Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5614
Euripides, Bacchae, 329-411


τιμῶν τε Βρόμιον σωφρονεῖς, μέγαν θεόν. ΚάδμοςOld man, you do not shame Phoebus with your words, and honoring Dionysus, a great god, you are prudent. Kadmo


ὦ παῖ, καλῶς σοι Τειρεσίας παρῄνεσεν.My child, Teiresias has advised you well. Dwell with us, not apart from the laws. For now you flit about and have thoughts without thinking. Even if, as you say, he is not a god, call him one; and tell a glorious falsehood


οἴκει μεθʼ ἡμῶν, μὴ θύραζε τῶν νόμων.My child, Teiresias has advised you well. Dwell with us, not apart from the laws. For now you flit about and have thoughts without thinking. Even if, as you say, he is not a god, call him one; and tell a glorious falsehood


νῦν γὰρ πέτῃ τε καὶ φρονῶν οὐδὲν φρονεῖς.My child, Teiresias has advised you well. Dwell with us, not apart from the laws. For now you flit about and have thoughts without thinking. Even if, as you say, he is not a god, call him one; and tell a glorious falsehood


κεἰ μὴ γὰρ ἔστιν ὁ θεὸς οὗτος, ὡς σὺ φῄςMy child, Teiresias has advised you well. Dwell with us, not apart from the laws. For now you flit about and have thoughts without thinking. Even if, as you say, he is not a god, call him one; and tell a glorious falsehood


παρὰ σοὶ λεγέσθω· καὶ καταψεύδου καλῶςMy child, Teiresias has advised you well. Dwell with us, not apart from the laws. For now you flit about and have thoughts without thinking. Even if, as you say, he is not a god, call him one; and tell a glorious falsehood


ὡς ἔστι, Σεμέλη θʼ ἵνα δοκῇ θεὸν τεκεῖνo that Semele might seem to have borne a god, and honor might come to all our race. You see the wretched fate of Actaeon, who was torn apart in the meadows by the blood-thirsty hounds he had raised


ἡμῖν τε τιμὴ παντὶ τῷ γένει προσῇ.o that Semele might seem to have borne a god, and honor might come to all our race. You see the wretched fate of Actaeon, who was torn apart in the meadows by the blood-thirsty hounds he had raised


nano that Semele might seem to have borne a god, and honor might come to all our race. You see the wretched fate of Actaeon, who was torn apart in the meadows by the blood-thirsty hounds he had raised


ὃν ὠμόσιτοι σκύλακες ἃς ἐθρέψατοo that Semele might seem to have borne a god, and honor might come to all our race. You see the wretched fate of Actaeon, who was torn apart in the meadows by the blood-thirsty hounds he had raised


διεσπάσαντο, κρείσσονʼ ἐν κυναγίαιςo that Semele might seem to have borne a god, and honor might come to all our race. You see the wretched fate of Actaeon, who was torn apart in the meadows by the blood-thirsty hounds he had raised


Ἀρτέμιδος εἶναι κομπάσαντʼ, ἐν ὀργάσιν.having boasted that he was superior in the hunt to Artemis. May you not suffer this. Come, let me crown your head with ivy; honor the god along with us. Pentheu


ὃ μὴ πάθῃς σύ· δεῦρό σου στέψω κάραhaving boasted that he was superior in the hunt to Artemis. May you not suffer this. Come, let me crown your head with ivy; honor the god along with us. Pentheu


κισσῷ· μεθʼ ἡμῶν τῷ θεῷ τιμὴν δίδου. Πενθεύςhaving boasted that he was superior in the hunt to Artemis. May you not suffer this. Come, let me crown your head with ivy; honor the god along with us. Pentheu


οὐ μὴ προσοίσεις χεῖρα, βακχεύσεις δʼ ἰώνDon’t lay a hand on me! Go off and hold your revels, but don’t wipe your foolishness off on me. I will seek the punishment of thi


μηδʼ ἐξομόρξῃ μωρίαν τὴν σὴν ἐμοί;Don’t lay a hand on me! Go off and hold your revels, but don’t wipe your foolishness off on me. I will seek the punishment of thi


τῆς σῆς δʼ ἀνοίας τόνδε τὸν διδάσκαλονteacher of your folly. Let someone go quickly to the seat where he watches the flights of birds, upset and overturn it with levers, turning everything upside down;


