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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5614
Euripides, Bacchae, 434-481


Πενθεῦ, πάρεσμεν τήνδʼ ἄγραν ἠγρευκότεςSERVANT: We are come, Pentheus, having hunted down this prey, for which thou didst send us forth; not in vain hath been our quest. We found our quarry tame; he did not fly from us, but yielded himself without a struggle; his cheek ne'er blanched, nor did his ruddy colour change, but with a smile he bade me bind and lead him away, and he waited, making my task an easy one. For very shame I said to him, "Against my will, sir stranger, do I lead thee hence, but Pentheus ordered it, who sent me hither." As for his votaries whom thou thyself didst check, seizing and binding them hand and foot in the public gaol, all these have loosed their bonds and fled into the meadows where they now are sporting, calling aloud on the Bromian god. Their chains fell off their feet of their own accord, and doors flew open without man's hand to help. Many a marvel hath this stranger brought with him to our city of Thebes; what yet remains must be thy care. PENTHEUS: Loose his hands; for now that I have him in the net he is scarce swift enough to elude me. So, sir stranger, thou art not ill-favoured from a woman's point of view, which was thy real object in coming to Thebes; thy hair is long because thou hast never been a wrestler, flowing right down thy cheeks most wantonly; thy skin is white to help thee gain thy end, not tanned by ray of sun, but kept within the shade, as thou goest in quest of love with beauty's bait. Come, tell me first of thy race. DIONYSUS: That needs no braggart's tongue, 'tis easily told; maybe thou knowest Tmolus by hearsay. PENTHEUS: I know it, the range that rings the city of Sardis round. DIONYSUS: Thence I come, Lydia is my native home.


Πενθεῦ, πάρεσμεν τήνδʼ ἄγραν ἠγρευκότεςPentheus, we are here, having caught this prey


ἐφʼ ἣν ἔπεμψας, οὐδʼ ἄκρανθʼ ὡρμήσαμεν.for which you sent us, nor have we set out in vain. This beast was docile in our hands and did not withdraw in flight, but yielded not unwillingly. He did not turn pale or change the wine-dark complexion of his cheek, but laughed and allowed us to bind him and lead him away.


ὁ θὴρ δʼ ὅδʼ ἡμῖν πρᾶος οὐδʼ ὑπέσπασενfor which you sent us, nor have we set out in vain. This beast was docile in our hands and did not withdraw in flight, but yielded not unwillingly. He did not turn pale or change the wine-dark complexion of his cheek, but laughed and allowed us to bind him and lead him away.


φυγῇ πόδʼ, ἀλλʼ ἔδωκεν οὐκ ἄκων χέραςfor which you sent us, nor have we set out in vain. This beast was docile in our hands and did not withdraw in flight, but yielded not unwillingly. He did not turn pale or change the wine-dark complexion of his cheek, but laughed and allowed us to bind him and lead him away.


οὐδʼ ὠχρός, οὐδʼ ἤλλαξεν οἰνωπὸν γένυνfor which you sent us, nor have we set out in vain. This beast was docile in our hands and did not withdraw in flight, but yielded not unwillingly. He did not turn pale or change the wine-dark complexion of his cheek, but laughed and allowed us to bind him and lead him away.


γελῶν δὲ καὶ δεῖν κἀπάγειν ἐφίετοfor which you sent us, nor have we set out in vain. This beast was docile in our hands and did not withdraw in flight, but yielded not unwillingly. He did not turn pale or change the wine-dark complexion of his cheek, but laughed and allowed us to bind him and lead him away.


ἔμενέ τε, τοὐμὸν εὐτρεπὲς ποιούμενος.He remained still, making my work easy, and I in shame said: Stranger, I do not lead you away willingly, but by order of Pentheus, who sent me. And the Bacchae whom you shut up, whom you carried off and bound in the chains of the public prison


κἀγὼ διʼ αἰδοῦς εἶπον· Ὦ ξένʼ, οὐχ ἑκὼνHe remained still, making my work easy, and I in shame said: Stranger, I do not lead you away willingly, but by order of Pentheus, who sent me. And the Bacchae whom you shut up, whom you carried off and bound in the chains of the public prison


ἄγω σε, Πενθέως δʼ ὅς μʼ ἔπεμψʼ ἐπιστολαῖς.He remained still, making my work easy, and I in shame said: Stranger, I do not lead you away willingly, but by order of Pentheus, who sent me. And the Bacchae whom you shut up, whom you carried off and bound in the chains of the public prison


nanHe remained still, making my work easy, and I in shame said: Stranger, I do not lead you away willingly, but by order of Pentheus, who sent me. And the Bacchae whom you shut up, whom you carried off and bound in the chains of the public prison


