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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5614
Euripides, Bacchae, 266-329


ὅταν λάβῃ τις τῶν λόγων ἀνὴρ σοφὸςWhenever a wise man takes a good occasion for his speech, it is not a great task to speak well. You have a rapid tongue as though you were sensible, but there is no sense in your words.


καλὰς ἀφορμάς, οὐ μέγʼ ἔργον εὖ λέγειν·Whenever a wise man takes a good occasion for his speech, it is not a great task to speak well. You have a rapid tongue as though you were sensible, but there is no sense in your words.


σὺ δʼ εὔτροχον μὲν γλῶσσαν ὡς φρονῶν ἔχειςWhenever a wise man takes a good occasion for his speech, it is not a great task to speak well. You have a rapid tongue as though you were sensible, but there is no sense in your words.


ἐν τοῖς λόγοισι δʼ οὐκ ἔνεισί σοι φρένες.Whenever a wise man takes a good occasion for his speech, it is not a great task to speak well. You have a rapid tongue as though you were sensible, but there is no sense in your words.


θράσει δὲ δυνατὸς καὶ λέγειν οἷός τʼ ἀνὴρA man powerful in his boldness, one capable of speaking well, becomes a bad citizen in his lack of sense. This new god, whom you ridicule, I am unable to express how great he will be throughout Hellas . For two things, young man


κακὸς πολίτης γίγνεται νοῦν οὐκ ἔχων.A man powerful in his boldness, one capable of speaking well, becomes a bad citizen in his lack of sense. This new god, whom you ridicule, I am unable to express how great he will be throughout Hellas . For two things, young man


nanA man powerful in his boldness, one capable of speaking well, becomes a bad citizen in his lack of sense. This new god, whom you ridicule, I am unable to express how great he will be throughout Hellas . For two things, young man


οὐκ ἂν δυναίμην μέγεθος ἐξειπεῖν ὅσοςA man powerful in his boldness, one capable of speaking well, becomes a bad citizen in his lack of sense. This new god, whom you ridicule, I am unable to express how great he will be throughout Hellas . For two things, young man


καθʼ Ἑλλάδʼ ἔσται. δύο γάρ, ὦ νεανίαA man powerful in his boldness, one capable of speaking well, becomes a bad citizen in his lack of sense. This new god, whom you ridicule, I am unable to express how great he will be throughout Hellas . For two things, young man


τὰ πρῶτʼ ἐν ἀνθρώποισι· Δημήτηρ θεά—are first among men: the goddess Demeter—she is the earth, but call her whatever name you wish; she nourishes mortals with dry food; but he who came afterwards, the offspring of Semele, discovered a match to it, the liquid drink of the grape, and introduced it


γῆ δʼ ἐστίν, ὄνομα δʼ ὁπότερον βούλῃ κάλει·are first among men: the goddess Demeter—she is the earth, but call her whatever name you wish; she nourishes mortals with dry food; but he who came afterwards, the offspring of Semele, discovered a match to it, the liquid drink of the grape, and introduced it


αὕτη μὲν ἐν ξηροῖσιν ἐκτρέφει βροτούς·are first among men: the goddess Demeter—she is the earth, but call her whatever name you wish; she nourishes mortals with dry food; but he who came afterwards, the offspring of Semele, discovered a match to it, the liquid drink of the grape, and introduced it


ὃς δʼ ἦλθʼ ἔπειτʼ, ἀντίπαλον ὁ Σεμέλης γόνοςare first among men: the goddess Demeter—she is the earth, but call her whatever name you wish; she nourishes mortals with dry food; but he who came afterwards, the offspring of Semele, discovered a match to it, the liquid drink of the grape, and introduced it


βότρυος ὑγρὸν πῶμʼ ηὗρε κεἰσηνέγκατοare first among men: the goddess Demeter—she is the earth, but call her whatever name you wish; she nourishes mortals with dry food; but he who came afterwards, the offspring of Semele, discovered a match to it, the liquid drink of the grape, and introduced it


θνητοῖς, ὃ παύει τοὺς ταλαιπώρους βροτοὺςto mortals. It releases wretched mortals from grief, whenever they are filled with the stream of the vine, and gives them sleep, a means of forgetting their daily troubles, nor is there another cure for hardships. He who is a god is poured out in offerings to the gods


λύπης, ὅταν πλησθῶσιν ἀμπέλου ῥοῆςto mortals. It releases wretched mortals from grief, whenever they are filled with the stream of the vine, and gives them sleep, a means of forgetting their daily troubles, nor is there another cure for hardships. He who is a god is poured out in offerings to the gods