δίκην μέτειμι. στειχέτω τις ὡς τάχοςteacher of your folly. Let someone go quickly to the seat where he watches the flights of birds, upset and overturn it with levers, turning everything upside down;


ἐλθὼν δὲ θάκους τοῦδʼ ἵνʼ οἰωνοσκοπεῖteacher of your folly. Let someone go quickly to the seat where he watches the flights of birds, upset and overturn it with levers, turning everything upside down;


μοχλοῖς τριαίνου κἀνάτρεψον ἔμπαλινteacher of your folly. Let someone go quickly to the seat where he watches the flights of birds, upset and overturn it with levers, turning everything upside down;


ἄνω κάτω τὰ πάντα συγχέας ὁμοῦteacher of your folly. Let someone go quickly to the seat where he watches the flights of birds, upset and overturn it with levers, turning everything upside down;


καὶ στέμματʼ ἀνέμοις καὶ θυέλλαισιν μέθες.and release his garlands to the winds and storms. In this way I will especially wound him. And some of you hunt throughout the city for this effeminate stranger, who introduces a new disease to women and pollutes our beds.


μάλιστα γάρ νιν δήξομαι δράσας τάδε.and release his garlands to the winds and storms. In this way I will especially wound him. And some of you hunt throughout the city for this effeminate stranger, who introduces a new disease to women and pollutes our beds.


nanand release his garlands to the winds and storms. In this way I will especially wound him. And some of you hunt throughout the city for this effeminate stranger, who introduces a new disease to women and pollutes our beds.


τὸν θηλύμορφον ξένον, ὃς ἐσφέρει νόσονand release his garlands to the winds and storms. In this way I will especially wound him. And some of you hunt throughout the city for this effeminate stranger, who introduces a new disease to women and pollutes our beds.


καινὴν γυναιξὶ καὶ λέχη λυμαίνεται.and release his garlands to the winds and storms. In this way I will especially wound him. And some of you hunt throughout the city for this effeminate stranger, who introduces a new disease to women and pollutes our beds.


κἄνπερ λάβητε, δέσμιον πορεύσατεIf you catch him, bring him here bound, so that he might suffer as punishment a death by stoning, having seen a bitter Bacchic revelry in Thebes . Teiresia


δεῦρʼ αὐτόν, ὡς ἂν λευσίμου δίκης τυχὼνIf you catch him, bring him here bound, so that he might suffer as punishment a death by stoning, having seen a bitter Bacchic revelry in Thebes . Teiresia


θάνῃ, πικρὰν βάκχευσιν ἐν Θήβαις ἰδών. ΤειρεσίαςIf you catch him, bring him here bound, so that he might suffer as punishment a death by stoning, having seen a bitter Bacchic revelry in Thebes . Teiresia


ὦ σχέτλιʼ, ὡς οὐκ οἶσθα ποῦ ποτʼ εἶ λόγων.TEIRESIAS: Unhappy wretch! thou little knowest what thou art saying. Now art thou become a raving madman, even before unsound in mind. Let us away, Cadmus, and pray earnestly for him, spite of his savage temper, and likewise for the city, that the god inflict not a signal vengeance. Come, follow me with thy ivy-wreathed staff; try to support my tottering frame as I do thine, for it is unseemly that two old men should fall; but let that-pass. For we must serve the Bacchic god, the son of Zeus. Only, Cadmus, beware lest Pentheus' bring sorrow to thy house; it is not my prophetic art, but circumstances that lead me to say this; for the words of a fool are folly. EXEUNT CADMUS and TEIRESIAS. CHORUS: O holiness, queen amongst the gods, sweeping on golden pinion o'er the earth! dost hear the words of Pentheus, dost hear his proud blaspheming Bromius, the son of Semele; first of all the blessed gods at every merry festival? His it is to rouse the revellers to dance, to laugh away dull care, and wake the flute, whene'er at banquets of the gods the luscious grape appears, or when the winecup in the feast sheds sleep on men who wear the ivy-spray. The end of all unbridled speech and lawless senselessness is misery; but the life of calm repose and the rule of reason abide unshaken and support the home; for far away in heaven though they dwell, the powers divine behold man's state. Sophistry is not wisdom, and to indulge in thoughts beyond man's ken is to shorten life; and if a man on such poor terms should aim too high, he may miss the pleasures in his reach. These, to my mind, are the ways of madmen and idiots. Oh! to make my way to Cyprus, isle of Aphrodite, where dwell the love-gods strong to soothe man's soul, or to Paphos, which that foreign river, never fed by rain, enriches with its hundred mouths! Oh! lead me, Bromian god, celestial guide of Bacchic pilgrims, to the hallowed slopes of Olympus, where Pierian Muses have their haunt most fair. There dwell the Graces; there is soft desire; there thy votaries may hold their revels freely. The joy of our god, the son of Zeus, is in banquets, his delight is in peace, that giver of riches and nurse divine of youth. Both to rich and poor alike hath he granted the delight of wine, that makes all pain to cease; hateful to him is every one who careth not to live the life of bliss, that lasts through days and nights of joy. True wisdom is to keep the heart and soul aloof from over-subtle wits. That which the less enlightened crowd approves and practises, will I accept. Re-enter PENTHEUS. Enter SERVANT bringing DIONYSUS bound.


