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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5614
Euripides, Bacchae, 290-297


Ἥρα νιν ἤθελʼ ἐκβαλεῖν ἀπʼ οὐρανοῦ·Hera wished to banish him from the sky, but Zeus, as a god, had a counter-contrivance. Having broken a part of the air which surrounds the earth, he gave this to Hera as a pledge protecting the real A line of text has apparently been lost here. Dionysus from her hostility. But in time


Ζεὺς δʼ ἀντεμηχανήσαθʼ οἷα δὴ θεός.Hera wished to banish him from the sky, but Zeus, as a god, had a counter-contrivance. Having broken a part of the air which surrounds the earth, he gave this to Hera as a pledge protecting the real A line of text has apparently been lost here. Dionysus from her hostility. But in time


ῥήξας μέρος τι τοῦ χθόνʼ ἐγκυκλουμένουHera wished to banish him from the sky, but Zeus, as a god, had a counter-contrivance. Having broken a part of the air which surrounds the earth, he gave this to Hera as a pledge protecting the real A line of text has apparently been lost here. Dionysus from her hostility. But in time


αἰθέρος, ἔθηκε τόνδʼ ὅμηρον ἐκδιδούςHera wished to banish him from the sky, but Zeus, as a god, had a counter-contrivance. Having broken a part of the air which surrounds the earth, he gave this to Hera as a pledge protecting the real A line of text has apparently been lost here. Dionysus from her hostility. But in time


nanHera wished to banish him from the sky, but Zeus, as a god, had a counter-contrivance. Having broken a part of the air which surrounds the earth, he gave this to Hera as a pledge protecting the real A line of text has apparently been lost here. Dionysus from her hostility. But in time


Διόνυσον Ἥρας νεικέων· χρόνῳ δέ νινHera wished to banish him from the sky, but Zeus, as a god, had a counter-contrivance. Having broken a part of the air which surrounds the earth, he gave this to Hera as a pledge protecting the real A line of text has apparently been lost here. Dionysus from her hostility. But in time


βροτοὶ ῥαφῆναί φασιν ἐν μηρῷ Διόςmortals say that he was nourished in the thigh of Zeus, changing the word, because a god he had served as a hostage for the goddess Hera, and composing the story. The account given in lines 292f. of the development of this legend is based on the similarity between the Greek words for hostage ( ὅμηρος ) and thigh ( μηρός ). But this god is a prophet—for Bacchic revelry and madness have in them much prophetic skill.


ὄνομα μεταστήσαντες, ὅτι θεᾷ θεὸςmortals say that he was nourished in the thigh of Zeus, changing the word, because a god he had served as a hostage for the goddess Hera, and composing the story. The account given in lines 292f. of the development of this legend is based on the similarity between the Greek words for hostage ( ὅμηρος ) and thigh ( μηρός ). But this god is a prophet—for Bacchic revelry and madness have in them much prophetic skill.


Ἥρᾳ ποθʼ ὡμήρευσε, συνθέντες λόγον.mortals say that he was nourished in the thigh of Zeus, changing the word, because a god he had served as a hostage for the goddess Hera, and composing the story. The account given in lines 292f. of the development of this legend is based on the similarity between the Greek words for hostage ( ὅμηρος ) and thigh ( μηρός ). But this god is a prophet—for Bacchic revelry and madness have in them much prophetic skill.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

48 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 18.102 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

18.102. /hath he fallen, and had need of me to be a warder off of ruin. Now therefore, seeing I return not to my dear native land, neither proved anywise a light of deliverance to Patroclus nor to my other comrades, those many that have been slain by goodly Hector, but abide here by the ships. Profitless burden upon the earth—
2. Homer, Odyssey, 18.67-18.68, 19.450 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Pindar, Paeanes, 3.8-3.58 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 2.33-2.48 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Aristophanes, Birds, 988, 987 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

987. καὶ φείδου μηδὲν μηδ' αἰετοῦ ἐν νεφέλῃσιν
6. Aristophanes, Clouds, 300-313, 332, 603-606, 299 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Bacchae, 100-104, 11, 1170-1171, 1185-1187, 1212-1215, 1278, 1338-1339, 170-289, 291-369, 4, 485, 520-529, 608-609, 629-631, 641-656, 787-846, 88-99, 992-996, 10 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. αἰνῶ δὲ Κάδμον, ἄβατον ὃς πέδον τόδε 10. I praise Kadmos, who has made this place hallowed, the shrine of his daughter; and I have covered it all around with the cluster-bearing leaf of the vine.I have left the wealthy lands of the Lydians and Phrygians, the sun-parched plains of the Persians
8. Euripides, Cretes (Fragmenta Papyracea), 472 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Electra, 1025-1029, 1032, 1035, 1024 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Euripides, Hecuba, 1115, 841, 1114 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Euripides, Helen, 1227-1228, 132, 138, 160-161, 73, 118 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

