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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5614
Euripides, Bacchae, 170-351


τίς ἐν πύλαισι; Κάδμον ἐκκάλει δόμωνWho is at the gates? Call from the house Kadmos, son of Agenor, who leaving the city of Sidon built this towering city of the Thebans. Let someone go and announce that Teiresias is looking for him. He knows why I have come and


Ἀγήνορος παῖδʼ, ὃς πόλιν ΣιδωνίανWho is at the gates? Call from the house Kadmos, son of Agenor, who leaving the city of Sidon built this towering city of the Thebans. Let someone go and announce that Teiresias is looking for him. He knows why I have come and


λιπὼν ἐπύργωσʼ ἄστυ Θηβαίων τόδε.Who is at the gates? Call from the house Kadmos, son of Agenor, who leaving the city of Sidon built this towering city of the Thebans. Let someone go and announce that Teiresias is looking for him. He knows why I have come and


ἴτω τις, εἰσάγγελλε Τειρεσίας ὅτιWho is at the gates? Call from the house Kadmos, son of Agenor, who leaving the city of Sidon built this towering city of the Thebans. Let someone go and announce that Teiresias is looking for him. He knows why I have come and


ζητεῖ νιν· οἶδε δʼ αὐτὸς ὧν ἥκω πέριWho is at the gates? Call from the house Kadmos, son of Agenor, who leaving the city of Sidon built this towering city of the Thebans. Let someone go and announce that Teiresias is looking for him. He knows why I have come and


ἅ τε ξυνεθέμην πρέσβυς ὢν γεραιτέρῳwhat agreement I, an old man, have made with him, older still: to twine the thyrsoi, to wear fawn-skins, and to crown our heads with ivy branches. Kadmo


θύρσους ἀνάπτειν καὶ νεβρῶν δορὰς ἔχεινwhat agreement I, an old man, have made with him, older still: to twine the thyrsoi, to wear fawn-skins, and to crown our heads with ivy branches. Kadmo


στεφανοῦν τε κρᾶτα κισσίνοις βλαστήμασιν. Κάδμοςwhat agreement I, an old man, have made with him, older still: to twine the thyrsoi, to wear fawn-skins, and to crown our heads with ivy branches. Kadmo


ὦ φίλταθʼ, ὡς σὴν γῆρυν ᾐσθόμην κλύωνDearest friend, for inside the house I heard and recognized your wise voice, the voice of a wise man;


σοφὴν σοφοῦ παρʼ ἀνδρός, ἐν δόμοισιν ὤν·Dearest friend, for inside the house I heard and recognized your wise voice, the voice of a wise man;


ἥκω δʼ ἕτοιμος τήνδʼ ἔχων σκευὴν θεοῦ·I have come prepared with this equipment of the god. For we must extol him, the child of my daughter, Dionysus, who has appeared as a god to men as much as is in our power. Where must I dance, where set my feet


δεῖ γάρ νιν ὄντα παῖδα θυγατρὸς ἐξ ἐμῆςI have come prepared with this equipment of the god. For we must extol him, the child of my daughter, Dionysus, who has appeared as a god to men as much as is in our power. Where must I dance, where set my feet


Διόνυσον ὃς πέφηνεν ἀνθρώποις θεὸςI have come prepared with this equipment of the god. For we must extol him, the child of my daughter, Dionysus, who has appeared as a god to men as much as is in our power. Where must I dance, where set my feet


ὅσον καθʼ ἡμᾶς δυνατὸν αὔξεσθαι μέγαν.I have come prepared with this equipment of the god. For we must extol him, the child of my daughter, Dionysus, who has appeared as a god to men as much as is in our power. Where must I dance, where set my feet


ποῖ δεῖ χορεύειν, ποῖ καθιστάναι πόδαI have come prepared with this equipment of the god. For we must extol him, the child of my daughter, Dionysus, who has appeared as a god to men as much as is in our power. Where must I dance, where set my feet


καὶ κρᾶτα σεῖσαι πολιόν; ἐξηγοῦ σύ μοιand shake my grey head? Show me the way, Teiresias, one old man leading another; for you are wise. And so I shall never tire night or day striking the ground with the thyrsos. Gladly I have forgotten that I am old. Teiresia


γέρων γέροντι, Τειρεσία· σὺ γὰρ σοφός.and shake my grey head? Show me the way, Teiresias, one old man leading another; for you are wise. And so I shall never tire night or day striking the ground with the thyrsos. Gladly I have forgotten that I am old. Teiresia


ὡς οὐ κάμοιμʼ ἂν οὔτε νύκτʼ οὔθʼ ἡμέρανand shake my grey head? Show me the way, Teiresias, one old man leading another; for you are wise. And so I shall never tire night or day striking the ground with the thyrsos. Gladly I have forgotten that I am old. Teiresia


θύρσῳ κροτῶν γῆν· ἐπιλελήσμεθʼ ἡδέωςand shake my grey head? Show me the way, Teiresias, one old man leading another; for you are wise. And so I shall never tire night or day striking the ground with the thyrsos. Gladly I have forgotten that I am old. Teiresia


Τειρεσίαςand shake my grey head? Show me the way, Teiresias, one old man leading another; for you are wise. And so I shall never tire night or day striking the ground with the thyrsos. Gladly I have forgotten that I am old. Teiresia


part=and shake my grey head? Show me the way, Teiresias, one old man leading another; for you are wise. And so I shall never tire night or day striking the ground with the thyrsos. Gladly I have forgotten that I am old. Teiresia


κἀγὼ γὰρ ἡβῶ κἀπιχειρήσω χοροῖς. Κάδμοςfor I too feel young and will try to dance. Kadmo


οὐκοῦν ὄχοισιν εἰς ὄρος περάσομεν; ΤειρεσίαςThen will we go to the mountain in a chariot? Teiresia


ἀλλʼ οὐχ ὁμοίως ἂν ὁ θεὸς τιμὴν ἔχοι. ΚάδμοςBut then the god would not have equal honor. Kadmo


γέρων γέροντα παιδαγωγήσω σʼ ἐγώ. ΤειρεσίαςI, an old man, will lead you, an old man, like a pupil. Teiresia


ὁ θεὸς ἀμοχθὶ κεῖσε νῷν ἡγήσεται. ΚάδμοςThe god will lead us there without trouble. Kadmo