ὕπνον τε λήθην τῶν καθʼ ἡμέραν κακῶνto mortals. It releases wretched mortals from grief, whenever they are filled with the stream of the vine, and gives them sleep, a means of forgetting their daily troubles, nor is there another cure for hardships. He who is a god is poured out in offerings to the gods


δίδωσιν, οὐδʼ ἔστʼ ἄλλο φάρμακον πόνων.to mortals. It releases wretched mortals from grief, whenever they are filled with the stream of the vine, and gives them sleep, a means of forgetting their daily troubles, nor is there another cure for hardships. He who is a god is poured out in offerings to the gods


οὗτος θεοῖσι σπένδεται θεὸς γεγώςto mortals. It releases wretched mortals from grief, whenever they are filled with the stream of the vine, and gives them sleep, a means of forgetting their daily troubles, nor is there another cure for hardships. He who is a god is poured out in offerings to the gods


ὥστε διὰ τοῦτον τἀγάθʼ ἀνθρώπους ἔχειν.o that by his means men may have good things. And do you laugh at him, because he was sewn up in Zeus’ thigh? I will teach you that this is well: when Zeus snatched him out of the lighting-flame, and led the child as a god to Olympus


nano that by his means men may have good things. And do you laugh at him, because he was sewn up in Zeus’ thigh? I will teach you that this is well: when Zeus snatched him out of the lighting-flame, and led the child as a god to Olympus


μηρῷ; διδάξω σʼ ὡς καλῶς ἔχει τόδε.o that by his means men may have good things. And do you laugh at him, because he was sewn up in Zeus’ thigh? I will teach you that this is well: when Zeus snatched him out of the lighting-flame, and led the child as a god to Olympus


ἐπεί νιν ἥρπασʼ ἐκ πυρὸς κεραυνίουo that by his means men may have good things. And do you laugh at him, because he was sewn up in Zeus’ thigh? I will teach you that this is well: when Zeus snatched him out of the lighting-flame, and led the child as a god to Olympus


Ζεύς, ἐς δʼ Ὄλυμπον βρέφος ἀνήγαγεν θεόνo that by his means men may have good things. And do you laugh at him, because he was sewn up in Zeus’ thigh? I will teach you that this is well: when Zeus snatched him out of the lighting-flame, and led the child as a god to Olympus


Ἥρα νιν ἤθελʼ ἐκβαλεῖν ἀπʼ οὐρανοῦ·Hera wished to banish him from the sky, but Zeus, as a god, had a counter-contrivance. Having broken a part of the air which surrounds the earth, he gave this to Hera as a pledge protecting the real A line of text has apparently been lost here. Dionysus from her hostility. But in time


Ζεὺς δʼ ἀντεμηχανήσαθʼ οἷα δὴ θεός.Hera wished to banish him from the sky, but Zeus, as a god, had a counter-contrivance. Having broken a part of the air which surrounds the earth, he gave this to Hera as a pledge protecting the real A line of text has apparently been lost here. Dionysus from her hostility. But in time


ῥήξας μέρος τι τοῦ χθόνʼ ἐγκυκλουμένουHera wished to banish him from the sky, but Zeus, as a god, had a counter-contrivance. Having broken a part of the air which surrounds the earth, he gave this to Hera as a pledge protecting the real A line of text has apparently been lost here. Dionysus from her hostility. But in time


αἰθέρος, ἔθηκε τόνδʼ ὅμηρον ἐκδιδούςHera wished to banish him from the sky, but Zeus, as a god, had a counter-contrivance. Having broken a part of the air which surrounds the earth, he gave this to Hera as a pledge protecting the real A line of text has apparently been lost here. Dionysus from her hostility. But in time


nanHera wished to banish him from the sky, but Zeus, as a god, had a counter-contrivance. Having broken a part of the air which surrounds the earth, he gave this to Hera as a pledge protecting the real A line of text has apparently been lost here. Dionysus from her hostility. But in time


Διόνυσον Ἥρας νεικέων· χρόνῳ δέ νινHera wished to banish him from the sky, but Zeus, as a god, had a counter-contrivance. Having broken a part of the air which surrounds the earth, he gave this to Hera as a pledge protecting the real A line of text has apparently been lost here. Dionysus from her hostility. But in time


βροτοὶ ῥαφῆναί φασιν ἐν μηρῷ Διόςmortals say that he was nourished in the thigh of Zeus, changing the word, because a god he had served as a hostage for the goddess Hera, and composing the story. The account given in lines 292f. of the development of this legend is based on the similarity between the Greek words for hostage ( ὅμηρος ) and thigh ( μηρός ). But this god is a prophet—for Bacchic revelry and madness have in them much prophetic skill.


