὺς 1 -- διὰ τῆς Θράκης ἠπείγετο. Λυκοῦργος δὲ παῖς Δρύαντος, Ἠδωνῶν βασιλεύων, οἳ Στρυμόνα ποταμὸν παροικοῦσι, πρῶτος ὑβρίσας ἐξέβαλεν αὐτόν. καὶ Διόνυσος μὲν εἰς θάλασσαν πρὸς Θέτιν τὴν Νηρέως κατέφυγε, Βάκχαι δὲ ἐγένοντο αἰχμάλωτοι καὶ τὸ συνεπόμενον Σατύρων πλῆθος αὐτῷ. αὖθις δὲ αἱ Βάκχαι ἐλύθησαν ἐξαίφνης, Λυκούργῳ δὲ μανίαν ἐνεποίησε 2 -- Διόνυσος. ὁ δὲ μεμηνὼς Δρύαντα τὸν παῖδα, ἀμπέλου νομίζων κλῆμα κόπτειν, πελέκει πλήξας ἀπέκτεινε, καὶ ἀκρωτηριάσας αὐτὸν ἐσωφρόνησε. 1 -- τῆς δὲ γῆς ἀκάρπου μενούσης, ἔχρησεν ὁ θεὸς καρποφορήσειν αὐτήν, ἂν θανατωθῇ Λυκοῦργος. Ἠδωνοὶ δὲ ἀκούσαντες εἰς τὸ Παγγαῖον αὐτὸν ἀπαγαγόντες ὄρος ἔδησαν, κἀκεῖ κατὰ Διονύσου βούλησιν ὑπὸ ἵππων διαφθαρεὶς ἀπέθανε. 3.5.2. διελθὼν δὲ Θρᾴκην καὶ τὴν Ἰνδικὴν ἅπασαν, στήλας ἐκεῖ στήσας 1 -- ἧκεν εἰς Θήβας, καὶ τὰς γυναῖκας ἠνάγκασε καταλιπούσας τὰς οἰκίας βακχεύειν ἐν τῷ Κιθαιρῶνι. Πενθεὺς δὲ γεννηθεὶς ἐξ Ἀγαυῆς Ἐχίονι, παρὰ Κάδμου εἰληφὼς τὴν βασιλείαν, διεκώλυε ταῦτα γίνεσθαι, καὶ παραγενόμενος εἰς Κιθαιρῶνα τῶν Βακχῶν κατάσκοπος ὑπὸ τῆς μητρὸς Ἀγαυῆς κατὰ μανίαν ἐμελίσθη· ἐνόμισε γὰρ αὐτὸν θηρίον εἶναι. δείξας δὲ Θηβαίοις ὅτι θεός ἐστιν, ἧκεν εἰς Ἄργος, κἀκεῖ 2 -- πάλιν οὐ τιμώντων αὐτὸν ἐξέμηνε τὰς γυναῖκας. αἱ δὲ ἐν τοῖς ὄρεσι τοὺς ἐπιμαστιδίους ἔχουσαι 3 -- παῖδας τὰς σάρκας αὐτῶν ἐσιτοῦντο. 3.12.1. Ἠλέκτρας δὲ τῆς Ἄτλαντος καὶ Διὸς Ἰασίων καὶ Δάρδανος ἐγένοντο. Ἰασίων μὲν οὖν ἐρασθεὶς Δήμητρος καὶ θέλων καταισχῦναι τὴν θεὸν κεραυνοῦται, Δάρδανος δὲ ἐπὶ τῷ θανάτῳ τοῦ ἀδελφοῦ λυπούμενος, Σαμοθρᾴκην ἀπολιπὼν εἰς τὴν ἀντίπερα ἤπειρον ἦλθε. ταύτης δὲ ἐβασίλευε Τεῦκρος ποταμοῦ Σκαμάνδρου καὶ νύμφης Ἰδαίας· ἀφʼ οὗ καὶ οἱ τὴν χώραν νεμόμενοι Τεῦκροι προσηγορεύοντο. ὑποδεχθεὶς δὲ ὑπὸ τοῦ βασιλέως, καὶ λαβὼν μέρος τῆς γῆς καὶ τὴν ἐκείνου θυγατέρα Βάτειαν, Δάρδανον ἔκτισε πόλιν· τελευτήσαντος δὲ Τεύκρου 1 -- τὴν χώραν ἅπασαν Δαρδανίαν ἐκάλεσε. 