118. ὥσπερ γε σέ, οὐδὲν ἧσσον, ὀφθαλμοῖς ὁρῶ. 118. I saw her with my own eyes, just as I see you, no less. Helen
12. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 531 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

531. Dearest of all mankind to me! Amphitryon
13. Euripides, Ion, 715-720, 714 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

714. Ho! ye peaks of Parnassu
14. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 1244, 1243 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Euripides, Medea, 113-114, 144-145, 160-167, 214-266, 271-276, 282-303, 112 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 227-228, 226 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 382-597, 381 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

381. (to a herald.) Forasmuch as with this thy art thou hast ever served the stat£ and me by carrying my proclamations far and wide, so now cross Asopus and the waters of Ismenus, and declare this message to the haughty king of the Cadmeans:
18. Euripides, Trojan Women, 884 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

884. O you that do support the earth and rest thereupon
19. Herodotus, Histories, 2.65, 2.139, 2.146, 3.122.2, 6.135, 8.65 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.65. but the Egyptians in this and in all other matters are exceedingly strict against desecration of their temples. ,Although Egypt has Libya on its borders, it is not a country of many animals. All of them are held sacred; some of these are part of men's households and some not; but if I were to say why they are left alone as sacred, I should end up talking of matters of divinity, which I am especially averse to treating; I have never touched upon such except where necessity has compelled me. ,But I will indicate how it is customary to deal with the animals. Men and women are appointed guardians to provide nourishment for each kind respectively; a son inherits this office from his father. ,Townsfolk in each place, when they pay their vows, pray to the god to whom the animal is dedicated, shaving all or one half or one third of their children's heads, and weighing the hair in a balance against a sum of silver; then the weight in silver of the hair is given to the female guardian of the creatures, who buys fish with it and feeds them. ,Thus, food is provided for them. Whoever kills one of these creatures intentionally is punished with death; if he kills accidentally, he pays whatever penalty the priests appoint. Whoever kills an ibis or a hawk, intentionally or not, must die for it. 2.139. Now the departure of the Ethiopian (they said) came about in this way. After seeing in a dream one who stood over him and urged him to gather together all the Priests in Egypt and cut them in half, he fled from the country. ,Seeing this vision, he said, he supposed it to be a manifestation sent to him by the gods, so that he might commit sacrilege and so be punished by gods or men; he would not (he said) do so, but otherwise, for the time foretold for his rule over Egypt was now fulfilled, after which he was to depart: ,for when he was still in Ethiopia, the oracles that are consulted by the people of that country told him that he was fated to reign fifty years over Egypt . Seeing that this time was now completed and that he was troubled by what he saw in his dream, Sabacos departed from Egypt of his own volition. 2.146. With regard to these two, Pan and Dionysus, one may follow whatever story one thinks most credible; but I give my own opinion concerning them here. Had Dionysus son of Semele and Pan son of Penelope appeared in Hellas and lived there to old age, like Heracles the son of Amphitryon, it might have been said that they too (like Heracles) were but men, named after the older Pan and Dionysus, the gods of antiquity; ,but as it is, the Greek story has it that no sooner was Dionysus born than Zeus sewed him up in his thigh and carried him away to Nysa in Ethiopia beyond Egypt ; and as for Pan, the Greeks do not know what became of him after his birth. It is therefore plain to me that the Greeks learned the names of these two gods later than the names of all the others, and trace the birth of both to the time when they gained the knowledge. 3.122.2. for Polycrates was the first of the Greeks whom we know to aim at the mastery of the sea, leaving out of account Minos of Cnossus and any others who before him may have ruled the sea; of what may be called the human race Polycrates was the first, and he had great hope of ruling Ionia and the Islands. 6.135. So Miltiades sailed back home in a sorry condition, neither bringing money for the Athenians nor having won Paros; he had besieged the town for twenty-six days and ravaged the island. ,The Parians learned that Timo the under-priestess of the goddesses had been Miltiades' guide and desired to punish her for this. Since they now had respite from the siege, they sent messengers to Delphi to ask if they should put the under-priestess to death for guiding their enemies to the capture of her native country, and for revealing to Miltiades the rites that no male should know. ,But the Pythian priestess forbade them, saying that Timo was not responsible: Miltiades was doomed to make a bad end, and an apparition had led him in these evils. 8.65. Dicaeus son of Theocydes, an Athenian exile who had become important among the Medes, said that at the time when the land of Attica was being laid waste by Xerxes' army and there were no Athenians in the country, he was with Demaratus the Lacedaemonian on the Thriasian plain and saw advancing from Eleusis a cloud of dust as if raised by the feet of about thirty thousand men. They marvelled at what men might be raising such a cloud of dust and immediately heard a cry. The cry seemed to be the “Iacchus” of the mysteries, ,and when Demaratus, ignorant of the rites of Eleusis, asked him what was making this sound, Dicaeus said, “Demaratus, there is no way that some great disaster will not befall the king's army. Since Attica is deserted, it is obvious that this voice is divine and comes from Eleusis to help the Athenians and their allies. ,If it descends upon the Peloponnese, the king himself and his army on the mainland will be endangered. If, however, it turns towards the ships at Salamis, the king will be in danger of losing his fleet. ,Every year the Athenians observe this festival for the Mother and the Maiden, and any Athenian or other Hellene who wishes is initiated. The voice which you hear is the ‘Iacchus’ they cry at this festival.” To this Demaratus replied, “Keep silent and tell this to no one else. ,If these words of yours are reported to the king, you will lose your head, and neither I nor any other man will be able to save you, so be silent. The gods will see to the army.” ,Thus he advised, and after the dust and the cry came a cloud, which rose aloft and floated away towards Salamis to the camp of the Hellenes. In this way they understood that Xerxes' fleet was going to be destroyed. Dicaeus son of Theocydes used to say this, appealing to Demaratus and others as witnesses.
20. Plato, Cratylus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