ὄνομα μεταστήσαντες, ὅτι θεᾷ θεὸςmortals say that he was nourished in the thigh of Zeus, changing the word, because a god he had served as a hostage for the goddess Hera, and composing the story. The account given in lines 292f. of the development of this legend is based on the similarity between the Greek words for hostage ( ὅμηρος ) and thigh ( μηρός ). But this god is a prophet—for Bacchic revelry and madness have in them much prophetic skill.


Ἥρᾳ ποθʼ ὡμήρευσε, συνθέντες λόγον.mortals say that he was nourished in the thigh of Zeus, changing the word, because a god he had served as a hostage for the goddess Hera, and composing the story. The account given in lines 292f. of the development of this legend is based on the similarity between the Greek words for hostage ( ὅμηρος ) and thigh ( μηρός ). But this god is a prophet—for Bacchic revelry and madness have in them much prophetic skill.


nanmortals say that he was nourished in the thigh of Zeus, changing the word, because a god he had served as a hostage for the goddess Hera, and composing the story. The account given in lines 292f. of the development of this legend is based on the similarity between the Greek words for hostage ( ὅμηρος ) and thigh ( μηρός ). But this god is a prophet—for Bacchic revelry and madness have in them much prophetic skill.


καὶ τὸ μανιῶδες μαντικὴν πολλὴν ἔχει·mortals say that he was nourished in the thigh of Zeus, changing the word, because a god he had served as a hostage for the goddess Hera, and composing the story. The account given in lines 292f. of the development of this legend is based on the similarity between the Greek words for hostage ( ὅμηρος ) and thigh ( μηρός ). But this god is a prophet—for Bacchic revelry and madness have in them much prophetic skill.


ὅταν γὰρ ὁ θεὸς ἐς τὸ σῶμʼ ἔλθῃ πολύςFor whenever the god enters a body in full force, he makes the frantic to foretell the future. He also possesses a share of Ares’ nature. For terror sometimes flutters an army under arms and in its ranks before it even touches a spear;


λέγειν τὸ μέλλον τοὺς μεμηνότας ποιεῖ.For whenever the god enters a body in full force, he makes the frantic to foretell the future. He also possesses a share of Ares’ nature. For terror sometimes flutters an army under arms and in its ranks before it even touches a spear;


Ἄρεώς τε μοῖραν μεταλαβὼν ἔχει τινά·For whenever the god enters a body in full force, he makes the frantic to foretell the future. He also possesses a share of Ares’ nature. For terror sometimes flutters an army under arms and in its ranks before it even touches a spear;


στρατὸν γὰρ ἐν ὅπλοις ὄντα κἀπὶ τάξεσινFor whenever the god enters a body in full force, he makes the frantic to foretell the future. He also possesses a share of Ares’ nature. For terror sometimes flutters an army under arms and in its ranks before it even touches a spear;


φόβος διεπτόησε πρὶν λόγχης θιγεῖν.For whenever the god enters a body in full force, he makes the frantic to foretell the future. He also possesses a share of Ares’ nature. For terror sometimes flutters an army under arms and in its ranks before it even touches a spear;


μανία δὲ καὶ τοῦτʼ ἐστὶ Διονύσου πάρα.and this too is a frenzy from Dionysus. You will see him also on the rocks of Delphi , bounding with torches through the highland of two peaks, leaping and shaking the Bacchic branch, mighty throughout Hellas . But believe me, Pentheus;


ἔτʼ αὐτὸν ὄψῃ κἀπὶ Δελφίσιν πέτραιςand this too is a frenzy from Dionysus. You will see him also on the rocks of Delphi , bounding with torches through the highland of two peaks, leaping and shaking the Bacchic branch, mighty throughout Hellas . But believe me, Pentheus;


πηδῶντα σὺν πεύκαισι δικόρυφον πλάκαand this too is a frenzy from Dionysus. You will see him also on the rocks of Delphi , bounding with torches through the highland of two peaks, leaping and shaking the Bacchic branch, mighty throughout Hellas . But believe me, Pentheus;