ὦ σχέτλιʼ, ὡς οὐκ οἶσθα ποῦ ποτʼ εἶ λόγων.O wretched man, how little you know what you are saying! You are mad now, and even before you were out of your wits.


μέμηνας ἤδη· καὶ πρὶν ἐξέστης φρενῶν.O wretched man, how little you know what you are saying! You are mad now, and even before you were out of your wits.


στείχωμεν ἡμεῖς, Κάδμε, κἀξαιτώμεθαLet us go, Kadmos, and entreat the god, on behalf of him, though he is savage, and on behalf of the city, to do no ill. But follow me with the ivy-clad staff, and try to support my body, and I will try to support yours;


ὑπέρ τε τούτου καίπερ ὄντος ἀγρίουLet us go, Kadmos, and entreat the god, on behalf of him, though he is savage, and on behalf of the city, to do no ill. But follow me with the ivy-clad staff, and try to support my body, and I will try to support yours;


ὑπέρ τε πόλεως τὸν θεὸν μηδὲν νέονLet us go, Kadmos, and entreat the god, on behalf of him, though he is savage, and on behalf of the city, to do no ill. But follow me with the ivy-clad staff, and try to support my body, and I will try to support yours;


δρᾶν. ἀλλʼ ἕπου μοι κισσίνου βάκτρου μέταLet us go, Kadmos, and entreat the god, on behalf of him, though he is savage, and on behalf of the city, to do no ill. But follow me with the ivy-clad staff, and try to support my body, and I will try to support yours;


πειρῶ δʼ ἀνορθοῦν σῶμʼ ἐμόν, κἀγὼ τὸ σόν·Let us go, Kadmos, and entreat the god, on behalf of him, though he is savage, and on behalf of the city, to do no ill. But follow me with the ivy-clad staff, and try to support my body, and I will try to support yours;


γέροντε δʼ αἰσχρὸν δύο πεσεῖν· ἴτω δʼ ὅμωςit would be shameful for two old men to fall down. But let that pass, for we must serve Bacchus, the son of Zeus. Beware lest Pentheus bring trouble to your house, Kadmos; I do not speak in prophecy, but judging from the state of things; for a foolish man speaks foolishness. Choru


τῷ Βακχίῳ γὰρ τῷ Διὸς δουλευτέον.it would be shameful for two old men to fall down. But let that pass, for we must serve Bacchus, the son of Zeus. Beware lest Pentheus bring trouble to your house, Kadmos; I do not speak in prophecy, but judging from the state of things; for a foolish man speaks foolishness. Choru


Πενθεὺς δʼ ὅπως μὴ πένθος εἰσοίσει δόμοιςit would be shameful for two old men to fall down. But let that pass, for we must serve Bacchus, the son of Zeus. Beware lest Pentheus bring trouble to your house, Kadmos; I do not speak in prophecy, but judging from the state of things; for a foolish man speaks foolishness. Choru


τοῖς σοῖσι, Κάδμε· μαντικῇ μὲν οὐ λέγωit would be shameful for two old men to fall down. But let that pass, for we must serve Bacchus, the son of Zeus. Beware lest Pentheus bring trouble to your house, Kadmos; I do not speak in prophecy, but judging from the state of things; for a foolish man speaks foolishness. Choru


