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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5614
Euripides, Bacchae, 4


μορφὴν δʼ ἀμείψας ἐκ θεοῦ βροτησίανI, the son of Zeus, have come to this land of the Thebans—Dionysus, whom once Semele, Kadmos’ daughter, bore, delivered by a lightning-bearing flame. And having taken a mortal form instead of a god’s


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

19 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.138-6.140 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.138. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.139. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.140. /and he lived not for long, seeing that he was hated of all the immortal gods. So would not I be minded to fight against the blessed gods. But if thou art of men, who eat the fruit of the field, draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. Then spake to him the glorious son of Hippolochus:
2. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 147-164, 146 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)

146. No longer struggling, you loosed them all.
3. Hymn To Apollo, To Apollo, 157 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

4. Hymn To Dionysus, To Dionysus, 50 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

50. He was a shaggy bear, rapaciously
5. Aeschylus, Persians, 1060, 1030 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1030. πέπλον δʼ ἐπέρρηξʼ ἐπὶ συμφορᾷ κακοῦ. Χορός 1030. And I rent my robe at the disastrous event. Chorus
6. Aristophanes, Clouds, 604-606, 603 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

603. Παρνασσίαν θ' ὃς κατέχων
7. Aristophanes, Frogs, 631 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

631. ἀθάνατος εἶναί φημι Διόνυσος Διός
8. Euripides, Bacchae, 10, 100-101, 1017-1019, 102, 1021, 103-104, 1083-1084, 11-12, 120-125, 1255, 126-129, 13, 130-134, 1341, 1349, 1388-1389, 14-19, 2, 20-23, 235-236, 24-27, 274-276, 28, 286-289, 29, 290-297, 3, 30-31, 312-317, 32, 325, 328-329, 33-35, 353, 36-39, 395-399, 40, 400-402, 41-43, 439, 44-49, 5, 50-52, 521-529, 53-59, 592-595, 6, 60-61, 616-619, 62-63, 7-8, 84, 88-89, 9, 90-99, 998-999, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. ἥκω Διὸς παῖς τήνδε Θηβαίων χθόνα 1. I, the son of Zeus, have come to this land of the Thebans—Dionysus, whom once Semele, Kadmos’ daughter, bore, delivered by a lightning-bearing flame. And having taken a mortal form instead of a god’s
9. Euripides, Ion, 714-718, 1068 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Herodotus, Histories, 2.49, 2.173-2.174, 3.40-3.43, 4.36 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.49. Now then, it seems to me that Melampus son of Amytheon was not ignorant of but was familiar with this sacrifice. For Melampus was the one who taught the Greeks the name of Dionysus and the way of sacrificing to him and the phallic procession; he did not exactly unveil the subject taking all its details into consideration, for the teachers who came after him made a fuller revelation; but it was from him that the Greeks learned to bear the phallus along in honor of Dionysus, and they got their present practice from his teaching. ,I say, then, that Melampus acquired the prophetic art, being a discerning man, and that, besides many other things which he learned from Egypt, he also taught the Greeks things concerning Dionysus, altering few of them; for I will not say that what is done in Egypt in connection with the god and what is done among the Greeks originated independently: for they would then be of an Hellenic character and not recently introduced. ,Nor again will I say that the Egyptians took either this or any other custom from the Greeks. But I believe that Melampus learned the worship of Dionysus chiefly from Cadmus of Tyre and those who came with Cadmus from Phoenicia to the land now called Boeotia . 2.173. The following was how he scheduled his affairs: in the morning, until the the hour when the marketplace filled, he readily conducted whatever business was brought to him; the rest of the day, he drank and joked at the expense of his companions and was idle and playful. ,But this displeased his friends, who admonished him thus: “O King, you do not conduct yourself well by indulging too much in vulgarity. You, a celebrated man, ought to conduct your business throughout the day, sitting on a celebrated throne; and thus the Egyptians would know that they are governed by a great man, and you would be better spoken of; as it is, what you do is by no means kingly.” ,But he answered them like this: “Men that have bows string them when they must use them, and unstring them when they have used them; were bows kept strung forever, they would break, and so could not be used when needed. ,Such, too, is the nature of man. Were one to be always at serious work and not permit oneself a bit of relaxation, he would go mad or idiotic before he knew it; I am well aware of that, and give each of the two its turn.” Such was his answer to his friends. 