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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5614
Euripides, Bacchae, 312-313


φρονεῖν δόκει τι· τὸν θεὸν δʼ ἐς γῆν δέχουdo not boast that sovereignty has power among men, nor, even if you think so, and your mind is diseased, believe that you are being at all wise. Receive the god into your land, pour libations to him, celebrate the Bacchic rites, and garland your head.Dionysus will not compel women


καὶ σπένδε καὶ βάκχευε καὶ στέφου κάρα.do not boast that sovereignty has power among men, nor, even if you think so, and your mind is diseased, believe that you are being at all wise. Receive the god into your land, pour libations to him, celebrate the Bacchic rites, and garland your head.Dionysus will not compel women


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

29 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.129-6.140 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.129. /until this day, but now hast thou come forth far in advance of all in thy hardihood, in that thou abidest my far-shadowing spear. Unhappy are they whose children face my might. But and if thou art one of the immortals come down from heaven, then will I not fight with the heavenly gods. 6.130. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.131. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.132. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.133. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.134. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.135. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.136. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.137. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.138. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.139. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.140. /and he lived not for long, seeing that he was hated of all the immortal gods. So would not I be minded to fight against the blessed gods. But if thou art of men, who eat the fruit of the field, draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. Then spake to him the glorious son of Hippolochus:
2. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 168-183, 218-223, 167 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

167. οὐδʼ ὅστις πάροιθεν ἦν μέγας 167. Not — whosoever was the great of yore
3. Aeschylus, Persians, 821-830, 820 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

820. ὡς οὐχ ὑπέρφευ θνητὸν ὄντα χρὴ φρονεῖν. 820. that mortal man should not vaunt himself excessively. For presumptuous pride, when it has matured, bears as its fruit a crop of calamity, from which it reaps an abundant harvest of tears. Bear in mind that such are the penalties for deeds like these, and hold Athens and Hellas in your memory. Let no one of you
4. Aristophanes, Birds, 988, 987 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

987. καὶ φείδου μηδὲν μηδ' αἰετοῦ ἐν νεφέλῃσιν
5. Aristophanes, Clouds, 603-606, 332 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

332. Θουριομάντεις ἰατροτέχνας σφραγιδονυχαργοκομήτας
6. Euripides, Bacchae, 10, 105-107, 1079, 108-109, 11, 110-114, 1150-1152, 1170-1171, 1185-1187, 1212-1215, 1278, 1338-1339, 1344-1349, 1388-1391, 170-199, 2, 200-239, 24, 240-249, 25, 250-259, 26, 260-269, 27, 270-279, 28, 280-289, 29, 290-299, 3, 30, 300-309, 31, 310-311, 313-369, 389, 39, 390-392, 395-397, 4, 40, 48, 5, 543-545, 576-599, 6, 600-656, 664-671, 676-699, 7, 700-739, 74, 740-799, 8, 800-861, 877-881, 897-898, 9, 971-976, 992-996, 998-999, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. ἥκω Διὸς παῖς τήνδε Θηβαίων χθόνα 1. I, the son of Zeus, have come to this land of the Thebans—Dionysus, whom once Semele, Kadmos’ daughter, bore, delivered by a lightning-bearing flame. And having taken a mortal form instead of a god’s
7. Euripides, Cretes (Fragmenta Papyracea), 472 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Euripides, Electra, 1025-1029, 1032, 1035, 390, 1024 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Hecuba, 1115, 1114 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Euripides, Helen, 1227-1228, 132, 138, 160-161, 1666-1667, 73, 118 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

118. ὥσπερ γε σέ, οὐδὲν ἧσσον, ὀφθαλμοῖς ὁρῶ. 118. I saw her with my own eyes, just as I see you, no less. Helen
11. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1424-1430, 79-80, 1423 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Ion, 715-720, 714 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