πάλλοντα καὶ σείοντα βακχεῖον κλάδονand this too is a frenzy from Dionysus. You will see him also on the rocks of Delphi , bounding with torches through the highland of two peaks, leaping and shaking the Bacchic branch, mighty throughout Hellas . But believe me, Pentheus;


μέγαν τʼ ἀνʼ Ἑλλάδα. ἀλλʼ ἐμοί, Πενθεῦ, πιθοῦ·and this too is a frenzy from Dionysus. You will see him also on the rocks of Delphi , bounding with torches through the highland of two peaks, leaping and shaking the Bacchic branch, mighty throughout Hellas . But believe me, Pentheus;


μὴ τὸ κράτος αὔχει δύναμιν ἀνθρώποις ἔχεινdo not boast that sovereignty has power among men, nor, even if you think so, and your mind is diseased, believe that you are being at all wise. Receive the god into your land, pour libations to him, celebrate the Bacchic rites, and garland your head.Dionysus will not compel women


μηδʼ, ἢν δοκῇς μέν, ἡ δὲ δόξα σου νοσῇdo not boast that sovereignty has power among men, nor, even if you think so, and your mind is diseased, believe that you are being at all wise. Receive the god into your land, pour libations to him, celebrate the Bacchic rites, and garland your head.Dionysus will not compel women


φρονεῖν δόκει τι· τὸν θεὸν δʼ ἐς γῆν δέχουdo not boast that sovereignty has power among men, nor, even if you think so, and your mind is diseased, believe that you are being at all wise. Receive the god into your land, pour libations to him, celebrate the Bacchic rites, and garland your head.Dionysus will not compel women


καὶ σπένδε καὶ βάκχευε καὶ στέφου κάρα.do not boast that sovereignty has power among men, nor, even if you think so, and your mind is diseased, believe that you are being at all wise. Receive the god into your land, pour libations to him, celebrate the Bacchic rites, and garland your head.Dionysus will not compel women


nando not boast that sovereignty has power among men, nor, even if you think so, and your mind is diseased, believe that you are being at all wise. Receive the god into your land, pour libations to him, celebrate the Bacchic rites, and garland your head.Dionysus will not compel women


γυναῖκας ἐς τὴν Κύπριν, ἀλλʼ ἐν τῇ φύσειto be modest in regard to Aphrodite, but in nature modesty dwells always you must look for that. For she who is modest will not be corrupted in Bacchic revelry. Do you see? You rejoice whenever many people are at your gates


τὸ σωφρονεῖν ἔνεστιν εἰς τὰ πάντʼ ἀείto be modest in regard to Aphrodite, but in nature modesty dwells always you must look for that. For she who is modest will not be corrupted in Bacchic revelry. Do you see? You rejoice whenever many people are at your gates


τοῦτο σκοπεῖν χρή· καὶ γὰρ ἐν βακχεύμασινto be modest in regard to Aphrodite, but in nature modesty dwells always you must look for that. For she who is modest will not be corrupted in Bacchic revelry. Do you see? You rejoice whenever many people are at your gates


οὖσʼ ἥ γε σώφρων οὐ διαφθαρήσεται.to be modest in regard to Aphrodite, but in nature modesty dwells always you must look for that. For she who is modest will not be corrupted in Bacchic revelry. Do you see? You rejoice whenever many people are at your gates


nanto be modest in regard to Aphrodite, but in nature modesty dwells always you must look for that. For she who is modest will not be corrupted in Bacchic revelry. Do you see? You rejoice whenever many people are at your gates


πολλοί, τὸ Πενθέως δʼ ὄνομα μεγαλύνῃ πόλις·and the city extols the name of Pentheus. He too, I think, delights in being honored. Kadmos, whom you mock, and I will crown our heads with ivy and dance, a gray yoke-team but still we must dance;


κἀκεῖνος, οἶμαι, τέρπεται τιμώμενος.and the city extols the name of Pentheus. He too, I think, delights in being honored. Kadmos, whom you mock, and I will crown our heads with ivy and dance, a gray yoke-team but still we must dance;


ἐγὼ μὲν οὖν καὶ Κάδμος, ὃν σὺ διαγελᾷςand the city extols the name of Pentheus. He too, I think, delights in being honored. Kadmos, whom you mock, and I will crown our heads with ivy and dance, a gray yoke-team but still we must dance;


κισσῷ τʼ ἐρεψόμεσθα καὶ χορεύσομενand the city extols the name of Pentheus. He too, I think, delights in being honored. Kadmos, whom you mock, and I will crown our heads with ivy and dance, a gray yoke-team but still we must dance;