396d. Hermogenes. Indeed, Socrates, you do seem to me to be uttering oracles, exactly like an inspired prophet. Socrates. Yes, Hermogenes, and I am convinced that the inspiration came to me from Euthyphro the Prospaltian. For I was with him and listening to him a long time early this morning. So he must have been inspired, and he not only filled my ears but took possession of my soul with his superhuman wisdom. So I think this is our duty:
21. Plato, Euthyphro, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3c. Socrates. My dear Euthyphro, their ridicule is perhaps of no consequence. For the Athenians, I fancy, are not much concerned, if they think a man is clever, provided he does not impart his clever notions to others; but when they think he makes others to be like himself
22. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

23. Plato, Protagoras, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

357d. whatever can it be, and what do you call it? Tell us. If on the spur of the moment we had replied, Ignorance, you would have laughed us to scorn: but now if you laugh at us you will be laughing at yourselves as well. For you have admitted that it is from defect of knowledge that men err, when they do err, in their choice of pleasures and pains—that is, in the choice of good and evil; and from defect not merely of knowledge but of the knowledge which you have now admitted also to be that of measurement. And surely you know well enough for yourselve
24. Sophocles, Antigone, 1127-1130, 1126 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

25. Sophocles, Electra, 1354 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

26. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 891 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

27. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 301-304, 385-395, 300 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