714. Ho! ye peaks of Parnassu
13. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 1244, 1446-1457, 1243 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Euripides, Medea, 113-114, 144-145, 160-167, 214-266, 271-276, 282-303, 112 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 227-228, 226 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 382-597, 381 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

381. (to a herald.) Forasmuch as with this thy art thou hast ever served the stat£ and me by carrying my proclamations far and wide, so now cross Asopus and the waters of Ismenus, and declare this message to the haughty king of the Cadmeans:
17. Sophocles, Antigone, 1127-1130, 1126 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 891 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

19. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 301-304, 385-395, 300 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

20. Septuagint, 3 Maccabees, 2.3-2.4, 6.9, 6.15, 6.18-6.21, 6.28 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

2.3. For you, the creator of all things and the governor of all, are a just Ruler, and you judge those who have done anything in insolence and arrogance. 2.3. In order that he might not appear to be an enemy to all, he inscribed below: "But if any of them prefer to join those who have been initiated into the mysteries, they shall have equal citizenship with the Alexandrians. 2.4. You destroyed those who in the past committed injustice, among whom were even giants who trusted in their strength and boldness, whom you destroyed by bringing upon them a boundless flood. 6.9. And now, you who hate insolence, all-merciful and protector of all, reveal yourself quickly to those of the nation of Israel -- who are being outrageously treated by the abominable and lawless Gentiles. 6.15. Let it be shown to all the Gentiles that you are with us, O Lord, and have not turned your face from us; but just as you have said, `Not even when they were in the land of their enemies did I neglect them,' so accomplish it, O Lord. 6.18. Then the most glorious, almighty, and true God revealed his holy face and opened the heavenly gates, from which two glorious angels of fearful aspect descended, visible to all but the Jews. 6.19. They opposed the forces of the enemy and filled them with confusion and terror, binding them with immovable shackles. 6.21. The beasts turned back upon the armed forces following them and began trampling and destroying them. 6.28. Release the sons of the almighty and living God of heaven, who from the time of our ancestors until now has granted an unimpeded and notable stability to our government.
21. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 12.10.3-12.10.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12.10.3.  And shortly thereafter the city was moved to another site and received another name, its founders being Lampon and Xenocritus; the circumstances of its founding were as follows. The Sybarites who were driven a second time from their native city dispatched ambassadors to Greece, to the Lacedaemonians and Athenians, requesting that they assist their repatriation and take part in the settlement. 12.10.4.  Now the Lacedaemonians paid no attention to them, but the Athenians promised to join in the enterprise, and they manned ten ships and sent them to the Sybarites under the leadership of Lampon and Xenocritus; they further sent word to the several cities of the Peloponnesus, offering a share in the colony to anyone who wished to take part in it.
22. New Testament, John, 1.14, 3.31, 11.27, 15.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.14. The Word became flesh, and lived among us. We saw his glory, such glory as of the one and only Son of the Father, full of grace and truth. 3.31. He who comes from above is above all. He who is from the Earth belongs to the Earth, and speaks of the Earth. He who comes from heaven is above all. 11.27. She said to him, "Yes, Lord. I have come to believe that you are the Christ, God's Son, he who comes into the world. 15.1. I am the true vine, and my Father is the farmer.
23. New Testament, Matthew, 26.26-26.28 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

26.26. As they were eating, Jesus took bread, gave thanks for it, and broke it. He gave to the disciples, and said, "Take, eat; this is my body. 26.27. He took the cup, gave thanks, and gave to them, saying, "All of you drink it 26.28. for this is my blood of the new covet, which is poured out for many for the remission of sins.
24. Plutarch, Demetrius, 10.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