τοῖς πράγμασιν δέ· μῶρα γὰρ μῶρος λέγει. Χορόςit would be shameful for two old men to fall down. But let that pass, for we must serve Bacchus, the son of Zeus. Beware lest Pentheus bring trouble to your house, Kadmos; I do not speak in prophecy, but judging from the state of things; for a foolish man speaks foolishness. Choru


Ὁσία πότνα θεῶνHoliness, queen of the gods, Holiness, who bear your golden wings along the earth, do you hear these words from Pentheus? Do you hear his unholy


Ὁσία δʼ ἃ κατὰ γᾶνHoliness, queen of the gods, Holiness, who bear your golden wings along the earth, do you hear these words from Pentheus? Do you hear his unholy


χρυσέαν πτέρυγα φέρειςHoliness, queen of the gods, Holiness, who bear your golden wings along the earth, do you hear these words from Pentheus? Do you hear his unholy


τάδε Πενθέως ἀίεις;Holiness, queen of the gods, Holiness, who bear your golden wings along the earth, do you hear these words from Pentheus? Do you hear his unholy


ἀίεις οὐχ ὁσίανHoliness, queen of the gods, Holiness, who bear your golden wings along the earth, do you hear these words from Pentheus? Do you hear his unholy


ὕβριν ἐς τὸν Βρόμιον, τὸνinsolence against Bromius, the child of Semele, the first deity of the gods at the banquets where guests wear beautiful garlands? He holds this office, to join in dances


Σεμέλας, τὸν παρὰ καλλιστεφάνοις insolence against Bromius, the child of Semele, the first deity of the gods at the banquets where guests wear beautiful garlands? He holds this office, to join in dances


εὐφροσύναις δαίμονα insolence against Bromius, the child of Semele, the first deity of the gods at the banquets where guests wear beautiful garlands? He holds this office, to join in dances


πρῶτον μακάρων; ὃς τάδʼ ἔχειinsolence against Bromius, the child of Semele, the first deity of the gods at the banquets where guests wear beautiful garlands? He holds this office, to join in dances


θιασεύειν τε χοροῖςinsolence against Bromius, the child of Semele, the first deity of the gods at the banquets where guests wear beautiful garlands? He holds this office, to join in dances


μετά τʼ αὐλοῦ γελάσαιto laugh with the flute, and to bring an end to cares, whenever the delight of the grape comes at the feasts of the gods, and in ivy-bearing banquet


ἀποπαῦσαί τε μερίμναςto laugh with the flute, and to bring an end to cares, whenever the delight of the grape comes at the feasts of the gods, and in ivy-bearing banquet


ὁπόταν βότρυος ἔλθῃto laugh with the flute, and to bring an end to cares, whenever the delight of the grape comes at the feasts of the gods, and in ivy-bearing banquet


γάνος ἐν δαιτὶ θεῶν, κισσοφόροις to laugh with the flute, and to bring an end to cares, whenever the delight of the grape comes at the feasts of the gods, and in ivy-bearing banquet


δʼ ἐν θαλίαις ἀνδράσι to laugh with the flute, and to bring an end to cares, whenever the delight of the grape comes at the feasts of the gods, and in ivy-bearing banquet


κρατὴρ ὕπνον ἀμφιβάλλῃ Χορόςthe goblet sheds sleep over men. Choru


ἀχαλίνων στομάτωνMisfortune is the result of unbridled mouths and lawless folly; but the life of quiet


ἀνόμου τʼ ἀφροσύναςMisfortune is the result of unbridled mouths and lawless folly; but the life of quiet


τὸ τέλος δυστυχία·Misfortune is the result of unbridled mouths and lawless folly; but the life of quiet


ὁ δὲ τᾶς ἡσυχίαςMisfortune is the result of unbridled mouths and lawless folly; but the life of quiet


βίοτος καὶ τὸ φρονεῖνand wisdom remain unshaken and hold houses together. Though they dwell far off in the heavens the gods see the deeds of mortals.


ἀσάλευτόν τε μένει καὶand wisdom remain unshaken and hold houses together. Though they dwell far off in the heavens the gods see the deeds of mortals.