28. Xenophon, Hellenica, 2.4.20, 6.3.6 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.4.20. And Cleocritus, the herald of the initiated, i.e. in the Eleusinian mysteries. a man with a very fine voice, obtained silence and said: Fellow citizens, why do you drive us out of the city? why do you wish to kill us? For we never did you any harm, but we have shared with you in the most solemn rites and sacrifices and the most splendid festivals, we have been companions in the dance and schoolmates and comrades in arms, and we have braved many dangers with you both by land and by sea in defense of the 404 B.C. common safety and freedom of us both. 6.3.6. The right course, indeed, would have been for us not to take up arms against one another in the beginning, since the tradition is that the first strangers to whom Triptolemus, Triptolemus of Eleusis had, according to the legend, carried from Attica throughout Greece both the cult of Demeter and the knowledge of her art — agriculture. Heracles was the traditional ancestor of the Spartan kings (cp. III. iii.) while the Dioscuri, Castor and Pollux, were putative sons of Tyndareus of Sparta. our ancestor, revealed the mystic rites of Demeter and Core were Heracles, your state’s founder, and the Dioscuri, your citizens; and, further, that it was upon Peloponnesus that he first bestowed the seed of Demeter’s fruit. How, then, can it be right, 371 B.C. either that you should ever come to destroy the fruit of those very men from whom you received the seed, or that we should not desire those very men, to whom we gave the seed, to obtain the greatest possible abundance of food? But if it is indeed ordered of the gods that wars should come among men, then we ought to begin war as tardily as we can, and, when it has come, to bring it to an end as speedily as possible.
29. Cicero, On Divination, 1.116 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.116. Hic magna quaedam exoritur, neque ea naturalis, sed artificiosa somniorum Antiphontis interpretatio eodemque modo et oraculorum et vaticinationum sunt enim explanatores, ut grammatici poe+tarum . Nam ut aurum et argentum, aes, ferrum frustra natura divina genuisset, nisi eadem docuisset, quem ad modum ad eorum venas perveniretur, nec fruges terrae bacasve arborum cum utilitate ulla generi humano dedisset, nisi earum cultus et conditiones tradidisset, materiave quicquam iuvaret, nisi consectionis eius fabricam haberemus, sic cum omni utilitate, quam di hominibus dederunt, ars aliqua coniuncta est, per quam illa utilitas percipi possit. Item igitur somniis, vaticinationibus, oraclis, quod erant multa obscura, multa ambigua, explanationes adhibitae sunt interpretum. 1.116. At this point it is pertinent to mention Antiphons well-known theory of the interpretation of dreams. His view is that the interpreters of dreams depending upon technical skill and not upon inspiration. He has the same view as to the interpretation of oracles and of frenzied utterances; for they all have their interpreters, just as poets have their commentators. Now it is clear that divine nature would have done a vain thing if she had merely created iron, copper, silver, and gold and had not shown us how to reach the veins in which those metals lie; the gift of field crops and orchard fruits would have been useless to the human race without a knowledge of how to cultivate them and prepare them for food; and building material would be of no service without the carpenters art to convert it into lumber. So it is with everything that the gods have given for the advantage of mankind, there has been joined some art whereby that advantage may be turned to account. The same is true of dreams, prophecies, and oracles: since many of them were obscure and doubtful, resort was had to the skill of professional interpreters.
30. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 12.10.3-12.10.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12.10.3.  And shortly thereafter the city was moved to another site and received another name, its founders being Lampon and Xenocritus; the circumstances of its founding were as follows. The Sybarites who were driven a second time from their native city dispatched ambassadors to Greece, to the Lacedaemonians and Athenians, requesting that they assist their repatriation and take part in the settlement. 12.10.4.  Now the Lacedaemonians paid no attention to them, but the Athenians promised to join in the enterprise, and they manned ten ships and sent them to the Sybarites under the leadership of Lampon and Xenocritus; they further sent word to the several cities of the Peloponnesus, offering a share in the colony to anyone who wished to take part in it.
31. Hyginus, Fabulae (Genealogiae), 167 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

32. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 3.256-3.315 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

33. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 3.4.2-3.4.3, 3.10.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.4.2. Κάδμος δὲ ἀνθʼ ὧν ἔκτεινεν ἀίδιον 3 -- ἐνιαυτὸν ἐθήτευσεν Ἄρει· ἦν δὲ ὁ ἐνιαυτὸς τότε ὀκτὼ ἔτη. μετὰ δὲ τὴν θητείαν Ἀθηνᾶ αὐτῷ τὴν βασιλείαν 4 -- κατεσκεύασε, Ζεὺς δὲ ἔδωκεν αὐτῷ γυναῖκα Ἁρμονίαν, Ἀφροδίτης καὶ Ἄρεος θυγατέρα. καὶ πάντες θεοὶ καταλιπόντες τὸν οὐρανόν, ἐν τῇ Καδμείᾳ τὸν γάμον εὐωχούμενοι καθύμνησαν. ἔδωκε δὲ αὐτῇ Κάδμος πέπλον καὶ τὸν ἡφαιστότευκτον ὅρμον, ὃν ὑπὸ Ἡφαίστου λέγουσί τινες δοθῆναι Κάδμῳ, Φερεκύδης δὲ ὑπὸ Εὐρώπης· ὃν παρὰ Διὸς αὐτὴν λαβεῖν. γίνονται δὲ Κάδμῳ θυγατέρες μὲν Αὐτονόη Ἰνὼ Σεμέλη Ἀγαυή, παῖς δὲ Πολύδωρος. Ἰνὼ μὲν οὖν Ἀθάμας ἔγημεν, Αὐτονόην δὲ Ἀρισταῖος, Ἀγαυὴν δὲ Ἐχίων. 3.4.3. Σεμέλης δὲ Ζεὺς ἐρασθεὶς Ἥρας κρύφα συνευνάζεται. ἡ δὲ ἐξαπατηθεῖσα ὑπὸ Ἥρας, κατανεύσαντος αὐτῇ Διὸς πᾶν τὸ αἰτηθὲν ποιήσειν, αἰτεῖται τοιοῦτον αὐτὸν ἐλθεῖν οἷος ἦλθε μνηστευόμενος Ἥραν. Ζεὺς δὲ μὴ δυνάμενος ἀνανεῦσαι παραγίνεται εἰς τὸν θάλαμον αὐτῆς ἐφʼ ἅρματος ἀστραπαῖς ὁμοῦ καὶ βρονταῖς, καὶ κεραυνὸν ἵησιν. Σεμέλης δὲ διὰ τὸν φόβον ἐκλιπούσης, ἑξαμηνιαῖον τὸ βρέφος ἐξαμβλωθὲν ἐκ τοῦ πυρὸς ἁρπάσας ἐνέρραψε τῷ μηρῷ. ἀποθανούσης δὲ Σεμέλης, αἱ λοιπαὶ Κάδμου θυγατέρες διήνεγκαν λόγον, συνηυνῆσθαι θνητῷ τινι Σεμέλην καὶ καταψεύσασθαι Διός, καὶ ὅτι 1 -- διὰ τοῦτο ἐκεραυνώθη. κατὰ δὲ τὸν χρόνον τὸν καθήκοντα Διόνυσον γεννᾷ Ζεὺς λύσας τὰ ῥάμματα, καὶ δίδωσιν Ἑρμῇ. ὁ δὲ κομίζει πρὸς Ἰνὼ καὶ Ἀθάμαντα καὶ πείθει τρέφειν ὡς κόρην. ἀγανακτήσασα δὲ Ἥρα μανίαν αὐτοῖς ἐνέβαλε, καὶ Ἀθάμας μὲν τὸν πρεσβύτερον παῖδα Λέαρχον ὡς ἔλαφον θηρεύσας ἀπέκτεινεν, Ἰνὼ δὲ τὸν Μελικέρτην εἰς πεπυρωμένον λέβητα ῥίψασα, εἶτα βαστάσασα μετὰ νεκροῦ τοῦ παιδὸς ἥλατο κατὰ βυθοῦ. 1 -- καὶ Λευκοθέα μὲν αὐτὴν καλεῖται, Παλαίμων δὲ ὁ παῖς, οὕτως ὀνομασθέντες ὑπὸ τῶν πλεόντων· τοῖς χειμαζομένοις γὰρ βοηθοῦσιν. ἐτέθη δὲ ἐπὶ Μελικέρτῃ ὁ 2 -- ἀγὼν τῶν Ἰσθμίων, Σισύφου θέντος. Διόνυσον δὲ Ζεὺς εἰς ἔριφον ἀλλάξας τὸν Ἥρας θυμὸν ἔκλεψε, καὶ λαβὼν αὐτὸν Ἑρμῆς πρὸς νύμφας ἐκόμισεν ἐν Νύσῃ κατοικούσας τῆς Ἀσίας, ἃς ὕστερον Ζεὺς καταστερίσας ὠνόμασεν Ὑάδας. 