μόνοι δὲ πόλεως Βακχίῳ χορεύσομεν; ΤειρεσίαςCADMUS: Shall we alone of all the city dance in Bacchus' honour? TEIRESIAS: Yea, for we alone are wise, the rest are mad. CADMUS: We stay too long; come, take my hand. TEIRESIAS: There link thy hand in my firm grip. CADMUS: Mortal that I am, I scorn not the gods. TEIRESIAS: No subtleties do I indulge about the powers of heaven. The faith we inherited from our fathers, old as time itself, no reasoning shall cast down; no! though it were the subtlest invention of wits refined. Maybe some one will say, I have no respect for my grey hair in going to dance with ivy round my head; not so, for the god did not define whether old or young should dance, but from all alike he claims a universal homage, and scorns nice calculations in his worship. CADMUS: Teiresias, since thou art blind, I must prompt thee what to say. Pentheus is coming hither to the house in haste, Echion's son, to whom I resign the government. How scared he looks I what strange tidings will he tell? Enter PENTHEUS. PENTHEUS: I had left my kingdom for awhile, when tidings of strange mischief in this city reached me; I hear that our women-folk have left their homes on pretence of Bacchic rites, and on the wooded hills rush wildly to and fro, honouring in the dance this new god Dionysus, whoe'er he is; and in the midst of each revel-rout the brimming wine-bowl stands, and one by one they steal away to lonely spots to gratify their lust, pretending forsooth that they are Maenads bent on sacrifice, though it is Aphrodite they are placing before the Bacchic god. As many as I caught, my gaolers are keeping safe in the public prison fast bound; and all who are gone forth, will I chase from the hills, Ino and Agave too who bore me to Echion, and Actaeon's mother Autonoe. In fetters of iron will I bind them and soon put an end to these outrageous Bacchic rites. They say there came a stranger hither, a trickster and a sorcerer, from Lydia's land, with golden hair and perfumed locks, the flush of wine upon his face, and in his eyes each grace that Aphrodite gives; by day and night he lingers in our maidens' company on the plea of teaching Bacchic mysteries. Once let me catch him within these walls, and I will put an end to his thyrsus-beating and his waving of his tresses, for I will cut his head from his body. This is the fellow who says that Dionysus is a god, says that he was once stitched up in the thigh of Zeus-that child who with his mother was blasted by the lightning flash, because the woman falsely said her marriage was with Zeus. Is not this enough to deserve the awful penalty of hanging, this stranger's wanton insolence, whoe'er he be? But lo! another marvel. I see Teiresias, our diviner, dressed in dappled fawn-skins, and my mother's father too, wildly waving the Bacchic wand; droll sight enough! Father, it grieves me to see you two old men so void of sense. Oh! shake that ivy from thee! Let fall the thyrsus from thy hand, my mother's sire! Was it thou, Teiresias, urged him on to this? Art bent on introducing this fellow as another new deity amongst men, that thou mayst then observe the fowls of the air and make a gain from fiery divination? Were it not that thy grey hairs protected thee, thou shouldst sit in chains amid the Bacchanals, for introducing knavish mysteries; for where the gladsome grape is found at women's feasts, I deny that their rites have any longer good results.


μόνοι δὲ πόλεως Βακχίῳ χορεύσομεν; ΤειρεσίαςAre we the only ones in the city who will dance in Bacchus’ honor? Teiresia


μόνοι γὰρ εὖ φρονοῦμεν, οἱ δʼ ἄλλοι κακῶς. ΚάδμοςYes, for we alone think rightly, the rest wrongly. Kadmo


μακρὸν τὸ μέλλειν· ἀλλʼ ἐμῆς ἔχου χερός. ΤειρεσίαςThe delay is long; come, take hold of my hand. Teiresia


ἰδού, ξύναπτε καὶ ξυνωρίζου χέρα. ΚάδμοςHere, take hold, and join your hand with mine. Kadmo


οὐ καταφρονῶ ʼγὼ τῶν θεῶν θνητὸς γεγώς. ΤειρεσίαςHaving been born mortal I do not scorn the gods. Teiresia


οὐδὲν σοφιζόμεσθα τοῖσι δαίμοσιν.We mortals have no cleverness in the eyes of the the gods. Dodds admits that the text, as it appears in Murray, should be translated this way, but feels that the line should mean nor do we use cleverness on the gods or something similar. He argues for another reading that would allow this. Our ancestral traditions, and those which we have held throughout our lives, no argument will overturn, not even if some craftiness should be discovered by the depths of our wits. This translation, though literal, fudges on the meaning: ἀκραὶ φρένες must mean something like best or most subtle minds. Will anyone say that I do not respect old age


πατρίους παραδοχάς, ἅς θʼ ὁμήλικας χρόνῳWe mortals have no cleverness in the eyes of the the gods. Dodds admits that the text, as it appears in Murray, should be translated this way, but feels that the line should mean nor do we use cleverness on the gods or something similar. He argues for another reading that would allow this. Our ancestral traditions, and those which we have held throughout our lives, no argument will overturn, not even if some craftiness should be discovered by the depths of our wits. This translation, though literal, fudges on the meaning: ἀκραὶ φρένες must mean something like best or most subtle minds. Will anyone say that I do not respect old age


κεκτήμεθʼ, οὐδεὶς αὐτὰ καταβαλεῖ λόγοςWe mortals have no cleverness in the eyes of the the gods. Dodds admits that the text, as it appears in Murray, should be translated this way, but feels that the line should mean nor do we use cleverness on the gods or something similar. He argues for another reading that would allow this. Our ancestral traditions, and those which we have held throughout our lives, no argument will overturn, not even if some craftiness should be discovered by the depths of our wits. This translation, though literal, fudges on the meaning: ἀκραὶ φρένες must mean something like best or most subtle minds. Will anyone say that I do not respect old age


οὐδʼ εἰ διʼ ἄκρων τὸ σοφὸν ηὕρηται φρενῶν.We mortals have no cleverness in the eyes of the the gods. Dodds admits that the text, as it appears in Murray, should be translated this way, but feels that the line should mean nor do we use cleverness on the gods or something similar. He argues for another reading that would allow this. Our ancestral traditions, and those which we have held throughout our lives, no argument will overturn, not even if some craftiness should be discovered by the depths of our wits. This translation, though literal, fudges on the meaning: ἀκραὶ φρένες must mean something like best or most subtle minds. Will anyone say that I do not respect old age