25. Plutarch, Pericles, 6.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6.2. A story is told that once on a time the head of a one-horned ram was brought to Pericles from his country-place, and that Lampon the seer, when he saw how the horn grew strong and solid from the middle of the forehead, declared that, whereas there were two powerful parties in the city, that of Thucydides and that of Pericles, the mastery would finally devolve upon one man,—the man to whom this sign had been given. Anaxagoras, however, had the skull cut in two, and showed that the brain had not filled out its position, but had drawn together to a point, like an egg, at that particular spot in the entire cavity where the root of the horn began.
26. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 12.119-12.120 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

27. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.25.6-1.25.8, 1.38.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.25.6. On the death of Antipater Olympias came over from Epeirus, killed Aridaeus, and for a time occupied the throne; but shortly afterwards she was besieged by Cassander, taken and delivered up to the people. of the acts of Cassander when he came to the throne my narrative will deal only with such as concern the Athenians. He seized the fort of Panactum in Attica and also Salamis, and established as tyrant in Athens Demetrius the son of Phanostratus, a man who had won a reputation for wisdom. This tyrant was put down by Demetrius the son of Antigonus, a young man of strong Greek sympathies. 1.25.7. But Cassander, inspired by a deep hatred of the Athenians, made a friend of Lachares, who up to now had been the popular champion, and induced him also to arrange a tyranny. We know no tyrant who proved so cruel to man and so impious to the gods. Although Demetrius the son of Antigonus was now at variance with the Athenian people, he notwithstanding deposed Lachares too from his tyranny, who, on the capture of the fortifications, escaped to Boeotia . Lachares took golden shields from the Acropolis, and stripped even the statue of Athena of its removable ornament; he was accordingly suspected of being a very wealthy man 1.25.8. and was murdered by some men of Coronea for the sake of this wealth. After freeing the Athenians from tyrants Demetrius the son of Antigonus did not restore the Peiraeus to them immediately after the flight of Lachares, but subsequently overcame them and brought a garrison even into the upper city, fortifying the place called the Museum. This is a hill right opposite the Acropolis within the old city boundaries, where legend says Musaeus used to sing, and, dying of old age, was buried. Afterwards a monument also was erected here to a Syrian. At the time to which I refer Demetrius fortified and held it. 1.38.8. When you have turned from Eleusis to Boeotia you come to the Plataean land, which borders on Attica . Formerly Eleutherae formed the boundary on the side towards Attica, but when it came over to the Athenians henceforth the boundary of Boeotia was Cithaeron. The reason why the people of Eleutherae came over was not because they were reduced by war, but because they desired to share Athenian citizenship and hated the Thebans. In this plain is a temple of Dionysus, from which the old wooden image was carried off to Athens . The image at Eleutherae at the present day is a copy of the old one.
28. Stobaeus, Anthology, 4.23.8 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