πολιὰ ξυνωρίς, ἀλλʼ ὅμως χορευτέονand the city extols the name of Pentheus. He too, I think, delights in being honored. Kadmos, whom you mock, and I will crown our heads with ivy and dance, a gray yoke-team but still we must dance;


κοὐ θεομαχήσω σῶν λόγων πεισθεὶς ὕπο.and I will not be persuaded by your words to fight against the god. For you are mad in a most grievous way, and you will not be cured by drugs, nor are you sick without them. Chorus Leader


μαίνῃ γὰρ ὡς ἄλγιστα, κοὔτε φαρμάκοιςand I will not be persuaded by your words to fight against the god. For you are mad in a most grievous way, and you will not be cured by drugs, nor are you sick without them. Chorus Leader


ἄκη λάβοις ἂν οὔτʼ ἄνευ τούτων νοσεῖς. Χορόςand I will not be persuaded by your words to fight against the god. For you are mad in a most grievous way, and you will not be cured by drugs, nor are you sick without them. Chorus Leader


ὦ πρέσβυ, Φοῖβόν τʼ οὐ καταισχύνεις λόγοιςCHORUS: Old sir, thy words do not discredit Phoebus, and thou art wise in honouring Bromius, potent deity. CADMUS: My son, Teiresias hath given thee sound advice; dwell with us, but o'erstep not the threshold of custom; for now thou art soaring aloft, and thy wisdom is no wisdom. E'en though he be no god, as thou assertest, still say he is; be guilty of a splendid fraud, declaring him the son of Semele, that she may be thought the mother of a god, and we and all our race gain honour. Dost thou mark the awful fate of Actaeon? whom savage hounds of his own rearing rent in pieces in the meadows, because he boasted himself a better hunter than Artemis. Lest thy fate be the same, come let me crown thy head with ivy; join us in rendering homage to the god. PENTHEUS: Touch me not away to thy Bacchic rites thyself! never try to infect me with thy foolery! Vengeance will I have on the fellow who teaches thee such senselessness. Away one of you without delay! seek yonder seat where he observes his birds, wrench it from its base with levers, turn it upside down, o'erthrowing it in utter confusion, and toss his garlands to the tempest's blast. For by so doing shall I wound him most deeply. Others of you range the city and hunt down this girl-faced stranger, who is introducing a new complaint amongst our women, and doing outrage to the marriage tie. And if haply ye catch him, bring him hither to me in chains, to be stoned to death, a bitter ending to his revelry in Thebes. Exit PENTHEUS.


ὦ πρέσβυ, Φοῖβόν τʼ οὐ καταισχύνεις λόγοιςOld man, you do not shame Phoebus with your words, and honoring Dionysus, a great god, you are prudent. Kadmo


τιμῶν τε Βρόμιον σωφρονεῖς, μέγαν θεόν. ΚάδμοςOld man, you do not shame Phoebus with your words, and honoring Dionysus, a great god, you are prudent. Kadmo


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

22 results
1. Aristophanes, Birds, 988, 987 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

987. καὶ φείδου μηδὲν μηδ' αἰετοῦ ἐν νεφέλῃσιν
2. Aristophanes, Clouds, 332 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

332. Θουριομάντεις ἰατροτέχνας σφραγιδονυχαργοκομήτας
3. Euripides, Andromache, 184-191, 183 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Bacchae, 11, 1338-1339, 170-265, 267-369, 641-656, 992-996, 10 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. αἰνῶ δὲ Κάδμον, ἄβατον ὃς πέδον τόδε 10. I praise Kadmos, who has made this place hallowed, the shrine of his daughter; and I have covered it all around with the cluster-bearing leaf of the vine.I have left the wealthy lands of the Lydians and Phrygians, the sun-parched plains of the Persians
5. Euripides, Cretes (Fragmenta Papyracea), 472 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Euripides, Electra, 1025-1029, 1032, 1035, 1024 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Hecuba, 1115, 1187-1191, 254-257, 1114 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Euripides, Helen, 1227-1228, 132, 138, 160-161, 73, 118 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

118. ὥσπερ γε σέ, οὐδὲν ἧσσον, ὀφθαλμοῖς ὁρῶ. 118. I saw her with my own eyes, just as I see you, no less. Helen
9. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1039-1040, 486-489, 503, 986-991, 1038 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1038. A wizard or magician must the fellow be, to think he can first flout me, his father
10. Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 1116, 1115 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Euripides, Medea, 113-114, 144-145, 160-167, 214-266, 271-276, 282-303, 576-578, 580, 583, 112 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Orestes, 545-550, 907-908, 544 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