ἐρεῖ τις ὡς τὸ γῆρας οὐκ αἰσχύνομαιWe mortals have no cleverness in the eyes of the the gods. Dodds admits that the text, as it appears in Murray, should be translated this way, but feels that the line should mean nor do we use cleverness on the gods or something similar. He argues for another reading that would allow this. Our ancestral traditions, and those which we have held throughout our lives, no argument will overturn, not even if some craftiness should be discovered by the depths of our wits. This translation, though literal, fudges on the meaning: ἀκραὶ φρένες must mean something like best or most subtle minds. Will anyone say that I do not respect old age


μέλλων χορεύειν κρᾶτα κισσώσας ἐμόν;being about to dance with my head covered in ivy? No, for the god has made no distinction as to whether it is right for men young or old to dance, but wishes to have common honors from all and to be extolled, setting no one apart. Kadmo


οὐ γὰρ διῄρηχʼ ὁ θεός, οὔτε τὸν νέονbeing about to dance with my head covered in ivy? No, for the god has made no distinction as to whether it is right for men young or old to dance, but wishes to have common honors from all and to be extolled, setting no one apart. Kadmo


εἰ χρὴ χορεύειν οὔτε τὸν γεραίτερονbeing about to dance with my head covered in ivy? No, for the god has made no distinction as to whether it is right for men young or old to dance, but wishes to have common honors from all and to be extolled, setting no one apart. Kadmo


ἀλλʼ ἐξ ἁπάντων βούλεται τιμὰς ἔχεινbeing about to dance with my head covered in ivy? No, for the god has made no distinction as to whether it is right for men young or old to dance, but wishes to have common honors from all and to be extolled, setting no one apart. Kadmo


κοινάς, διαριθμῶν δʼ οὐδένʼ αὔξεσθαι θέλει. Κάδμοςbeing about to dance with my head covered in ivy? No, for the god has made no distinction as to whether it is right for men young or old to dance, but wishes to have common honors from all and to be extolled, setting no one apart. Kadmo


ἐπεὶ σὺ φέγγος, Τειρεσία, τόδʼ οὐχ ὁρᾷςSince you do not see this light, Teiresias, I will be your interpreter. Pentheus, child of Echion, to whom I gave control of this land, is coming here to the house now in haste. How fluttered he is! What new matter will he tell us? Pentheu


ἐγὼ προφήτης σοι λόγων γενήσομαι.Since you do not see this light, Teiresias, I will be your interpreter. Pentheus, child of Echion, to whom I gave control of this land, is coming here to the house now in haste. How fluttered he is! What new matter will he tell us? Pentheu


Πενθεὺς πρὸς οἴκους ὅδε διὰ σπουδῆς περᾷSince you do not see this light, Teiresias, I will be your interpreter. Pentheus, child of Echion, to whom I gave control of this land, is coming here to the house now in haste. How fluttered he is! What new matter will he tell us? Pentheu


Ἐχίονος παῖς, ᾧ κράτος δίδωμι γῆς.Since you do not see this light, Teiresias, I will be your interpreter. Pentheus, child of Echion, to whom I gave control of this land, is coming here to the house now in haste. How fluttered he is! What new matter will he tell us? Pentheu


ὡς ἐπτόηται· τί ποτʼ ἐρεῖ νεώτερον; ΠενθεύςSince you do not see this light, Teiresias, I will be your interpreter. Pentheus, child of Echion, to whom I gave control of this land, is coming here to the house now in haste. How fluttered he is! What new matter will he tell us? Pentheu


ἔκδημος ὢν μὲν τῆσδʼ ἐτύγχανον χθονόςI happened to be at a distance from this land, when I heard of strange evils throughout this city, that the women have left our homes in contrived Bacchic rites, and rush about in the shadowy mountains, honoring with dance


κλύω δὲ νεοχμὰ τήνδʼ ἀνὰ πτόλιν κακάI happened to be at a distance from this land, when I heard of strange evils throughout this city, that the women have left our homes in contrived Bacchic rites, and rush about in the shadowy mountains, honoring with dance


γυναῖκας ἡμῖν δώματʼ ἐκλελοιπέναιI happened to be at a distance from this land, when I heard of strange evils throughout this city, that the women have left our homes in contrived Bacchic rites, and rush about in the shadowy mountains, honoring with dance


πλασταῖσι βακχείαισιν, ἐν δὲ δασκίοιςI happened to be at a distance from this land, when I heard of strange evils throughout this city, that the women have left our homes in contrived Bacchic rites, and rush about in the shadowy mountains, honoring with dance


ὄρεσι θοάζειν, τὸν νεωστὶ δαίμοναI happened to be at a distance from this land, when I heard of strange evils throughout this city, that the women have left our homes in contrived Bacchic rites, and rush about in the shadowy mountains, honoring with dance


Διόνυσον, ὅστις ἔστι, τιμώσας χοροῖς·this new deity Dionysus, whoever he is. I hear that mixing-bowls stand full in the midst of their assemblies, and that they each creep off different ways into secrecy to serve the beds of men, on the pretext that they are Maenads worshipping;


πλήρεις δὲ θιάσοις ἐν μέσοισιν ἑστάναιthis new deity Dionysus, whoever he is. I hear that mixing-bowls stand full in the midst of their assemblies, and that they each creep off different ways into secrecy to serve the beds of men, on the pretext that they are Maenads worshipping;


κρατῆρας, ἄλλην δʼ ἄλλοσʼ εἰς ἐρημίανthis new deity Dionysus, whoever he is. I hear that mixing-bowls stand full in the midst of their assemblies, and that they each creep off different ways into secrecy to serve the beds of men, on the pretext that they are Maenads worshipping;


πτώσσουσαν εὐναῖς ἀρσένων ὑπηρετεῖνthis new deity Dionysus, whoever he is. I hear that mixing-bowls stand full in the midst of their assemblies, and that they each creep off different ways into secrecy to serve the beds of men, on the pretext that they are Maenads worshipping;


πρόφασιν μὲν ὡς δὴ μαινάδας θυοσκόουςthis new deity Dionysus, whoever he is. I hear that mixing-bowls stand full in the midst of their assemblies, and that they each creep off different ways into secrecy to serve the beds of men, on the pretext that they are Maenads worshipping;