29. Anon., Scholia Aristophanem Nubes, 332



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acknowledge (believe in) gods Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 237
aeschylus, aeschylean (dionysiac) tetralogies/plays Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
aetiological myths/aetia Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111
agave Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 130
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
alcestis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
andromache Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
aphrodite Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 178
apollodorus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8
aristophanes Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
artemis Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111
athenian, tragedy Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 64
athenians Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 64
athens Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 64
cadmus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8, 92, 165, 178, 180
captivity/imprisonment/enslavement Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8
characters, minor Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
charlatans Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
christus patiens, a drama for reading Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
cithaeron Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
coining new words Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 237
comedy Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
concepts/values/beliefs Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111, 129, 167, 174, 178, 180
context/environment/milieu, socio-cultural, ideological Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 165, 174
crown, crowned Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460
cult-establishment/foundation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111, 165, 180
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8, 92, 111, 129, 165, 167, 174, 175, 178, 180
cults, mystery-cult Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 64
cults, new Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 64
cults, polis Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 64
cults Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 64
cyclops Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
dance, dancing, ecstatic, frenzied, maenadic, orgiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460
death associated with dionysos and dionysian cult or myth Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460
demeter Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 64
diodorus siculus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8
dionysism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460
dionyso(u)s Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
dionysos/dionysus Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 64
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460; Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
dionysus, and hēsychia Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111
dionysus, anthropomorphism of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
dionysus, effeminate/effeminacy of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8
dionysus, epiphanies/theophany of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8, 129
dionysus Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 237
divination Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
eros, bacchants, obsession of pentheus with sexual impropriety of Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 159
euripides, bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129, 165, 167, 174, 178
euripides, exodos (missing part/lacuna) of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
euripides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92, 129, 130, 180
evidence (of aeschylus dionysiac tetralogies), mythographic Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8
festival, festivity, festive Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460
hades place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460
hallucination/delusion Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
heaven, heavenly Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
helen Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
hierarchy of means Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
hierocles Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
homer Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111
homeric hymns, to dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
hosios (and cognates), in context of rituals of worship Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 237
hubris Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111
hypotext Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 167
hēsychia/calm life/quietism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111, 129
initiands/initiates/initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 165, 174
initiation Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 237
jerusalem Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 165
jesus christ, and dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 165, 175
jesus christ Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 130, 165, 175
jews, jewish Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460
justice (δίκη)/retribution (divine) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
kadmos, kadmeian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460
kyriakou, p. xxii Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
lampon Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
libation Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460
liberation Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460
lloyd, michael Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
lycurgus, and pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92, 111
lycurgus, myth of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8
lydia, xanthus of Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 64
madness (mania)/frenzy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
maenads/maenadism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129
magos Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
makarismos Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 175
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
messengers/messenger-speech Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8, 111, 129, 167
mystery Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111, 165, 174
mystic initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
naevius lucurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8
nicodemus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
night, nocturnal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460
oedipus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
osullivan, p. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
papyrus-text Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
pattern (plot/thematic) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111
paul st. Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
pentheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92, 111, 129, 165, 167, 174, 178
pericles Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
philia (friendship) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8, 180
phronēsis Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111
physis Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129, 167
plague Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
plato, gorgias Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
plutarch Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
polis, cohesion/coherence of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92, 111
polis Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 165
prologue/expository opening, of christus patiens Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 130
prophet Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
ptolemy iv philopator Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460
punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460
reception, of concepts and ideas Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 167, 174, 175, 178, 180
reception, of dramatic conventions Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129, 130
reception, of dramatic situations and themes Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 165
reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
reconciliation/convergence, of apollo and dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
reconciliation/convergence, of dionysus and lycurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8, 92
reconfiguration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 130
reconstruction, of naevius lucurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8
recontextualization Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
redemption Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
refiguration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92, 111, 130, 165, 180
rejuvenation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
replacement/substitution of names Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 130, 174, 175
resemblances, divergences/variations Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111
resemblances, edonoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8, 92
resemblances, lycurgeia Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
resemblances, myth and dramatic action Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8
resemblances, neaniskoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
resemblances, reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129, 130, 165, 167, 174, 175, 178, 180
resemblances Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92, 175, 180
reworking Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
rhetoric Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460
sacred and profane meaning of hosios Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 237
segal, c. p. Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
semele Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 165, 180
socrates Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
sophia/sophos (wisdom) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111, 129, 167, 178, 180
sophia and philia Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
sophism of teiresias in bacchae Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
sparagmos/dismemberment Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
suppliant women bacchae compared Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
susanetti, davide Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 159
symposium Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460
sōphrosynē/sōphrōn Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111, 129, 167, 178
taplin, oliver Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
teiresias Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460; Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8, 92, 167, 174, 178, 180
the paphlagonians), king magistrate Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 64
thebes Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 165, 180
theologos (iohannes) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 129, 180
theomachos (–oi)/theomachia/theomachein Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92, 165
theotokos (mother of god), and the chorus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
theotokos (mother of god) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 165, 175
thrace Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
thyrsos (–oi) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
timai (of gods) Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 237
tragedy Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
transformation, of tragic material Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 130
tyranny, theagenes Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 64
variations Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 130, 165, 167, 174
wine' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460
women in greek culture greek misogyny and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 159
xxii, dramatis personae (characters) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
yahweh Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 460
zeus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174