3.10.3. Ταϋγέτη δὲ ἐκ Διὸς ἐγέννησε 1 -- Λακεδαίμονα, ἀφʼ οὗ καὶ Λακεδαίμων ἡ χώρα καλεῖται. Λακεδαίμονος δὲ καὶ Σπάρτης τῆς Εὐρώτα, ὃς ἦν ἀπὸ Λέλεγος αὐτόχθονος καὶ νύμφης νηίδος Κλεοχαρείας, Ἀμύκλας καὶ Εὐρυδίκη, ἣν ἔγημεν Ἀκρίσιος. Ἀμύκλα δὲ καὶ Διομήδης τῆς Λαπίθου Κυνόρτης καὶ Ὑάκινθος. τοῦτον εἶναι τοῦ Ἀπόλλωνος ἐρώμενον λέγουσιν, ὃν δίσκῳ βαλὼν ἄκων ἀπέκτεινε. Κυνόρτου δὲ Περιήρης, ὃς γαμεῖ Γοργοφόνην τὴν Περσέως, καθάπερ Στησίχορός φησι, καὶ τίκτει Τυνδάρεων Ἰκάριον Ἀφαρέα Λεύκιππον. Ἀφαρέως μὲν οὖν καὶ Ἀρήνης τῆς Οἰβάλου 1 -- Λυγκεύς τε καὶ Ἴδας καὶ Πεῖσος· κατὰ πολλοὺς δὲ Ἴδας ἐκ Ποσειδῶνος λέγεται. Λυγκεὺς δὲ ὀξυδερκίᾳ διήνεγκεν, ὡς καὶ τὰ ὑπὸ γῆν θεωρεῖν. Λευκίππου δὲ θυγατέρες ἐγένοντο Ἱλάειρα καὶ Φοίβη· ταύτας ἁρπάσαντες ἔγημαν Διόσκουροι. πρὸς δὲ ταύταις Ἀρσινόην ἐγέννησε. ταύτῃ μίγνυται Ἀπόλλων, ἡ δὲ Ἀσκληπιὸν γεννᾷ. τινὲς δὲ Ἀσκληπιὸν οὐκ ἐξ Ἀρσινόης τῆς Λευκίππου λέγουσιν, ἀλλʼ ἐκ Κορωνίδος τῆς Φλεγύου ἐν Θεσσαλίᾳ. καί φασιν ἐρασθῆναι ταύτης Ἀπόλλωνα καὶ εὐθέως συνελθεῖν· τὴν δὲ 1 -- παρὰ τὴν τοῦ πατρὸς γνώμην ἑλομένην 2 -- Ἴσχυϊ τῷ Καινέως ἀδελφῷ συνοικεῖν. Ἀπόλλων δὲ τὸν μὲν ἀπαγγείλαντα κόρακα καταρᾶται, ὃν 3 -- τέως λευκὸν ὄντα ἐποίησε μέλανα, αὐτὴν δὲ ἀπέκτεινε. καιομένης δὲ αὐτῆς 4 -- ἁρπάσας τὸ βρέφος ἐκ τῆς πυρᾶς πρὸς Χείρωνα τὸν Κένταυρον ἤνεγκε, παρʼ ᾧ 1 -- καὶ τὴν ἰατρικὴν καὶ τὴν κυνηγετικὴν τρεφόμενος ἐδιδάχθη. καὶ γενόμενος χειρουργικὸς καὶ τὴν τέχνην ἀσκήσας ἐπὶ πολὺ οὐ μόνον ἐκώλυέ τινας ἀποθνήσκειν, ἀλλʼ ἀνήγειρε καὶ τοὺς ἀποθανόντας· παρὰ γὰρ Ἀθηνᾶς λαβὼν τὸ ἐκ τῶν φλεβῶν τῆς Γοργόνος ῥυὲν αἷμα, τῷ μὲν ἐκ τῶν ἀριστερῶν ῥυέντι πρὸς φθορὰν ἀνθρώπων ἐχρῆτο, τῷ δὲ ἐκ τῶν δεξιῶν πρὸς σωτηρίαν, καὶ διὰ τούτου 2 -- τοὺς τεθνηκότας ἀνήγειρεν. εὗρον 3 -- δέ τινας λεγομένους ἀναστῆναι ὑπʼ αὐτοῦ, Καπανέα καὶ Λυκοῦργον, ὡς Στησίχορός φησιν ἐν Ἐριφύλῃ, Ἱππόλυτον, ὡς ὁ τὰ Ναυπακτικὰ συγγράψας λέγει, Τυνδάρεων, ὥς φησι Πανύασις, 1 -- Ὑμέναιον, ὡς οἱ Ὀρφικοὶ λέγουσι, Γλαῦκον τὸν Μίνωος, ὡς Μελησαγόρας λέγε ι.
34. New Testament, John, 15.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15.1. I am the true vine, and my Father is the farmer.
35. New Testament, Matthew, 26.26-26.28 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