τὴν δʼ Ἀφροδίτην πρόσθʼ ἄγειν τοῦ Βακχίου.but they consider Aphrodite before Bacchus.As many of them as I have caught, servants keep in the public strongholds with their hands bound, and as many as are absent I will hunt from the mountains, I mean Ino and Agave, who bore me to Echion, and


nanbut they consider Aphrodite before Bacchus.As many of them as I have caught, servants keep in the public strongholds with their hands bound, and as many as are absent I will hunt from the mountains, I mean Ino and Agave, who bore me to Echion, and


σῴζουσι πανδήμοισι πρόσπολοι στέγαις·but they consider Aphrodite before Bacchus.As many of them as I have caught, servants keep in the public strongholds with their hands bound, and as many as are absent I will hunt from the mountains, I mean Ino and Agave, who bore me to Echion, and


ὅσαι δʼ ἄπεισιν, ἐξ ὄρους θηράσομαιbut they consider Aphrodite before Bacchus.As many of them as I have caught, servants keep in the public strongholds with their hands bound, and as many as are absent I will hunt from the mountains, I mean Ino and Agave, who bore me to Echion, and


Ἰνώ τʼ Ἀγαύην θʼ, ἥ μʼ ἔτικτʼ Ἐχίονιbut they consider Aphrodite before Bacchus.As many of them as I have caught, servants keep in the public strongholds with their hands bound, and as many as are absent I will hunt from the mountains, I mean Ino and Agave, who bore me to Echion, and


Ἀκταίονός τε μητέρʼ, Αὐτονόην λέγω.Autonoe, the mother of Actaeon. And having bound them in iron fetters, I will soon stop them from this ill-working revelry. And they say that some stranger has come, a sorcerer, a conjuror from the Lydian land


καὶ σφᾶς σιδηραῖς ἁρμόσας ἐν ἄρκυσινAutonoe, the mother of Actaeon. And having bound them in iron fetters, I will soon stop them from this ill-working revelry. And they say that some stranger has come, a sorcerer, a conjuror from the Lydian land


παύσω κακούργου τῆσδε βακχείας τάχα.Autonoe, the mother of Actaeon. And having bound them in iron fetters, I will soon stop them from this ill-working revelry. And they say that some stranger has come, a sorcerer, a conjuror from the Lydian land


nanAutonoe, the mother of Actaeon. And having bound them in iron fetters, I will soon stop them from this ill-working revelry. And they say that some stranger has come, a sorcerer, a conjuror from the Lydian land


γόης ἐπῳδὸς Λυδίας ἀπὸ χθονόςAutonoe, the mother of Actaeon. And having bound them in iron fetters, I will soon stop them from this ill-working revelry. And they say that some stranger has come, a sorcerer, a conjuror from the Lydian land


ξανθοῖσι βοστρύχοισιν εὐοσμῶν κόμηνfragrant in hair with golden curls, having in his eyes the wine-dark graces of Aphrodite. He is with the young girls day and night, alluring them with joyful mysteries. If I catch him within this house


οἰνῶπας ὄσσοις χάριτας Ἀφροδίτης ἔχωνfragrant in hair with golden curls, having in his eyes the wine-dark graces of Aphrodite. He is with the young girls day and night, alluring them with joyful mysteries. If I catch him within this house


ὃς ἡμέρας τε κεὐφρόνας συγγίγνεταιfragrant in hair with golden curls, having in his eyes the wine-dark graces of Aphrodite. He is with the young girls day and night, alluring them with joyful mysteries. If I catch him within this house


τελετὰς προτείνων εὐίους νεάνισιν.fragrant in hair with golden curls, having in his eyes the wine-dark graces of Aphrodite. He is with the young girls day and night, alluring them with joyful mysteries. If I catch him within this house


εἰ δʼ αὐτὸν εἴσω τῆσδε λήψομαι στέγηςfragrant in hair with golden curls, having in his eyes the wine-dark graces of Aphrodite. He is with the young girls day and night, alluring them with joyful mysteries. If I catch him within this house


παύσω κτυποῦντα θύρσον ἀνασείοντά τεI will stop him from making a noise with the thyrsos and shaking his hair, by cutting his head off.That one claims that Dionysus is a god, claims that he was once stitched into the thigh of Zeus—Dionysus, who was burnt up with his mother by the flame of lightning


κόμας, τράχηλον σώματος χωρὶς τεμών.I will stop him from making a noise with the thyrsos and shaking his hair, by cutting his head off.That one claims that Dionysus is a god, claims that he was once stitched into the thigh of Zeus—Dionysus, who was burnt up with his mother by the flame of lightning


nanI will stop him from making a noise with the thyrsos and shaking his hair, by cutting his head off.That one claims that Dionysus is a god, claims that he was once stitched into the thigh of Zeus—Dionysus, who was burnt up with his mother by the flame of lightning


ἐκεῖνος ἐν μηρῷ ποτʼ ἐρράφθαι ΔιόςI will stop him from making a noise with the thyrsos and shaking his hair, by cutting his head off.That one claims that Dionysus is a god, claims that he was once stitched into the thigh of Zeus—Dionysus, who was burnt up with his mother by the flame of lightning


ὃς ἐκπυροῦται λαμπάσιν κεραυνίαιςI will stop him from making a noise with the thyrsos and shaking his hair, by cutting his head off.That one claims that Dionysus is a god, claims that he was once stitched into the thigh of Zeus—Dionysus, who was burnt up with his mother by the flame of lightning


σὺν μητρί, Δίους ὅτι γάμους ἐψεύσατο.because she had falsely claimed a marriage with Zeus. Is this not worthy of a terrible death by hanging, for a stranger to insult me with these insults, whoever he is?But here is another wonder—I see Teiresias the soothsayer in dappled fawn-skin


ταῦτʼ οὐχὶ δεινῆς ἀγχόνης ἔστʼ ἄξιαbecause she had falsely claimed a marriage with Zeus. Is this not worthy of a terrible death by hanging, for a stranger to insult me with these insults, whoever he is?But here is another wonder—I see Teiresias the soothsayer in dappled fawn-skin


ὕβρεις ὑβρίζειν, ὅστις ἔστιν ὁ ξένος;because she had falsely claimed a marriage with Zeus. Is this not worthy of a terrible death by hanging, for a stranger to insult me with these insults, whoever he is?But here is another wonder—I see Teiresias the soothsayer in dappled fawn-skin


nanbecause she had falsely claimed a marriage with Zeus. Is this not worthy of a terrible death by hanging, for a stranger to insult me with these insults, whoever he is?But here is another wonder—I see Teiresias the soothsayer in dappled fawn-skin


ἐν ποικίλαισι νεβρίσι Τειρεσίαν ὁρῶbecause she had falsely claimed a marriage with Zeus. Is this not worthy of a terrible death by hanging, for a stranger to insult me with these insults, whoever he is?But here is another wonder—I see Teiresias the soothsayer in dappled fawn-skin


πατέρα τε μητρὸς τῆς ἐμῆσ—πολὺν γέλων—and my mother’s father—a great absurdity—raging about with a thyrsos. I shrink, father, from seeing your old age devoid of sense. Won’t you cast away the ivy? Grandfather, will you not free your hand of the thyrsos?