κἄδησας ἐν δεσμοῖσι πανδήμου στέγηςHe remained still, making my work easy, and I in shame said: Stranger, I do not lead you away willingly, but by order of Pentheus, who sent me. And the Bacchae whom you shut up, whom you carried off and bound in the chains of the public prison


φροῦδαί γʼ ἐκεῖναι λελυμέναι πρὸς ὀργάδαςare set loose and gone, and are gamboling in the meadows, invoking Bromius as their god. Of their own accord, the chains were loosed from their feet and keys opened the doors without human hand. This man has come to Thebe


σκιρτῶσι Βρόμιον ἀνακαλούμεναι θεόν·are set loose and gone, and are gamboling in the meadows, invoking Bromius as their god. Of their own accord, the chains were loosed from their feet and keys opened the doors without human hand. This man has come to Thebe


αὐτόματα δʼ αὐταῖς δεσμὰ διελύθη ποδῶνare set loose and gone, and are gamboling in the meadows, invoking Bromius as their god. Of their own accord, the chains were loosed from their feet and keys opened the doors without human hand. This man has come to Thebe


κλῇδές τʼ ἀνῆκαν θύρετρʼ ἄνευ θνητῆς χερός.are set loose and gone, and are gamboling in the meadows, invoking Bromius as their god. Of their own accord, the chains were loosed from their feet and keys opened the doors without human hand. This man has come to Thebe


πολλῶν δʼ ὅδʼ ἁνὴρ θαυμάτων ἥκει πλέωςare set loose and gone, and are gamboling in the meadows, invoking Bromius as their god. Of their own accord, the chains were loosed from their feet and keys opened the doors without human hand. This man has come to Thebe


ἐς τάσδε Θήβας. σοὶ δὲ τἄλλα χρὴ μέλειν. Πενθεύςfull of many wonders. You must take care of the rest. Pentheu


μέθεσθε χειρῶν τοῦδʼ· ἐν ἄρκυσιν γὰρ ὢνRelease his hands, for caught in the nets he is not so swift as to escape me. But your body is not ill-formed, stranger, for women’s purposes, for which reason you have come to Thebes .


οὐκ ἔστιν οὕτως ὠκὺς ὥστε μʼ ἐκφυγεῖν.Release his hands, for caught in the nets he is not so swift as to escape me. But your body is not ill-formed, stranger, for women’s purposes, for which reason you have come to Thebes .


nanRelease his hands, for caught in the nets he is not so swift as to escape me. But your body is not ill-formed, stranger, for women’s purposes, for which reason you have come to Thebes .


ὡς ἐς γυναῖκας, ἐφʼ ὅπερ ἐς Θήβας πάρει·Release his hands, for caught in the nets he is not so swift as to escape me. But your body is not ill-formed, stranger, for women’s purposes, for which reason you have come to Thebes .


πλόκαμός τε γάρ σου ταναός, οὐ πάλης ὕποFor your hair is long, not through wrestling, scattered over your cheeks, full of desire; and you have a white skin from careful preparation, hunting after Aphrodite by your beauty not exposed to strokes of the sun, but beneath the shade.


γένυν παρʼ αὐτὴν κεχυμένος, πόθου πλέως·For your hair is long, not through wrestling, scattered over your cheeks, full of desire; and you have a white skin from careful preparation, hunting after Aphrodite by your beauty not exposed to strokes of the sun, but beneath the shade.


λευκὴν δὲ χροιὰν ἐκ παρασκευῆς ἔχειςFor your hair is long, not through wrestling, scattered over your cheeks, full of desire; and you have a white skin from careful preparation, hunting after Aphrodite by your beauty not exposed to strokes of the sun, but beneath the shade.


οὐχ ἡλίου βολαῖσιν, ἀλλʼ ὑπὸ σκιᾶςFor your hair is long, not through wrestling, scattered over your cheeks, full of desire; and you have a white skin from careful preparation, hunting after Aphrodite by your beauty not exposed to strokes of the sun, but beneath the shade.


τὴν Ἀφροδίτην καλλονῇ θηρώμενος.For your hair is long, not through wrestling, scattered over your cheeks, full of desire; and you have a white skin from careful preparation, hunting after Aphrodite by your beauty not exposed to strokes of the sun, but beneath the shade.