2.174. It is said that even when Amasis was a private man he was fond of drinking and joking and was not at all a sober man; and that when his drinking and pleasure-seeking cost him the bare necessities, he would go around stealing. Then when he contradicted those who said that he had their possessions, they would bring him to whatever place of divination was nearby, and sometimes the oracles declared him guilty and sometimes they acquitted him. ,When he became king, he did not take care of the shrines of the gods who had acquitted him of theft, or give them anything for maintece, or make it his practice to sacrifice there, for he knew them to be worthless and their oracles false; but he took scrupulous care of the gods who had declared his guilt, considering them to be gods in very deed and their oracles infallible. 3.40. Now Amasis was somehow aware of Polycrates' great good fortune; and as this continued to increase greatly, he wrote this letter and sent it to Samos : “Amasis addresses Polycrates as follows. ,It is pleasant to learn that a friend and ally is doing well. But I do not like these great successes of yours; for I know the gods, how jealous they are, and I desire somehow that both I and those for whom I care succeed in some affairs, fail in others, and thus pass life faring differently by turns, rather than succeed at everything. ,For from all I have heard I know of no man whom continual good fortune did not bring in the end to evil, and utter destruction. Therefore if you will be ruled by me do this regarding your successes: ,consider what you hold most precious and what you will be sorriest to lose, and cast it away so that it shall never again be seen among men; then, if after this the successes that come to you are not mixed with mischances, strive to mend the matter as I have counselled you.” 3.41. Reading this, and perceiving that Amasis' advice was good, Polycrates considered which of his treasures it would most grieve his soul to lose, and came to this conclusion: he wore a seal set in gold, an emerald, crafted by Theodorus son of Telecles of Samos ; ,being resolved to cast this away, he embarked in a fifty-oared ship with its crew, and told them to put out to sea; and when he was far from the island, he took off the seal-ring in sight of all that were on the ship and cast it into the sea. This done, he sailed back and went to his house, where he grieved for the loss. 3.42. But on the fifth or sixth day from this it happened that a fisherman, who had taken a fine and great fish, and desired to make a gift of it to Polycrates, brought it to the door and said that he wished to see Polycrates. This being granted, he gave the fish, saying: ,“O King, when I caught this fish, I thought best not to take it to market, although I am a man who lives by his hands, but it seemed to me worthy of you and your greatness; and so I bring and offer it to you.” Polycrates was pleased with what the fisherman said; “You have done very well,” he answered, “and I give you double thanks, for your words and for the gift; and I invite you to dine with me.” ,Proud of this honor, the fisherman went home; but the servants, cutting up the fish, found in its belly Polycrates' seal-ring. ,As soon as they saw and seized it, they brought it with joy to Polycrates, and giving the ring to him told him how it had been found. Polycrates saw the hand of heaven in this matter; he wrote a letter and sent it to Egypt, telling all that he had done, and what had happened to him. 3.43. When Amasis had read Polycrates' letter, he perceived that no man could save another from his destiny, and that Polycrates, being so continually fortunate that he even found what he cast away, must come to an evil end. ,So he sent a herald to Samos to renounce his friendship, determined that when some great and terrible mischance overtook Polycrates he himself might not have to sadden his heart for a friend. 4.36. I have said this much of the Hyperboreans, and let it suffice; for I do not tell the story of that Abaris, alleged to be a Hyperborean, who carried the arrow over the whole world, fasting all the while. But if there are men beyond the north wind, then there are others beyond the south. ,And I laugh to see how many have before now drawn maps of the world, not one of them reasonably; for they draw the world as round as if fashioned by compasses, encircled by the Ocean river, and Asia and Europe of a like extent. For myself, I will in a few words indicate the extent of the two, and how each should be drawn.
11. Sophocles, Antigone, 1116-1154, 1115 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Aristotle, Poetics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

13. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 3.62.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.62.6.  And though the writers of myths have handed down the account of a third birth as well, at which, as they say, the Sons of Gaia tore to pieces the god, who was a son of Zeus and Demeter, and boiled him, but his members were brought together again by Demeter and he experienced a new birth as if for the first time, such accounts as this they trace back to certain causes found in nature.
14. Cornutus, De Natura Deorum, 30 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. New Testament, Acts, 5.39, 11.17 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.39. But if it is of God, you will not be able to overthrow it, and you would be found even to be fighting against God! 11.17. If then God gave to them the same gift as us, when we believed in the Lord Jesus Christ, who was I, that I could withstand God?
16. New Testament, John, 1.14, 3.31, 11.27 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.14. The Word became flesh, and lived among us. We saw his glory, such glory as of the one and only Son of the Father, full of grace and truth. 3.31. He who comes from above is above all. He who is from the Earth belongs to the Earth, and speaks of the Earth. He who comes from heaven is above all. 11.27. She said to him, "Yes, Lord. I have come to believe that you are the Christ, God's Son, he who comes into the world.
17. New Testament, Luke, 1.35 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.35. The angel answered her, "The Holy Spirit will come on you, and the power of the Most High will overshadow you. Therefore also the holy one who is born from you will be called the Son of God.
18. New Testament, Matthew, 28.16-28.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

28.16. But the eleven disciples went into Galilee, to the mountain where Jesus had sent them. 28.17. When they saw him, they bowed down to him, but some doubted. 28.18. Jesus came to them and spoke to them, saying, "All authority has been given to me in heaven and on earth. 28.19. Go, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit 28.20. teaching them to observe all things which I commanded you. Behold, I am with you always, even to the end of the age." Amen.
19. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 59