νάρθηκι βακχεύοντʼ· ἀναίνομαι, πάτερand my mother’s father—a great absurdity—raging about with a thyrsos. I shrink, father, from seeing your old age devoid of sense. Won’t you cast away the ivy? Grandfather, will you not free your hand of the thyrsos?


τὸ γῆρας ὑμῶν εἰσορῶν νοῦν οὐκ ἔχον.and my mother’s father—a great absurdity—raging about with a thyrsos. I shrink, father, from seeing your old age devoid of sense. Won’t you cast away the ivy? Grandfather, will you not free your hand of the thyrsos?


οὐκ ἀποτινάξεις κισσόν; οὐκ ἐλευθέρανand my mother’s father—a great absurdity—raging about with a thyrsos. I shrink, father, from seeing your old age devoid of sense. Won’t you cast away the ivy? Grandfather, will you not free your hand of the thyrsos?


θύρσου μεθήσεις χεῖρʼ, ἐμῆς μητρὸς πάτερ;and my mother’s father—a great absurdity—raging about with a thyrsos. I shrink, father, from seeing your old age devoid of sense. Won’t you cast away the ivy? Grandfather, will you not free your hand of the thyrsos?


nanYou persuaded him to this, Teiresias. Do you wish, by introducing another new god to men, to examine birds and receive rewards for sacrifices? If your gray old age did not defend you, you would sit in chains in the midst of the Bacchae


τὸν δαίμονʼ ἀνθρώποισιν ἐσφέρων νέονYou persuaded him to this, Teiresias. Do you wish, by introducing another new god to men, to examine birds and receive rewards for sacrifices? If your gray old age did not defend you, you would sit in chains in the midst of the Bacchae


σκοπεῖν πτερωτοὺς κἀμπύρων μισθοὺς φέρειν.You persuaded him to this, Teiresias. Do you wish, by introducing another new god to men, to examine birds and receive rewards for sacrifices? If your gray old age did not defend you, you would sit in chains in the midst of the Bacchae


εἰ μή σε γῆρας πολιὸν ἐξερρύετοYou persuaded him to this, Teiresias. Do you wish, by introducing another new god to men, to examine birds and receive rewards for sacrifices? If your gray old age did not defend you, you would sit in chains in the midst of the Bacchae


καθῆσʼ ἂν ἐν βάκχαισι δέσμιος μέσαιςYou persuaded him to this, Teiresias. Do you wish, by introducing another new god to men, to examine birds and receive rewards for sacrifices? If your gray old age did not defend you, you would sit in chains in the midst of the Bacchae


τελετὰς πονηρὰς εἰσάγων· γυναιξὶ γὰρfor introducing wicked rites. For where women have the delight of the grape-cluster at a feast, I say that none of their rites is healthy any longer. Chorus Leader


ὅπου βότρυος ἐν δαιτὶ γίγνεται γάνοςfor introducing wicked rites. For where women have the delight of the grape-cluster at a feast, I say that none of their rites is healthy any longer. Chorus Leader


οὐχ ὑγιὲς οὐδὲν ἔτι λέγω τῶν ὀργίων. Χορόςfor introducing wicked rites. For where women have the delight of the grape-cluster at a feast, I say that none of their rites is healthy any longer. Chorus Leader


τῆς δυσσεβείας. ὦ ξένʼ, οὐκ αἰδῇ θεοὺςCHORUS: What impiety! Hast thou no reverence, sir stranger, for the gods or for Cadmus who sowed the crop of earth-born warriors? Son of Echion as thou art, thou dost shame thy birth. TEIRESIAS: Whenso a man of wisdom finds a good topic for argument, it is no difficult matter to speak well; but thou, though possessing a glib tongue as if endowed with sense, art yet devoid thereof in all thou sayest. A headstrong man, if he have influence and a capacity for speaking, makes a bad citizen because he lacks sense. This new deity, whom thou deridest, will rise to power I cannot say how great, throughout Hellas. Two things there are, young prince, that hold first rank among men, the goddess Demeter, that is, the earth, calf her which name thou please; she it is that feedeth men with solid food; and as her counterpart came this god, the son of Semele, who discovered the juice of the grape and introduced it to mankind, stilling thereby each grief that mortals suffer from, soon as e'er they are filled with the juice of the vine; and sleep also he giveth, sleep that brings forgetfulness of daily ills, the sovereign charm for all our woe. God though he is, he serves all other gods for libations, so that through him mankind is blest. He it is whom thou dost mock, because he was sewn up in the thigh of Zeus. But I will show thee this fair mystery. When Zeus had snatched him from the lightning's blaze, and to Olympus borne the tender babe, Hera would have cast him forth from heaven, but Zeus, as such a god well might, devised a counterplot. He broke off a fragment of the ether which surrounds the world, and made thereof a hostage against Hera's bitterness, while he gave out Dionysus into other hands; hence, in time, men said that he was reared in the thigh of Zeus, having changed the word and invented a legend, because the god was once a hostage to the goddess Hera. This god too hath prophetic power, for there is no small prophecy inspired by Bacchic frenzy; for whenever the god in his full might enters the human frame, he makes his frantic votaries foretell the future. Likewise he hath some share in Ares' rights; for oft, or ever a weapon is touched, a panic seizes an army when it is marshalled in array; and this too is a frenzy sent by Dionysus. Yet shalt thou behold him e'en on Delphi's rocks leaping o'er the cloven height, torch in hand, waving and brandishing the branch by Bacchus loved, yea, and through the length and breadth of Hellas. Hearken to me, Pentheus; never boast that might alone doth sway the world, nor if thou think so, unsound as thy opinion is, credit thyself with any wisdom; but receive the god into thy realm, pour out libations, join the revel rout, and crown thy head. It is not Dionysus that will force chastity on women in their love; but this is what we should consider, whether chastity is part of their nature for good and all; for if it is, no really modest maid will ever fall 'mid Bacchic mysteries. Mark this: thou thyself art glad when thousands throng thy gates, and citizens extol the name of Pentheus; he too, I trow, delights in being honoured. Wherefore I and Cadmus, whom thou jeerest so, will wreath our brows with ivy and join the dance; pair of grey beards though we be, still must we take part therein; never will I for any words of thine fight against heaven. Most grievous is thy madness, nor canst thou find a charm to cure thee, albeit charms have caused thy malady.