544. Old man, I am afraid to speak before you
13. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 382-597, 381 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

381. (to a herald.) Forasmuch as with this thy art thou hast ever served the stat£ and me by carrying my proclamations far and wide, so now cross Asopus and the waters of Ismenus, and declare this message to the haughty king of the Cadmeans:
14. Euripides, Trojan Women, 968, 967 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 891 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 301-304, 385-395, 300 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 12.10.3-12.10.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12.10.3.  And shortly thereafter the city was moved to another site and received another name, its founders being Lampon and Xenocritus; the circumstances of its founding were as follows. The Sybarites who were driven a second time from their native city dispatched ambassadors to Greece, to the Lacedaemonians and Athenians, requesting that they assist their repatriation and take part in the settlement. 12.10.4.  Now the Lacedaemonians paid no attention to them, but the Athenians promised to join in the enterprise, and they manned ten ships and sent them to the Sybarites under the leadership of Lampon and Xenocritus; they further sent word to the several cities of the Peloponnesus, offering a share in the colony to anyone who wished to take part in it.
18. New Testament, John, 15.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15.1. I am the true vine, and my Father is the farmer.
19. New Testament, Matthew, 26.26-26.28 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

26.26. As they were eating, Jesus took bread, gave thanks for it, and broke it. He gave to the disciples, and said, "Take, eat; this is my body. 26.27. He took the cup, gave thanks, and gave to them, saying, "All of you drink it 26.28. for this is my blood of the new covet, which is poured out for many for the remission of sins.
20. Plutarch, Pericles, 6.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6.2. A story is told that once on a time the head of a one-horned ram was brought to Pericles from his country-place, and that Lampon the seer, when he saw how the horn grew strong and solid from the middle of the forehead, declared that, whereas there were two powerful parties in the city, that of Thucydides and that of Pericles, the mastery would finally devolve upon one man,—the man to whom this sign had been given. Anaxagoras, however, had the skull cut in two, and showed that the brain had not filled out its position, but had drawn together to a point, like an egg, at that particular spot in the entire cavity where the root of the horn began.
21. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 12.119-12.120 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

22. Anon., Scholia Aristophanem Nubes, 332



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90
agôn/-es Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
alcestis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
alexandros Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90
andromache Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
antiope Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90
antiphon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90
aphrodite Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 178
apollo, teiresias in bacchae as prophet of Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 145
aristophanes Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
attic law Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90
cadmus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 178, 180
captatio benevolentiae Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90
characters, minor Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
charlatans Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
comedy Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
concepts/values/beliefs Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 178, 180
context/environment/milieu, socio-cultural, ideological Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
cult-establishment/foundation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 175, 178, 180
cyclops Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
dionyso(u)s Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
dionysos Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
divination Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
enlightenment, politics and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 145, 146
euripides, bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 178
euripides, exodos (missing part/lacuna) of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
euripides Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
gnômê Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
helen Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
hierarchy of means Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
hierocles Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
homer Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
initiands/initiates/initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
isocrates Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90
jesus christ, and dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
jesus christ Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
justice (δίκη)/retribution (divine) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
kyriakou, p. xxii Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
lampon Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
language, rhetoric Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 145, 146
lloyd, m. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90
lloyd, michael Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
magos Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
makarismos Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 175
mastronarde, d. j. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
mystery Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
mystic initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
nicodemus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
oedipus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
oratory Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90
osullivan, p. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
palamedes Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90
paul st. Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 178
pericles Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
philia (friendship) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
plague Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
plato, gorgias Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
plutarch Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
prophet Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
prothesis Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90
reception, of concepts and ideas Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 175, 178, 180
redemption Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
refiguration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
replacement/substitution of names Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 175
resemblances, reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 175, 178, 180
resemblances Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175, 180
rhetoric Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587; Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 145, 146
rhetorical aporia Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90
segal, c. p. Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
semele Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
slander Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90
socrates Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
sophia, wisdom ambivalence of Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 146
sophia/sophos (wisdom) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 178, 180
sophia and philia Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
sophism of teiresias in bacchae Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144, 146
speaker Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90
sunesis' Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 146
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 587
suppliant women bacchae compared Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
sōphrosynē/sōphrōn Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 178
taplin, oliver Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
teiresias Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 178, 180
thebes Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
theologos (iohannes) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
theotokos (mother of god), and the chorus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
theotokos (mother of god) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
topos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90
tragedy Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
trial–debate Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 90
variations Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
xxii, dramatis personae (characters) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
zeus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174