3.12.3. Ἶλος δὲ εἰς Φρυγίαν ἀφικόμενος καὶ καταλαβὼν ὑπὸ τοῦ βασιλέως αὐτόθι τεθειμένον ἀγῶνα νικᾷ πάλην· καὶ λαβὼν ἆθλον πεντήκοντα κόρους 2 -- καὶ κόρας τὰς ἴσας, δόντος αὐτῷ τοῦ βασιλέως κατὰ χρησμὸν καὶ βοῦν ποικίλην, καὶ φράσαντος ἐν ᾧπερ ἂν αὐτὴ κλιθῇ τόπῳ πόλιν κτίζειν, εἵπετο τῇ βοΐ. ἡ δὲ ἀφικομένη ἐπὶ τὸν λεγόμενον τῆς Φρυγίας Ἄτης λόφον κλίνεται· ἔνθα πόλιν κτίσας Ἶλος ταύτην μὲν Ἴλιον ἐκάλεσε, τῷ δὲ Διὶ σημεῖον εὐξάμενος αὐτῷ τι φανῆναι, μεθʼ ἡμέραν τὸ διιπετὲς παλλάδιον πρὸ τῆς σκηνῆς κείμενον ἐθεάσατο. ἦν δὲ τῷ μεγέθει τρίπηχυ, τοῖς δὲ ποσὶ συμβεβηκός, καὶ τῇ μὲν δεξιᾷ δόρυ διηρμένον 1 -- ἔχον τῇ δὲ ἑτέρᾳ ἠλακάτην καὶ ἄτρακτον. ἱστορία δὲ 1 -- ἡ περὶ τοῦ παλλαδίου τοιάδε φέρεται· φασὶ γεννηθεῖσαν τὴν Ἀθηνᾶν παρὰ Τρίτωνι τρέφεσθαι, ᾧ θυγάτηρ ἦν Παλλάς· ἀμφοτέρας δὲ ἀσκούσας τὰ κατὰ πόλεμον εἰς φιλονεικίαν ποτὲ προελθεῖν. μελλούσης δὲ πλήττειν τῆς Παλλάδος τὸν Δία φοβηθέντα τὴν αἰγίδα προτεῖναι, 2 -- τὴν δὲ εὐλαβηθεῖσαν ἀναβλέψαι, καὶ οὕτως ὑπὸ τῆς Ἀθηνᾶς τρωθεῖσαν πεσεῖν. Ἀθηνᾶν δὲ περίλυπον ἐπʼ αὐτῇ γενομένην, ξόανον ἐκείνης ὅμοιον κατασκευάσαι, 3 -- καὶ περιθεῖναι τοῖς στέρνοις ἣν ἔδεισεν αἰγίδα, καὶ τιμᾶν ἱδρυσαμένην παρὰ τῷ Διί. ὕστερον δὲ Ἠλέκτρας κατὰ 4 -- τὴν φθορὰν τούτῳ προσφυγούσης, Δία ῥῖψαι 5 -- μετʼ Ἄτης καὶ 1 -- τὸ παλλάδιον εἰς τὴν Ἰλιάδα χώραν, Ἶλον δὲ τούτῳ 2 -- ναὸν κατασκευάσαντα τιμᾶν. καὶ περὶ μὲν τοῦ παλλαδίου ταῦτα λέγεται. Ἶλος δὲ γήμας Εὐρυδίκην τὴν Ἀδράστου Λαομέδοντα ἐγέννησεν, ὃς γαμεῖ Στρυμὼ τὴν Σκαμάνδρου, κατὰ δέ τινας Πλακίαν τὴν Ὀτρέως, 3 -- κατʼ ἐνίους δὲ Λευκίππην, 4 -- καὶ τεκνοῖ παῖδας μὲν Τιθωνὸν Λάμπον 5 -- Κλυτίον Ἱκετάονα Ποδάρκην, θυγατέρας δὲ Ἡσιόνην καὶ Κίλλαν καὶ Ἀστυόχην, ἐκ δὲ νύμφης Καλύβης Βουκολίωνα.
30. Plutarch, Julius Caesar, 9.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