τῆς δυσσεβείας. ὦ ξένʼ, οὐκ αἰδῇ θεοὺςOh, what impiety! O stranger, do you not reverence the gods and Kadmos who sowed the earth-born crop?


Κάδμον τε τὸν σπείραντα γηγενῆ στάχυνOh, what impiety! O stranger, do you not reverence the gods and Kadmos who sowed the earth-born crop?


Ἐχίονος δʼ ὢν παῖς καταισχύνεις γένος; ΤειρεσίαςDo you, the child of Echion, bring shame to your race? Teiresia


ὅταν λάβῃ τις τῶν λόγων ἀνὴρ σοφὸςWhenever a wise man takes a good occasion for his speech, it is not a great task to speak well. You have a rapid tongue as though you were sensible, but there is no sense in your words.


καλὰς ἀφορμάς, οὐ μέγʼ ἔργον εὖ λέγειν·Whenever a wise man takes a good occasion for his speech, it is not a great task to speak well. You have a rapid tongue as though you were sensible, but there is no sense in your words.


σὺ δʼ εὔτροχον μὲν γλῶσσαν ὡς φρονῶν ἔχειςWhenever a wise man takes a good occasion for his speech, it is not a great task to speak well. You have a rapid tongue as though you were sensible, but there is no sense in your words.


ἐν τοῖς λόγοισι δʼ οὐκ ἔνεισί σοι φρένες.Whenever a wise man takes a good occasion for his speech, it is not a great task to speak well. You have a rapid tongue as though you were sensible, but there is no sense in your words.


θράσει δὲ δυνατὸς καὶ λέγειν οἷός τʼ ἀνὴρA man powerful in his boldness, one capable of speaking well, becomes a bad citizen in his lack of sense. This new god, whom you ridicule, I am unable to express how great he will be throughout Hellas . For two things, young man


κακὸς πολίτης γίγνεται νοῦν οὐκ ἔχων.A man powerful in his boldness, one capable of speaking well, becomes a bad citizen in his lack of sense. This new god, whom you ridicule, I am unable to express how great he will be throughout Hellas . For two things, young man


nanA man powerful in his boldness, one capable of speaking well, becomes a bad citizen in his lack of sense. This new god, whom you ridicule, I am unable to express how great he will be throughout Hellas . For two things, young man


οὐκ ἂν δυναίμην μέγεθος ἐξειπεῖν ὅσοςA man powerful in his boldness, one capable of speaking well, becomes a bad citizen in his lack of sense. This new god, whom you ridicule, I am unable to express how great he will be throughout Hellas . For two things, young man


καθʼ Ἑλλάδʼ ἔσται. δύο γάρ, ὦ νεανίαA man powerful in his boldness, one capable of speaking well, becomes a bad citizen in his lack of sense. This new god, whom you ridicule, I am unable to express how great he will be throughout Hellas . For two things, young man


τὰ πρῶτʼ ἐν ἀνθρώποισι· Δημήτηρ θεά—are first among men: the goddess Demeter—she is the earth, but call her whatever name you wish; she nourishes mortals with dry food; but he who came afterwards, the offspring of Semele, discovered a match to it, the liquid drink of the grape, and introduced it


γῆ δʼ ἐστίν, ὄνομα δʼ ὁπότερον βούλῃ κάλει·are first among men: the goddess Demeter—she is the earth, but call her whatever name you wish; she nourishes mortals with dry food; but he who came afterwards, the offspring of Semele, discovered a match to it, the liquid drink of the grape, and introduced it


αὕτη μὲν ἐν ξηροῖσιν ἐκτρέφει βροτούς·are first among men: the goddess Demeter—she is the earth, but call her whatever name you wish; she nourishes mortals with dry food; but he who came afterwards, the offspring of Semele, discovered a match to it, the liquid drink of the grape, and introduced it


ὃς δʼ ἦλθʼ ἔπειτʼ, ἀντίπαλον ὁ Σεμέλης γόνοςare first among men: the goddess Demeter—she is the earth, but call her whatever name you wish; she nourishes mortals with dry food; but he who came afterwards, the offspring of Semele, discovered a match to it, the liquid drink of the grape, and introduced it


βότρυος ὑγρὸν πῶμʼ ηὗρε κεἰσηνέγκατοare first among men: the goddess Demeter—she is the earth, but call her whatever name you wish; she nourishes mortals with dry food; but he who came afterwards, the offspring of Semele, discovered a match to it, the liquid drink of the grape, and introduced it


θνητοῖς, ὃ παύει τοὺς ταλαιπώρους βροτοὺςto mortals. It releases wretched mortals from grief, whenever they are filled with the stream of the vine, and gives them sleep, a means of forgetting their daily troubles, nor is there another cure for hardships. He who is a god is poured out in offerings to the gods


λύπης, ὅταν πλησθῶσιν ἀμπέλου ῥοῆςto mortals. It releases wretched mortals from grief, whenever they are filled with the stream of the vine, and gives them sleep, a means of forgetting their daily troubles, nor is there another cure for hardships. He who is a god is poured out in offerings to the gods


ὕπνον τε λήθην τῶν καθʼ ἡμέραν κακῶνto mortals. It releases wretched mortals from grief, whenever they are filled with the stream of the vine, and gives them sleep, a means of forgetting their daily troubles, nor is there another cure for hardships. He who is a god is poured out in offerings to the gods


δίδωσιν, οὐδʼ ἔστʼ ἄλλο φάρμακον πόνων.to mortals. It releases wretched mortals from grief, whenever they are filled with the stream of the vine, and gives them sleep, a means of forgetting their daily troubles, nor is there another cure for hardships. He who is a god is poured out in offerings to the gods


οὗτος θεοῖσι σπένδεται θεὸς γεγώςto mortals. It releases wretched mortals from grief, whenever they are filled with the stream of the vine, and gives them sleep, a means of forgetting their daily troubles, nor is there another cure for hardships. He who is a god is poured out in offerings to the gods