πρῶτον μὲν οὖν μοι λέξον ὅστις εἶ γένος. ΔιόνυσοςFirst then tell me who your family is. Dionysu


οὐ κόμπος οὐδείς· ῥᾴδιον δʼ εἰπεῖν τόδε.I can tell you this easily, without boasting. I suppose you are familiar with flowery Tmolus. Pentheu


τὸν ἀνθεμώδη Τμῶλον οἶσθά που κλύων. ΠενθεύςI can tell you this easily, without boasting. I suppose you are familiar with flowery Tmolus. Pentheu


οἶδʼ, ὃς τὸ Σάρδεων ἄστυ περιβάλλει κύκλῳ. ΔιόνυσοςI know of it; it surrounds the city of Sardis . Dionysu


ἐντεῦθέν εἰμι, Λυδία δέ μοι πατρίς. ΠενθεύςPENTHEUS: What makes thee bring these mysteries to Hellas? DIONYSUS: Dionysus, the son of Zeus, initiated me. PENTHEUS: Is there a Zeus in Lydia, who begets new gods? DIONYSUS: No, but Zeus who married Semele in Hellas. PENTHEUS: Was it by night or in the face of day that he constrained thee? DIONYSUS: 'Twas face to face he intrusted his mysteries to me. PENTHEUS: Pray, what special feature stamps thy rites? DIONYSUS: That is a secret to be hidden from the uninitiated. PENTHEUS: What profit bring they to their votaries? DIONYSUS: Thou must not be told, though 'tis well worth knowing. PENTHEUS: A pretty piece of trickery, to excite my curiosity! DIONYSUS: A man of godless life is an abomination to the rites of the god. PENTHEUS: Thou sayest thou didst see the god clearly; what was he like? DIONYSUS: What his fancy chose; I was not there to order this. PENTHEUS: Another clever twist and turn of thine, without a word of answer. DIONYSUS: He were a fool, methinks, who would utter wisdom to a fool. PENTHEUS: Hast thou come hither first with this deity? DIONYSUS: All foreigners already celebrate these mysteries with dances. PENTHEUS: The reason being, they are far behind Hellenes in wisdom. DIONYSUS: In this at least far in advance, though their customs differ.


ἐντεῦθέν εἰμι, Λυδία δέ μοι πατρίς. ΠενθεύςI am from there, and Lydia is my fatherland. Pentheu


πόθεν δὲ τελετὰς τάσδʼ ἄγεις ἐς Ἑλλάδα; ΔιόνυσοςWhy do you bring these rites to Hellas ? Dionysu


Διόνυσος ἡμᾶς εἰσέβησʼ, ὁ τοῦ Διός. ΠενθεύςDionysus, the child of Zeus, sent me. Pentheu


Ζεὺς δʼ ἔστʼ ἐκεῖ τις, ὃς νέους τίκτει θεούς; ΔιόνυσοςIs there a Zeus who breeds new gods there? Dionysu


οὔκ, ἀλλʼ ὁ Σεμέλην ἐνθάδε ζεύξας γάμοις. ΠενθεύςNo, but the one who married Semele here. Pentheu


πότερα δὲ νύκτωρ σʼ ἢ κατʼ ὄμμʼ ἠνάγκασεν; ΔιόνυσοςDid he compel you at night, or in your sight? Dionysu


ὁρῶν ὁρῶντα, καὶ δίδωσιν ὄργια. ΠενθεύςSeeing me just as I saw him, he gave me sacred rites. Pentheu


τὰ δʼ ὄργιʼ ἐστὶ τίνʼ ἰδέαν ἔχοντά σοι; ΔιόνυσοςWhat appearance do your rites have? Dionysu


ἄρρητʼ ἀβακχεύτοισιν εἰδέναι βροτῶν. ΠενθεύςThey can not be told to mortals uninitiated in Bacchic revelry. Pentheu


ἔχει δʼ ὄνησιν τοῖσι θύουσιν τίνα; ΔιόνυσοςAnd do they have any profit to those who sacrifice? Dionysu


οὐ θέμις ἀκοῦσαί σʼ, ἔστι δʼ ἄξιʼ εἰδέναι. ΠενθεύςIt is not lawful for you to hear, but they are worth knowing. Pentheu


εὖ τοῦτʼ ἐκιβδήλευσας, ἵνʼ ἀκοῦσαι θέλω. ΔιόνυσοςYou have counterfeited this well, so that I desire to hear. Dionysu


ἀσέβειαν ἀσκοῦντʼ ὄργιʼ ἐχθαίρει θεοῦ. ΠενθεύςThe rites are hostile to whoever practices impiety. Pentheu


τὸν θεὸν ὁρᾶν γὰρ φῂς σαφῶς, ποῖός τις ἦν; ΔιόνυσοςAre you saying that you saw clearly what the god was like? Dionysu