συνέχει δώματα· πόρσωand wisdom remain unshaken and hold houses together. Though they dwell far off in the heavens the gods see the deeds of mortals.


γὰρ ὅμως αἰθέρα ναίοντες and wisdom remain unshaken and hold houses together. Though they dwell far off in the heavens the gods see the deeds of mortals.


ὁρῶσιν τὰ βροτῶν οὐρανίδαι.and wisdom remain unshaken and hold houses together. Though they dwell far off in the heavens the gods see the deeds of mortals.


τὸ σοφὸν δʼ οὐ σοφίαBut cleverness is not wisdom, nor is thinking on things unfit for mortals. Life is short, and on this account the one who pursues great things does not achieve that which is present. In my opinion


τό τε μὴ θνητὰ φρονεῖν.But cleverness is not wisdom, nor is thinking on things unfit for mortals. Life is short, and on this account the one who pursues great things does not achieve that which is present. In my opinion


βραχὺς αἰών· ἐπὶ τούτῳBut cleverness is not wisdom, nor is thinking on things unfit for mortals. Life is short, and on this account the one who pursues great things does not achieve that which is present. In my opinion


δέ τις ἂν μεγάλα διώκωνBut cleverness is not wisdom, nor is thinking on things unfit for mortals. Life is short, and on this account the one who pursues great things does not achieve that which is present. In my opinion


τὰ παρόντʼ οὐχὶ φέροι. μαινομένων But cleverness is not wisdom, nor is thinking on things unfit for mortals. Life is short, and on this account the one who pursues great things does not achieve that which is present. In my opinion


οἵδε τρόποι καὶthese are the ways of mad and ill-advised men. Choru


κακοβούλων παρʼ ἔμοιγε φωτῶν. Χορόςthese are the ways of mad and ill-advised men. Choru


ἱκοίμαν ποτὶ ΚύπρονWould that I could go to Cyprus , the island of Aphrodite, where the Loves, who soothe


νᾶσον τᾶς ἈφροδίταςWould that I could go to Cyprus , the island of Aphrodite, where the Loves, who soothe


ἵνʼ οἱ θελξίφρονες νέμονται Would that I could go to Cyprus , the island of Aphrodite, where the Loves, who soothe


θνατοῖσιν Ἔρωτεςmortals’ hearts, dwell, and to Paphos , fertilized without rain by the streams of a foreign river flowing with a hundred mouths. Lead me there, Bromius, Bromius, god of joy who leads the Bacchae


Πάφον θʼ ἃν ἑκατόστομοιmortals’ hearts, dwell, and to Paphos , fertilized without rain by the streams of a foreign river flowing with a hundred mouths. Lead me there, Bromius, Bromius, god of joy who leads the Bacchae


βαρβάρου ποταμοῦ ῥοαὶmortals’ hearts, dwell, and to Paphos , fertilized without rain by the streams of a foreign river flowing with a hundred mouths. Lead me there, Bromius, Bromius, god of joy who leads the Bacchae


καρπίζουσιν ἄνομβροι.mortals’ hearts, dwell, and to Paphos , fertilized without rain by the streams of a foreign river flowing with a hundred mouths. Lead me there, Bromius, Bromius, god of joy who leads the Bacchae


οὗ δʼ ἁ καλλιστευομέναmortals’ hearts, dwell, and to Paphos , fertilized without rain by the streams of a foreign river flowing with a hundred mouths. Lead me there, Bromius, Bromius, god of joy who leads the Bacchae


Πιερία μούσειος ἕδραto Pieria , beautiful seat of the Muses, the holy slope of Olympus . There are the Graces, there is Desire; there it i


σεμνὰ κλιτὺς Ὀλύμπουto Pieria , beautiful seat of the Muses, the holy slope of Olympus . There are the Graces, there is Desire; there it i


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

41 results
1. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 146 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

146. q rend= 146. q type=
2. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 24-26, 280-283, 237 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

237. οὐ προστρόπαιον οὐδʼ ἀφοίβαντον χέρα
3. Aristophanes, Birds, 988, 987 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

987. καὶ φείδου μηδὲν μηδ' αἰετοῦ ἐν νεφέλῃσιν
4. Aristophanes, Clouds, 603-606, 332 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