ὥστε διὰ τοῦτον τἀγάθʼ ἀνθρώπους ἔχειν.o that by his means men may have good things. And do you laugh at him, because he was sewn up in Zeus’ thigh? I will teach you that this is well: when Zeus snatched him out of the lighting-flame, and led the child as a god to Olympus


nano that by his means men may have good things. And do you laugh at him, because he was sewn up in Zeus’ thigh? I will teach you that this is well: when Zeus snatched him out of the lighting-flame, and led the child as a god to Olympus


μηρῷ; διδάξω σʼ ὡς καλῶς ἔχει τόδε.o that by his means men may have good things. And do you laugh at him, because he was sewn up in Zeus’ thigh? I will teach you that this is well: when Zeus snatched him out of the lighting-flame, and led the child as a god to Olympus


ἐπεί νιν ἥρπασʼ ἐκ πυρὸς κεραυνίουo that by his means men may have good things. And do you laugh at him, because he was sewn up in Zeus’ thigh? I will teach you that this is well: when Zeus snatched him out of the lighting-flame, and led the child as a god to Olympus


Ζεύς, ἐς δʼ Ὄλυμπον βρέφος ἀνήγαγεν θεόνo that by his means men may have good things. And do you laugh at him, because he was sewn up in Zeus’ thigh? I will teach you that this is well: when Zeus snatched him out of the lighting-flame, and led the child as a god to Olympus


Ἥρα νιν ἤθελʼ ἐκβαλεῖν ἀπʼ οὐρανοῦ·Hera wished to banish him from the sky, but Zeus, as a god, had a counter-contrivance. Having broken a part of the air which surrounds the earth, he gave this to Hera as a pledge protecting the real A line of text has apparently been lost here. Dionysus from her hostility. But in time


Ζεὺς δʼ ἀντεμηχανήσαθʼ οἷα δὴ θεός.Hera wished to banish him from the sky, but Zeus, as a god, had a counter-contrivance. Having broken a part of the air which surrounds the earth, he gave this to Hera as a pledge protecting the real A line of text has apparently been lost here. Dionysus from her hostility. But in time


ῥήξας μέρος τι τοῦ χθόνʼ ἐγκυκλουμένουHera wished to banish him from the sky, but Zeus, as a god, had a counter-contrivance. Having broken a part of the air which surrounds the earth, he gave this to Hera as a pledge protecting the real A line of text has apparently been lost here. Dionysus from her hostility. But in time


αἰθέρος, ἔθηκε τόνδʼ ὅμηρον ἐκδιδούςHera wished to banish him from the sky, but Zeus, as a god, had a counter-contrivance. Having broken a part of the air which surrounds the earth, he gave this to Hera as a pledge protecting the real A line of text has apparently been lost here. Dionysus from her hostility. But in time


nanHera wished to banish him from the sky, but Zeus, as a god, had a counter-contrivance. Having broken a part of the air which surrounds the earth, he gave this to Hera as a pledge protecting the real A line of text has apparently been lost here. Dionysus from her hostility. But in time


Διόνυσον Ἥρας νεικέων· χρόνῳ δέ νινHera wished to banish him from the sky, but Zeus, as a god, had a counter-contrivance. Having broken a part of the air which surrounds the earth, he gave this to Hera as a pledge protecting the real A line of text has apparently been lost here. Dionysus from her hostility. But in time


βροτοὶ ῥαφῆναί φασιν ἐν μηρῷ Διόςmortals say that he was nourished in the thigh of Zeus, changing the word, because a god he had served as a hostage for the goddess Hera, and composing the story. The account given in lines 292f. of the development of this legend is based on the similarity between the Greek words for hostage ( ὅμηρος ) and thigh ( μηρός ). But this god is a prophet—for Bacchic revelry and madness have in them much prophetic skill.


ὄνομα μεταστήσαντες, ὅτι θεᾷ θεὸςmortals say that he was nourished in the thigh of Zeus, changing the word, because a god he had served as a hostage for the goddess Hera, and composing the story. The account given in lines 292f. of the development of this legend is based on the similarity between the Greek words for hostage ( ὅμηρος ) and thigh ( μηρός ). But this god is a prophet—for Bacchic revelry and madness have in them much prophetic skill.


Ἥρᾳ ποθʼ ὡμήρευσε, συνθέντες λόγον.mortals say that he was nourished in the thigh of Zeus, changing the word, because a god he had served as a hostage for the goddess Hera, and composing the story. The account given in lines 292f. of the development of this legend is based on the similarity between the Greek words for hostage ( ὅμηρος ) and thigh ( μηρός ). But this god is a prophet—for Bacchic revelry and madness have in them much prophetic skill.


nanmortals say that he was nourished in the thigh of Zeus, changing the word, because a god he had served as a hostage for the goddess Hera, and composing the story. The account given in lines 292f. of the development of this legend is based on the similarity between the Greek words for hostage ( ὅμηρος ) and thigh ( μηρός ). But this god is a prophet—for Bacchic revelry and madness have in them much prophetic skill.


καὶ τὸ μανιῶδες μαντικὴν πολλὴν ἔχει·mortals say that he was nourished in the thigh of Zeus, changing the word, because a god he had served as a hostage for the goddess Hera, and composing the story. The account given in lines 292f. of the development of this legend is based on the similarity between the Greek words for hostage ( ὅμηρος ) and thigh ( μηρός ). But this god is a prophet—for Bacchic revelry and madness have in them much prophetic skill.