ὁποῖος ἤθελʼ· οὐκ ἐγὼ ʼτασσον τόδε. ΠενθεύςHe was as he chose; I did not order this. Pentheu


τοῦτʼ αὖ παρωχέτευσας εὖ κοὐδὲν λέγων. ΔιόνυσοςAgain you diverted my question well, speaking mere nonsense. Dionysu


δόξει τις ἀμαθεῖ σοφὰ λέγων οὐκ εὖ φρονεῖν. ΠενθεύςOne will seem to be foolish if he speaks wisely to an ignorant man. Pentheu


ἦλθες δὲ πρῶτα δεῦρʼ ἄγων τὸν δαίμονα; ΔιόνυσοςDid you come here first, bringing the god? Dionysu


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Euripides, Bacchae, 116-119, 330-431, 435-491, 493-494, 498-502, 506-507, 511-514, 518, 576-656, 664-671, 676-861, 115 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

115. Βρόμιος ὅστις ἄγῃ θιάσουσ— 115. whoever leads the sacred band is Bromius—to the mountain, to the mountain, where the crowd of women waits, goaded away from their weaving by Dionysus. Choru
2. Euripides, Ion, 30 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

30. that dwell in glorious Athens, for well thou knowest Athena’s city, and take a new-born babe from out the hollow rock, his cradle and his swaddling-clothes as well, and bear him to my prophetic shrine at Delphi, and set him at the entering-in of my temple.
3. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 40 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 3.5.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.5.1. Διόνυσος δὲ εὑρετὴς ἀμπέλου γενόμενος, Ἥρας μανίαν αὐτῷ ἐμβαλούσης περιπλανᾶται Αἴγυπτόν τε καὶ Συρίαν. καὶ τὸ μὲν πρῶτον Πρωτεὺς αὐτὸν ὑποδέχεται βασιλεὺς Αἰγυπτίων, αὖθις δὲ εἰς Κύβελα τῆς Φρυγίας ἀφικνεῖται, κἀκεῖ καθαρθεὶς ὑπὸ Ῥέας καὶ τὰς τελετὰς ἐκμαθών, καὶ λαβὼν παρʼ ἐκείνης τὴν στολήν, ἐπὶ Ἰνδοὺς 1 -- διὰ τῆς Θράκης ἠπείγετο. Λυκοῦργος δὲ παῖς Δρύαντος, Ἠδωνῶν βασιλεύων, οἳ Στρυμόνα ποταμὸν παροικοῦσι, πρῶτος ὑβρίσας ἐξέβαλεν αὐτόν. καὶ Διόνυσος μὲν εἰς θάλασσαν πρὸς Θέτιν τὴν Νηρέως κατέφυγε, Βάκχαι δὲ ἐγένοντο αἰχμάλωτοι καὶ τὸ συνεπόμενον Σατύρων πλῆθος αὐτῷ. αὖθις δὲ αἱ Βάκχαι ἐλύθησαν ἐξαίφνης, Λυκούργῳ δὲ μανίαν ἐνεποίησε 2 -- Διόνυσος. ὁ δὲ μεμηνὼς Δρύαντα τὸν παῖδα, ἀμπέλου νομίζων κλῆμα κόπτειν, πελέκει πλήξας ἀπέκτεινε, καὶ ἀκρωτηριάσας αὐτὸν ἐσωφρόνησε. 1 -- τῆς δὲ γῆς ἀκάρπου μενούσης, ἔχρησεν ὁ θεὸς καρποφορήσειν αὐτήν, ἂν θανατωθῇ Λυκοῦργος. Ἠδωνοὶ δὲ ἀκούσαντες εἰς τὸ Παγγαῖον αὐτὸν ἀπαγαγόντες ὄρος ἔδησαν, κἀκεῖ κατὰ Διονύσου βούλησιν ὑπὸ ἵππων διαφθαρεὶς ἀπέθανε.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agave Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
anger (orgē) Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 221
antithesis Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 221
bacchus Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 221
captivity/imprisonment/enslavement Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 151
cithaeron Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
colloquialisms Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
delphi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
dionysus Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 221
euripides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
fear Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 221
joseph of arimathea Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 151
liberation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 151
lycurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 151
messengers/messenger-speech Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
pentheus Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 221; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126, 151
prologue/expository opening Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
reception, of dramatic conventions Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
reception, of dramatic situations and themes Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 151
refiguration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 151
resemblances, edonoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 151
resemblances, reception' Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 151
resemblances, reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
theotokos (mother of god) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 126
war Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 221
women Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 221