332. Θουριομάντεις ἰατροτέχνας σφραγιδονυχαργοκομήτας
5. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 991, 990 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

990. εὔιον ὦ Διόνυσε
6. Aristophanes, Wasps, 874 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

874. ἰήιε Παιάν.
7. Euripides, Bacchae, 10, 1016, 1020, 1031, 1037, 11, 115, 1150-1153, 120-125, 1250, 126-133, 1338-1339, 134, 140, 157, 170-199, 2, 200-299, 3, 300-328, 330-369, 375, 395-399, 4, 400-402, 412-413, 446, 5, 526, 528-529, 536, 546, 566, 579, 582, 592, 6, 629, 641-656, 66-68, 7, 726, 777, 790, 8, 84, 862, 87, 876-880, 882-899, 9, 90, 900-901, 903-909, 91, 910-912, 92-93, 976, 992-996, 998, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. ἥκω Διὸς παῖς τήνδε Θηβαίων χθόνα 1. I, the son of Zeus, have come to this land of the Thebans—Dionysus, whom once Semele, Kadmos’ daughter, bore, delivered by a lightning-bearing flame. And having taken a mortal form instead of a god’s
8. Euripides, Cretes (Fragmenta Papyracea), 472 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Cyclops, 123, 620, 63, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. ̓͂Ω Βρόμιε, διὰ σὲ μυρίους ἔχω πόνους
10. Euripides, Electra, 1025-1029, 1032, 1035, 390, 1024 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Euripides, Hecuba, 1115, 1187-1191, 254-257, 1114 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Helen, 1227-1228, 132, 1365, 138, 160-161, 73, 118 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

118. ὥσπερ γε σέ, οὐδὲν ἧσσον, ὀφθαλμοῖς ὁρῶ. 118. I saw her with my own eyes, just as I see you, no less. Helen
13. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 682 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Euripides, Hippolytus, 487, 79-80, 486 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

486. ’Tis even this, too plausible a tongue, that overthrows good governments and homes of men. We should not speak to please the ear but point the path that leads to noble fame. Nurse
15. Euripides, Ion, 714-720, 216 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 1244, 1243 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17. Euripides, Medea, 113-114, 144-145, 160-167, 214-266, 271-276, 282-303, 580, 583, 112 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. Euripides, Orestes, 908, 907 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

19. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 227-228, 649, 785, 226 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

20. Euripides, Rhesus, 973, 972 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

972. As under far Pangaion Orpheus lies
21. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 382-597, 381 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

381. (to a herald.) Forasmuch as with this thy art thou hast ever served the stat£ and me by carrying my proclamations far and wide, so now cross Asopus and the waters of Ismenus, and declare this message to the haughty king of the Cadmeans:
22. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

649d. and excessive audacity, and fearful of ever daring to say or suffer or do anything shameful. Clin. So it appears. Ath. And are not these the conditions in which we are of the character described,—anger, lust, insolence, ignorance, covetousness, and extravagance; and these also,—wealth, beauty, strength, and everything which intoxicates a man with pleasure and turns his head? And for the purpose, first, of providing a cheap and comparatively harmless test of these conditions, and, secondly, of affording practice in them, what more suitable pleasure can we mention than wine
23. Sophocles, Antigone, 1116-1154, 1115 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

24. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 891 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

25. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 154, 211, 300-304, 385-395, 1096 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

26. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 2.702 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2.702. καλὸν Ἰηπαιήονʼ Ἰηπαιήονα Φοῖβον
27. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 12.10.3-12.10.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12.10.3.  And shortly thereafter the city was moved to another site and received another name, its founders being Lampon and Xenocritus; the circumstances of its founding were as follows. The Sybarites who were driven a second time from their native city dispatched ambassadors to Greece, to the Lacedaemonians and Athenians, requesting that they assist their repatriation and take part in the settlement. 12.10.4.  Now the Lacedaemonians paid no attention to them, but the Athenians promised to join in the enterprise, and they manned ten ships and sent them to the Sybarites under the leadership of Lampon and Xenocritus; they further sent word to the several cities of the Peloponnesus, offering a share in the colony to anyone who wished to take part in it.
28. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 4.15 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