26.26. As they were eating, Jesus took bread, gave thanks for it, and broke it. He gave to the disciples, and said, "Take, eat; this is my body. 26.27. He took the cup, gave thanks, and gave to them, saying, "All of you drink it 26.28. for this is my blood of the new covet, which is poured out for many for the remission of sins.
36. Plutarch, Fragments, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

37. Plutarch, Fragments, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

38. Plutarch, Pericles, 6.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6.2. A story is told that once on a time the head of a one-horned ram was brought to Pericles from his country-place, and that Lampon the seer, when he saw how the horn grew strong and solid from the middle of the forehead, declared that, whereas there were two powerful parties in the city, that of Thucydides and that of Pericles, the mastery would finally devolve upon one man,—the man to whom this sign had been given. Anaxagoras, however, had the skull cut in two, and showed that the brain had not filled out its position, but had drawn together to a point, like an egg, at that particular spot in the entire cavity where the root of the horn began.
39. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 41.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

40. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 12.119-12.120 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

41. Lucian, A True Story, 2.20 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

42. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.26.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.26.7. The third account is, in my opinion, the farthest from the truth; it makes Asclepius to be the son of Arsinoe, the daughter of Leucippus. For when Apollophanes the Arcadian, came to Delphi and asked the god if Asclepius was the son of Arsinoe and therefore a Messenian, the Pythian priestess gave this response:— 0 Asclepius, born to bestow great joy upon mortals, Pledge of the mutual love I enjoyed with Phlegyas' daughter, Lovely Coronis, who bare thee in rugged land Epidaurus . Unknown . This oracle makes it quite certain that Asclepius was not a son of Arsinoe, and that the story was a fiction invented by Hesiod, or by one of Hesiod's interpolators, just to please the Messenians.
43. Sextus, Against The Mathematicians, 9.56 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

44. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 2.40, 9.55 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2.40. The affidavit in the case, which is still preserved, says Favorinus, in the Metroon, ran as follows: This indictment and affidavit is sworn by Meletus, the son of Meletus of Pitthos, against Socrates, the son of Sophroniscus of Alopece: Socrates is guilty of refusing to recognize the gods recognized by the state, and of introducing other new divinities. He is also guilty of corrupting the youth. The penalty demanded is death. The philosopher then, after Lysias had written a defence for him, read it through and said: A fine speech, Lysias; it is not, however, suitable to me. For it was plainly more forensic than philosophical. 9.55. The works of his which survive are these:The Art of Controversy.of Wrestling.On Mathematics.of the State.of Ambition.of Virtues.of the Ancient Order of Things.On the Dwellers in Hades.of the Misdeeds of Mankind.A Book of Precepts.of Forensic Speech for a Fee, two books of opposing arguments.This is the list of his works. Moreover there is a dialogue which Plato wrote upon him.Philochorus says that, when he was on a voyage to Sicily, his ship went down, and that Euripides hints at this in his Ixion. According to some his death occurred, when he was on a journey, at nearly ninety years of age
45. Firmicus Maternus Julius., De Errore Profanarum Religionum, 6.5 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

46. Anon., Scholia Aristophanem Nubes, 332

47. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 327, 325

48. Papyri, Derveni Papyrus, 3.7, 4.4-4.5, 5.6-5.10, 6.7-6.8, 6.10, 20.2



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adonis (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
aeschylus, aeschylean (dionysiac) tetralogies/plays Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
aeschylus Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
aethêr Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 985
aetiology Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 380
agave Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
air Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86
aither, zeus identified with Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 152
alcestis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
allegoresis (allegorical interpretation), in the derveni papyrus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86, 134
allegoresis (allegorical interpretation) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 134
anderson, ralph Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
andromache Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
anger Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 268
antiphon Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 86
aphrodite Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 178
apollodorus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8
argolid Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 268
aristophanes Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86; Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
aristotle Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
asclepius de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
athena Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 152
athens Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 134
atthidography Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 51
authority, competition for authority Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86
authority, of the da Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86
bacchae Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 378, 380
bacchants, bacchae, bacchai Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343
bendis (goddess) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
billings, j. xviii Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 378, 380
biography, homeric Repath and Whitmarsh, Reading Heliodorus' Aethiopica (2022) 96
boreas (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
boreas and oreithyia Hawes, Rationalizing Myth in Antiquity (2014) 15
cadmus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8, 92, 178, 180
cakes (offerings) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
captivity/imprisonment/enslavement Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8
characters, minor Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
characters Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 378, 985
charicleia Repath and Whitmarsh, Reading Heliodorus' Aethiopica (2022) 96
charlatans Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
chiron de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343
clients, of the da Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 86
comedy Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
concepts/values/beliefs Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 178, 180
context/environment/milieu, socio-cultural, ideological Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
cosmology Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
cult, change/continuity over time Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343
cult-establishment/foundation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8, 92, 174, 175, 178, 180
cyclops Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
death associated with dionysos and dionysian cult or myth Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343
demeter Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 86
derveni author Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 86, 134
derveni papyrus, first columns Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
derveni poem Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86, 134
diodorus siculus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8
dionyso(u)s Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 378, 380, 925, 985
dionysos, awakening Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343
dionysos, birth Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 268
dionysos, epiphany Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343
dionysos, immortal Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 268
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343; Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 268
dionysus, anthropomorphism of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
dionysus, birth de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
dionysus, birth of Hawes, Rationalizing Myth in Antiquity (2014) 14, 15
dionysus, birth of dionysus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86
dionysus, effeminate/effeminacy of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8
dionysus, epiphanies/theophany of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8
dionysus, heart de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
dionysus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86
diosphos, painter of Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343
dismemberment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343
divination Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
diviners Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 86, 134
dream Repath and Whitmarsh, Reading Heliodorus' Aethiopica (2022) 96
dreams, interpretation of oracular dreams Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
earth Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 86; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
earthquake Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343
ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
erinyes Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
eschatology Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 134
etymology Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86
eumenides Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
euripides, bacchae Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 178
euripides, exodos (missing part/lacuna) of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
euripides Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 86, 134; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92, 180
evidence (of aeschylus dionysiac tetralogies), mythographic Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8
experts, expertise, derveni author as expert Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 86, 134
expiation Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
fire Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
floating gap Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 51
fowler, robert, xxiii, xxiv, xxvi, xxvii, xxviii Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 51
gaia Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86
garland, robert Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
gestation Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 268
gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 86, 134
gods and goddesses, naming and identifying Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
gods and goddesses, new deities Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
gods as elements, names of the gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 134
hades, terrors of hades Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
hallucination/delusion Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
hearing (in the mysteries) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 134
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
helen Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
hera, angry Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 268
hera Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 985; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
hestia Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86
hierarchy of means Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
hierocles Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
hippocratic authors Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86
homer Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
homeric hymn to dionysos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 268
homeric hymns, to dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
immortalisation Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 268
initiands/initiates/initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
initiate Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343
initiates Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 134; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
isis (goddess and cult) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
isokrates, areopagitikos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
jacoby, felix Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 51
jealousy Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 268
jesus christ, and dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
jesus christ Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
justice (δίκη)/retribution (divine) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
kadmos, kadmeian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343
kleos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 268
kyriakou, p. xxii Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
lampon Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86; Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
libations Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
liberation Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343
life de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
lightning de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
lightning strike Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 268
linguistic ambiguity Hawes, Rationalizing Myth in Antiquity (2014) 14
lloyd, michael Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
lycurgus, and pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
lycurgus, myth of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8
madness (mania)/frenzy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343
magos Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
makarismos Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 175
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
medicine Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 134
men (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
messengers/messenger-speech Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8
musaeus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
mystery Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
mystery cults Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86
mystic initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
myth de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
naevius lucurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8
nicodemus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
nurse de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
nymph de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
nysa de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
odysseus Repath and Whitmarsh, Reading Heliodorus' Aethiopica (2022) 96
oedipus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
offerings (bloodless) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 134
officiants (in the mysteries) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 134
olympus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
oracles Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 134
oreithyia Hawes, Rationalizing Myth in Antiquity (2014) 15
orpheus, literary author de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
orpheus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
orphic, see titans, zagreus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
orphic doctrines Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 134
orphic poems Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 134
orphic rites Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 134
orphic tradition, derveni papyrus Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
orphic tradition Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
osiris (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
osullivan, p. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
pan (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
papyri/papyrology, derveni papyrus Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
papyrus-text Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
parker, robert c. t. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
paul st. Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
pelliccia, hayden Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 152
pentheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92, 174, 178
pericles Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
philia (friendship) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8, 180
philocorus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86
philosophy (ancient greek) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 985
plague Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
plato, gorgias Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
plato, myth criticism in Hawes, Rationalizing Myth in Antiquity (2014) 15
plato Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 86, 134
plutarch Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 134; Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
poetry de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
polis, cohesion/coherence of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
porphyry Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
pre-socratic philosophy Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 134
pregnancy Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 268
private initiators Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 134
prodicus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 985
professionals, of the sacred Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 134
prophet Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
protagoras Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
rationalization, and the divine Hawes, Rationalizing Myth in Antiquity (2014) 14, 15
reception, of concepts and ideas Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 175, 178, 180
reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
reconciliation/convergence, of apollo and dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
reconciliation/convergence, of dionysus and lycurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8, 92
reconstruction, of naevius lucurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8
recontextualization Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
redemption Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
refiguration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92, 180
rejuvenation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
religion/theology, old vs. new Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
religious authority, sacred law/prescriptions Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
replacement/substitution of names Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 175
resemblances, edonoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8, 92
resemblances, lycurgeia Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
resemblances, myth and dramatic action Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8
resemblances, neaniskoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
resemblances, reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 175, 178, 180
resemblances Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92, 175, 180
revenge Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 268
reworking Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
rhetoric Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
riddles Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 134
rites, rituals Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 86, 134
sabazios (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
sacrifice (thysia), rules and prescriptions Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
sacrifices Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 134
scodel, r. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 985
segal, c. p. Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
semele Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 268; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
sky Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86
socrates Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
sokrates Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
sophia/sophos (wisdom) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 178, 180
sophia and philia Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
sophism of teiresias in bacchae Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
sophists Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86
soul Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343
souls Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
spatium historicum Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 51
spatium mythicum Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 51
speech de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
stoicism Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 86
subterfuge Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 268
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
suppliant women bacchae compared Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
sōphrosynē/sōphrōn Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 178
taplin, oliver Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
teiresias Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 8, 92, 174, 178, 180
theagenes Repath and Whitmarsh, Reading Heliodorus' Aethiopica (2022) 96
thebes Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
theogony Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
theologos (iohannes) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
theology Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 134
theomachos (–oi)/theomachia/theomachein Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
theotokos (mother of god), and the chorus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
theotokos (mother of god) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
thigh Repath and Whitmarsh, Reading Heliodorus' Aethiopica (2022) 96
thrace Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
thunder, thunderbolt Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343
thyrsos (–oi) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
tiresias (in euripides bacchae) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 86, 134
torch, torchlight Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343
tragedy, rationalization in Hawes, Rationalizing Myth in Antiquity (2014) 14, 15
tragedy, tragic' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343
tragedy Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
truth Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 134
tynnichos of chalkis Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 30
variations Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
wisdom (expertise) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
womb de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
xxii, dramatis personae (characters) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
zeus, fatherhood Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 268
zeus, zeus lightning de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
zeus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 343; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 378, 380, 985; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
zeus mind Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 134
ἱερά Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 134