31. Plutarch, Table Talk, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

32. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 2.242, 2.250-2.251, 2.264, 2.280, 2.283 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

33. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 2.12 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

34. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.29.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.29.2. Outside the city, too, in the parishes and on the roads, the Athenians have sanctuaries of the gods, and graves of heroes and of men. The nearest is the Academy, once the property of a private individual, but in my time a gymnasium. As you go down to it you come to a precinct of Artemis, and wooden images of Ariste (Best) and Calliste (Fairest). In my opinion, which is supported by the poems of Pamphos, these are surnames of Artemis. There is another account of them, which I know but shall omit. Then there is a small temple, into which every year on fixed days they carry the image of Dionysus Eleuthereus.
35. Pollux, Onomasticon, 4.53, 4.55 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

36. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 474.15-474.16



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adaptation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 164
adonis Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 239
amata Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 249
aphrodite Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 330
apollo, apollonian, apolline Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
apollo Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 239
argos, argive Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
athens and athenians, and drama Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
aulos Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
bacchae Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 384
bacchants, bacchae, bacchai Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 49, 330
bacchants, maenads Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 112
baccheia βακχεία Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
bacchic Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 384
bacchic rites, in vergils aeneid Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 249
bacchic rites, military imagery and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 239, 249
bacchus, bacchius Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
bacchus, βάκχος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 49
bacchus/dionysus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 239
berezan Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
billings, j. xviii Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 384
bona dea Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
burials and mourning, poet, traditional lament for death of Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 239
cadmus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 49
ciconian women, lemnian women compared Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 249
cithaeron Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 74, 122
classical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
comedy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
context/environment/milieu, socio-cultural, ideological Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 142
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 330
cult-establishment/foundation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 142, 164
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122, 142, 164
daimon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 312
dance, dancing Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
delirium Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
dido Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 249
dindymene Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
dionyso(u)s Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 384
dionysos, arrival Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 312
dionysos, dionysos baccheios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
dionysos, dionysos baccheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
dionysos, dionysos bacchios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 49
dionysos, dionysos bacchos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 49
dionysos, dionysos bromios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
dionysos, dionysos mainomenos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
dionysos, dionysos xenos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 312
dionysos, epiphany Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49, 312, 330
dionysos, gift Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
dionysos, prodigies Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 330
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 49, 312, 330
dionysus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
divine status Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 112
ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 330
elegy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
entheos ἔνθεος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
enthusiasm ἐνθουσιασμός, enthusiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
epigram Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
euphoria Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
euripides, bacchae Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 74, 122, 142, 164
euripides, medea Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122
euripides, on the mother of the gods Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
euripides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122
evidence (of aeschylus dionysiac tetralogies), mythographic Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 74
frenzy, mania, madness Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 112
funerary cult, and music Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
furies Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 249
gaze Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 239
gift Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
hipponion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
hyacinthus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 239
hypsipyle, in euripides hypsipyle Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 249
hypsipyle, jason/argonauts and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 249
hypsipyle, vergils aeneid and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 249
intertextuality, hypsipyle story and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 249
jason and the argonauts Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 249
judas, and pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 142
kybele, as rhea Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
kybele Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
lityerses Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
lydia, lydian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 330
lydia and lydians, and phrygian symbols Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
lyric Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
madness (mania)/frenzy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122
maenads, maenadic, maenadism, rites/cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49, 330
maenads/maenadism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 74, 122
magna mater Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49, 312, 330
marsyas Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
mask, masked Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 312
meion Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
midas, and marsyas Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
midas, mother of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
midas Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
mother of the gods, and animals Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
mother of the gods, and music Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
mother of the gods, as daughter of phrygian king Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
mother of the gods, as mother of midas Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
mother of the gods, as rhea Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
mother of the gods, associated with mountains Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
mother of the gods, rites of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
music, musical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
music Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
mystery Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122, 164
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 312
night, nocturnal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 330
olbia/pontic olbia, olbian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
orpheus and eurydice, destruction of orpheus body and denial of burial Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 239
orphism, orphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
pattern (plot/thematic) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 164
pentheus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 112; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 330; Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 249; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 74, 122, 142
philosophy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
phrygia and phrygians, dominion of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
phrygia and phrygians, music of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
polyxo Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 249
possession, possessed Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
prodigies of dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 330
prologue/expository opening, of bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 74, 142
prologue/expository opening Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122
purification Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
reception, of dramatic conventions Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122
reception, of dramatic situations and themes Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 142, 164
redemption Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122, 142
refiguration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 74, 122
replacement/substitution of names Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 164
resemblances, pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 74
resemblances, reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122, 142, 164
resemblances, theban tetralogy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 74
resemblances, xantriae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 74
rhea Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
rite, ritual, maenadic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49, 312, 330
samothracian gods Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
satyr drama, satyr-play Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
scylas Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
scythia, scythian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
semele Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122
sexuality Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 384
sparagmos/dismemberment Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 74
sparagmos Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 112
theater, theatrical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 312
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49, 312, 330
thebes Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122, 142, 164
theomachos (–oi)/theomachia/theomachein Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 74, 142
theotokos (mother of god) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122, 142
thiasos θίασος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
tragedy, tragic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 312, 330
variations Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 164
venus/aphrodite Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 239, 249
vergil, aeneid, bacchic rites in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 249
vergil, aeneid, burial and mourning in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 239
vergil, aeneid, hypsipyle story, valerius and statius versions of Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 249
versnel, henrik Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 81
wine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 49, 312, 330
wizards Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 330
woman' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 330
woman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
xxii, lack of dramatic unity/staging problems Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122