29. Arrian, Anabasis of Alexander, 6.28.2 (1st cent. CE

6.28.2. ὅτι καὶ ὑπὲρ ἐκείνου λόγος ἐλέγετο καταστρεψάμενον Ἰνδοὺς Διόνυσον οὕτω τὴν πολλὴν τῆς Ἀσίας ἐπελθεῖν, καὶ Θρίαμβόν τε αὐτὸν ἐπικληθῆναι τὸν Διόνυσον καὶ τὰς ἐπὶ ταῖς νίκαις ταῖς ἐκ πολέμου πομπὰς ἐπὶ τῷ αὐτῷ τούτῳ θριάμβους. ταῦτα δὲ οὔτε Πτολεμαῖος ὁ Λάγου οὔτε Ἀριστόβουλος ὁ Ἀριστοβούλου ἀνέγραψαν οὐδέ τις ἄλλος ὅντινα ἱκανὸν ἄν τις ποιήσαιτο τεκμηριῶσαι ὑπὲρ τῶν τοιῶνδε, καί μοι ὡς οὐ πιστὰ ἀναγεγράφθαι Aristob. fr. 36 ἐξήρκεσαν.
30. Cornutus, De Natura Deorum, 30 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

31. New Testament, Acts, 26.24-26.25 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

26.24. As he thus made his defense, Festus said with a loud voice, "Paul, you are crazy! Your great learning is driving you insane! 26.25. But he said, "I am not crazy, most excellent Festus, but boldly declare words of truth and reasonableness.
32. New Testament, John, 15.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15.1. I am the true vine, and my Father is the farmer.
33. New Testament, Matthew, 26.26-26.28 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

26.26. As they were eating, Jesus took bread, gave thanks for it, and broke it. He gave to the disciples, and said, "Take, eat; this is my body. 26.27. He took the cup, gave thanks, and gave to them, saying, "All of you drink it 26.28. for this is my blood of the new covet, which is poured out for many for the remission of sins.
34. Plutarch, Pericles, 6.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6.2. A story is told that once on a time the head of a one-horned ram was brought to Pericles from his country-place, and that Lampon the seer, when he saw how the horn grew strong and solid from the middle of the forehead, declared that, whereas there were two powerful parties in the city, that of Thucydides and that of Pericles, the mastery would finally devolve upon one man,—the man to whom this sign had been given. Anaxagoras, however, had the skull cut in two, and showed that the brain had not filled out its position, but had drawn together to a point, like an egg, at that particular spot in the entire cavity where the root of the horn began.
35. Plutarch, Themistocles, 13.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

36. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 12.119-12.120 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

37. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.40.6, 2.2.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.40.6. After the precinct of Zeus, when you have ascended the citadel, which even at the present day is called Caria from Car, son of Phoroneus, you see a temple of Dionysus Nyctelius (Nocturnal), a sanctuary built to Aphrodite Epistrophia (She who turns men to love), an oracle called that of Night and a temple of Zeus Conius (Dusty) without a roof. The image of Asclepius and also that of Health were made by Bryaxis. Here too is what is called the Chamber of Demeter, built, they say, by Car when he was king. 2.2.6. The things worthy of mention in the city include the extant remains of antiquity, but the greater number of them belong to the period of its second ascendancy. On the market-place, where most of the sanctuaries are, stand Artemis surnamed Ephesian and wooden images of Dionysus, which are covered with gold with the exception of their faces; these are ornamented with red paint. They are called Lysius and Baccheus
38. Porphyry, On Abstinence, 2.55 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

2.55. 55.This sacred institute was, however, abolished by Diphilus, the king of Cyprus, who flourished about the time of Seleucus, the theologist. But Daemon substituted an ox for a man; thus causing the latter sacrifice to be of equal worth with the former. Amosis also abolished the law of sacrificing men in the Egyptian city Heliopolis; the truth of which is testified by Manetho in his treatise on Antiquity and Piety. But the sacrifice was made to Juno, and an investigation took place, as if they were endeavouring to find pure calves, and such as were marked by the impression of a seal. Three men also were sacrificed on the day appointed for this purpose, in the place of whom Amosis ordered them to substitute three waxen images. In Chios likewise, they sacrificed a man to Omadius Bacchus 23, the man being for this purpose torn in pieces; and the same custom, as Eulpis Carystius says, was adopted in |77 Tenedos. To which may be added, that the Lacedaemonians, as Apollodorus says, sacrificed a man to Mars. SPAN
39. Stobaeus, Anthology, 4.23.8 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