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achaemenid, reliefs Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 33
aeschylus, persians Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 33
agave Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 113
altar Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 308
anacreontics Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 33
anti-hero, dionysus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 113
apollo, apollonian, apolline Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
apollo, dionysus, association with Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 157
apollo, sacking of delphi predicted in bacchae Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 157
apollo, teiresias in bacchae as prophet of Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 157
archaeology Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 113
ares, ares enyalios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
ares Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
arrival Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
asia, asia minor Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 27
asia Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 33; Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 23
asians, clothing Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 33
asians, women Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 33
asians Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 33
athenians at sparta (speech of), and greatest things (fear, honour, and advantage) Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 152
bacchae Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 378
barbarians Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 27
billings, j. xviii Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 378
bull Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 113
cadmus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 113; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122, 165
characters Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 378
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
cithaeron Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122
clappers κρόταλον Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
context/environment/milieu, socio-cultural, ideological Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 142, 165
cowardice Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 33
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 308
cult-establishment/foundation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 142, 165
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122, 142, 165
cults, dionysiac Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 23
cults, foreign cult Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 23
cults, greek Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 23
cults, mystery-cult Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 27
cults, of the mother of the gods Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 23
cults Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 27
cymbals ῥόπτρον Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
deity, foreign Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 27
deity Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 27
dionysiac/dionysian, cult Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 23
dionysiac cult Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 35
dionyso(u)s Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 378
dionysos, dionysos enyalios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
dionysos, dionysos xenos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 306, 308
dionysos, epiphany Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 306, 308, 329
dionysos, prodigies Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 329
dionysos, punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 306
dionysos/dionysus Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 23, 27
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88, 306, 308, 329
dionysus, birth de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 63
dirce Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 329
disguise, of gods Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 113
dithyramb Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
divine, the (τὸ θεῖον, τὸ δαιμόνιον etc.), in euripides Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 152
dolphin Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 113
dream imagery, dionysiac Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 35
ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
effeminate Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 27
egypt Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 23, 27
eleusis/eleusinian mysteries Jeong, Pauline Baptism among the Mysteries: Ritual Messages and the Promise of Initiation (2023) 84
epiphany, passim – meaning, exclusive, epilogue epiphany Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 113
euripides, and naturalistic representation of divine forces Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 152
euripides, bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122, 142, 165
euripides, medea Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122
euripides Jeong, Pauline Baptism among the Mysteries: Ritual Messages and the Promise of Initiation (2023) 84; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122
excess (see also luxury and eros) Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 33
female Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 306
fire Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
foreign, cult Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 23
foreign, deity/deities Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 27
foreign, import Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 23
foreign, new-comer from asia Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 23
foreign, sages Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 23, 27
frenzy, frenzied Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
gender, male Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 113
great dionysia, city dionysia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 308
great mother Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
greece Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 27
greek, authors Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 23
greek, culture Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 23, 27
helen, and paris Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 33
hellenistic, age/era/period Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 23
homer Jeong, Pauline Baptism among the Mysteries: Ritual Messages and the Promise of Initiation (2023) 84
identity, identity and morality Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 27
initiands/initiates/initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 165
inspiration Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
intercultural Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 27
ismenus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 329
jerusalem Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 165
jesus christ, and dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 165
jesus christ Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 165
judas, and pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 142
kadmos, kadmeian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 306
life de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 63
lightning Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
lion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 113
luxury (see also excess) Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 33
lydia, lydian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 306
lydia, xanthus of Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 23
lydia Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 33
madness (mania)/frenzy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
maenads/maenadism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122
maenads Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 113
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88, 329
metamorphosis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 308
mother (of the gods) Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 23, 27
murder, murderous Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 306
muses Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
music, musical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
mystery Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122, 165
mystery cult Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 35
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 306, 308
naiades Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
olympian gods Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 113
on high, staging of gods Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 113
orgiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
oriental, luxury Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 33
paris (see also helen and paris) Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 33
parody Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 113
pentheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 306; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122, 142, 165
persian, magus Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 23
persians Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 33
peter-cornelius narrative and visions, intertextual approaches, euripides' bacchai" Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 35
peter-cornelius narrative and visions, intertextual approaches, graeco-roman Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 35
phrygian, goddess Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 27
polis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 306, 308; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 165
prodigies of dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 329
prologue/expository opening, of bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 142
prologue/expository opening Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122
prophet, prophetic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 306
reception, of dramatic conventions Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122
reception, of dramatic situations and themes Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 142, 165
redemption Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122, 142
refiguration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122, 165
resemblances, reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122, 142, 165
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 308
ritual Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 27
seaford, richard Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 157
secret/secrecy Jeong, Pauline Baptism among the Mysteries: Ritual Messages and the Promise of Initiation (2023) 84
semele Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88; Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 157; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122, 165
smiling, of deities Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 113
snake Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 113
sophia, wisdom in bacchae Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 157
stance in greek tragedy Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 113
substantivized neuter phrases, based on adjectives Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 152
tambourine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88
theater, theatrical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 306, 308
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 306, 308, 329
thebes Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122, 142, 165
theomachos (–oi)/theomachia/theomachein Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 142, 165
theotokos (mother of god) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122, 142, 165
thiasos θίασος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 306
thrace Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 27
thymele θυμέλη Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 308
tiresias Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 113
tragedy, tragic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 306, 329
tragedy (see also theatricality) Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 33
tyranny, tyrants Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 23
variations Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 165
violence/violent Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 306
water' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 329
women Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 113
xenia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 306
xerxes (see also great king) Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 33
xxii, lack of dramatic unity/staging problems Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 122
zagreus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 63
zeus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 88; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 113; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 378
zoroaster Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 23
νικάω Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 152