40. Anon., Scholia Aristophanem Nubes, 332

41. Orphic Hymns., Hymni, 52.1



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
alcestis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
andromache Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
aphrodite Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 178
apollo, apollonian, apolline Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
apollo, dionysus, association with Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 157
apollo, sacking of delphi predicted in bacchae Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 157
apollo, teiresias in bacchae as prophet of Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 157
apollo Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
aristophanes Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
bacchus, bacchius Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 357
cadmus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 178, 180
characters, minor Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
charlatans Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
chios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
chorus (male, female), of e. bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47, 357
comedy Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
concepts/values/beliefs Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 167, 174, 178, 180
context/environment/milieu, socio-cultural, ideological Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
cry, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
cult-establishment/foundation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55, 167, 169, 174, 175, 178, 180
cyclops Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
dance, dancing Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
delphi, delphian, delphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
delphi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
dionyso(u)s Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
dionysos, awakening Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 357
dionysos, dionysos bacchios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos bromios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47, 357
dionysos, dionysos choragos/choreutas/philochoreutas Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos dithyrambos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47, 357
dionysos, dionysos eriboas Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos eribremetas Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos eribromos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos euios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos liberator Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos liknites Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos lyaios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos lyseus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos lysios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos nyktelios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos omadios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos omestes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, dionysos thriambos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
dionysos, epiphany Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 357
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47, 357; Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
dionysus, hellenization of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
dionysus, sōphrōn/sophos Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 169
divination Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
donysos manikos, mainoles, mainolios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
enlightenment, politics and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 146
euripides, bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 167, 169, 174, 178
euripides, exodos (missing part/lacuna) of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
euripides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
evohé εὐαί, εὐαἵ, εὐοἷ Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
festival, festivity, festive Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
figura etymologica Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 169
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
helen Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
hierarchy of means Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
hierocles Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
homer Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
hypotext Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 167
iacchos ἴακχος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
initiands/initiates/initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
jesus christ, and dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
jesus christ Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
justice (δίκη)/retribution (divine) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
kyriakou, p. xxii Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
lampon Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
language, rhetoric Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 146
liberation Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
liknon λίκνον Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
lloyd, michael Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
lycurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
lydia, lydian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 357
madness Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 357
magos Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
makarismos Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 175
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 357
mantinea Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
messengers/messenger-speech Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 167, 169
mystery Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
mystic initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
nicodemus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
night, nocturnal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
nyktelia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
oedipus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
omophagia ὠμοφαγία Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
orpheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
osullivan, p. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
parnassus, parnassian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
parnassus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
paul st. Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
pentheus, death Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 357
pentheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 357; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 167, 169, 174, 178
pericles Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
philia (friendship) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55, 180
physis Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 167
plague Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
plato, gorgias Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
plutarch Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
polis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 357
procession Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
prodicus Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 162
prophet Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
reception, of concepts and ideas Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 167, 169, 174, 175, 178, 180
reconciliation/convergence, in eumenides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
reconciliation/convergence, of apollo and dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
reconciliation/convergence, of dionysus and lycurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
redemption Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
refiguration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
replacement/substitution of names Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 169, 174, 175
resemblances, eumenides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
resemblances, neaniskoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
resemblances, reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 167, 169, 174, 175, 178, 180
resemblances Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175, 180
rhetoric Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587; Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 146
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
seaford, richard Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 157
segal, c. p. Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144, 162
semele Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 157; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
skin, animal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
socrates Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
sophia, wisdom ambivalence of Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 146
sophia, wisdom in bacchae Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 157
sophia/sophos (wisdom) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 167, 178, 180
sophia and philia Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
sophism of teiresias in bacchae Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144, 146
sparagmos/dismemberment Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 169
sunesis Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 146
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
suppliant women bacchae compared Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
sōphrosynē/sōphrōn Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 167, 169, 178
taplin, oliver Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
teiresias Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55, 167, 169, 174, 178, 180
thebes Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55, 180
theologos (iohannes) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
theotokos (mother of god), and the chorus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
theotokos (mother of god) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
thrace Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
thriambos θρίαμβος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
thyrsus θύρσος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
tragedy, tragic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 357
tragedy Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
variations Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 167, 169, 174
wine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 357
worship' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 47
xxii, dramatis personae (characters) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
zeus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 357; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174