ὅταν γὰρ ὁ θεὸς ἐς τὸ σῶμʼ ἔλθῃ πολύςFor whenever the god enters a body in full force, he makes the frantic to foretell the future. He also possesses a share of Ares’ nature. For terror sometimes flutters an army under arms and in its ranks before it even touches a spear;


λέγειν τὸ μέλλον τοὺς μεμηνότας ποιεῖ.For whenever the god enters a body in full force, he makes the frantic to foretell the future. He also possesses a share of Ares’ nature. For terror sometimes flutters an army under arms and in its ranks before it even touches a spear;


Ἄρεώς τε μοῖραν μεταλαβὼν ἔχει τινά·For whenever the god enters a body in full force, he makes the frantic to foretell the future. He also possesses a share of Ares’ nature. For terror sometimes flutters an army under arms and in its ranks before it even touches a spear;


στρατὸν γὰρ ἐν ὅπλοις ὄντα κἀπὶ τάξεσινFor whenever the god enters a body in full force, he makes the frantic to foretell the future. He also possesses a share of Ares’ nature. For terror sometimes flutters an army under arms and in its ranks before it even touches a spear;


φόβος διεπτόησε πρὶν λόγχης θιγεῖν.For whenever the god enters a body in full force, he makes the frantic to foretell the future. He also possesses a share of Ares’ nature. For terror sometimes flutters an army under arms and in its ranks before it even touches a spear;


μανία δὲ καὶ τοῦτʼ ἐστὶ Διονύσου πάρα.and this too is a frenzy from Dionysus. You will see him also on the rocks of Delphi , bounding with torches through the highland of two peaks, leaping and shaking the Bacchic branch, mighty throughout Hellas . But believe me, Pentheus;


ἔτʼ αὐτὸν ὄψῃ κἀπὶ Δελφίσιν πέτραιςand this too is a frenzy from Dionysus. You will see him also on the rocks of Delphi , bounding with torches through the highland of two peaks, leaping and shaking the Bacchic branch, mighty throughout Hellas . But believe me, Pentheus;


πηδῶντα σὺν πεύκαισι δικόρυφον πλάκαand this too is a frenzy from Dionysus. You will see him also on the rocks of Delphi , bounding with torches through the highland of two peaks, leaping and shaking the Bacchic branch, mighty throughout Hellas . But believe me, Pentheus;


πάλλοντα καὶ σείοντα βακχεῖον κλάδονand this too is a frenzy from Dionysus. You will see him also on the rocks of Delphi , bounding with torches through the highland of two peaks, leaping and shaking the Bacchic branch, mighty throughout Hellas . But believe me, Pentheus;


μέγαν τʼ ἀνʼ Ἑλλάδα. ἀλλʼ ἐμοί, Πενθεῦ, πιθοῦ·and this too is a frenzy from Dionysus. You will see him also on the rocks of Delphi , bounding with torches through the highland of two peaks, leaping and shaking the Bacchic branch, mighty throughout Hellas . But believe me, Pentheus;


μὴ τὸ κράτος αὔχει δύναμιν ἀνθρώποις ἔχεινdo not boast that sovereignty has power among men, nor, even if you think so, and your mind is diseased, believe that you are being at all wise. Receive the god into your land, pour libations to him, celebrate the Bacchic rites, and garland your head.Dionysus will not compel women


μηδʼ, ἢν δοκῇς μέν, ἡ δὲ δόξα σου νοσῇdo not boast that sovereignty has power among men, nor, even if you think so, and your mind is diseased, believe that you are being at all wise. Receive the god into your land, pour libations to him, celebrate the Bacchic rites, and garland your head.Dionysus will not compel women


φρονεῖν δόκει τι· τὸν θεὸν δʼ ἐς γῆν δέχουdo not boast that sovereignty has power among men, nor, even if you think so, and your mind is diseased, believe that you are being at all wise. Receive the god into your land, pour libations to him, celebrate the Bacchic rites, and garland your head.Dionysus will not compel women


καὶ σπένδε καὶ βάκχευε καὶ στέφου κάρα.do not boast that sovereignty has power among men, nor, even if you think so, and your mind is diseased, believe that you are being at all wise. Receive the god into your land, pour libations to him, celebrate the Bacchic rites, and garland your head.Dionysus will not compel women


nando not boast that sovereignty has power among men, nor, even if you think so, and your mind is diseased, believe that you are being at all wise. Receive the god into your land, pour libations to him, celebrate the Bacchic rites, and garland your head.Dionysus will not compel women


γυναῖκας ἐς τὴν Κύπριν, ἀλλʼ ἐν τῇ φύσειto be modest in regard to Aphrodite, but in nature modesty dwells always you must look for that. For she who is modest will not be corrupted in Bacchic revelry. Do you see? You rejoice whenever many people are at your gates


τὸ σωφρονεῖν ἔνεστιν εἰς τὰ πάντʼ ἀείto be modest in regard to Aphrodite, but in nature modesty dwells always you must look for that. For she who is modest will not be corrupted in Bacchic revelry. Do you see? You rejoice whenever many people are at your gates


τοῦτο σκοπεῖν χρή· καὶ γὰρ ἐν βακχεύμασινto be modest in regard to Aphrodite, but in nature modesty dwells always you must look for that. For she who is modest will not be corrupted in Bacchic revelry. Do you see? You rejoice whenever many people are at your gates


οὖσʼ ἥ γε σώφρων οὐ διαφθαρήσεται.to be modest in regard to Aphrodite, but in nature modesty dwells always you must look for that. For she who is modest will not be corrupted in Bacchic revelry. Do you see? You rejoice whenever many people are at your gates


nanto be modest in regard to Aphrodite, but in nature modesty dwells always you must look for that. For she who is modest will not be corrupted in Bacchic revelry. Do you see? You rejoice whenever many people are at your gates


πολλοί, τὸ Πενθέως δʼ ὄνομα μεγαλύνῃ πόλις·and the city extols the name of Pentheus. He too, I think, delights in being honored. Kadmos, whom you mock, and I will crown our heads with ivy and dance, a gray yoke-team but still we must dance;


κἀκεῖνος, οἶμαι, τέρπεται τιμώμενος.and the city extols the name of Pentheus. He too, I think, delights in being honored. Kadmos, whom you mock, and I will crown our heads with ivy and dance, a gray yoke-team but still we must dance;


ἐγὼ μὲν οὖν καὶ Κάδμος, ὃν σὺ διαγελᾷςand the city extols the name of Pentheus. He too, I think, delights in being honored. Kadmos, whom you mock, and I will crown our heads with ivy and dance, a gray yoke-team but still we must dance;


κισσῷ τʼ ἐρεψόμεσθα καὶ χορεύσομενand the city extols the name of Pentheus. He too, I think, delights in being honored. Kadmos, whom you mock, and I will crown our heads with ivy and dance, a gray yoke-team but still we must dance;


πολιὰ ξυνωρίς, ἀλλʼ ὅμως χορευτέονand the city extols the name of Pentheus. He too, I think, delights in being honored. Kadmos, whom you mock, and I will crown our heads with ivy and dance, a gray yoke-team but still we must dance;


κοὐ θεομαχήσω σῶν λόγων πεισθεὶς ὕπο.and I will not be persuaded by your words to fight against the god. For you are mad in a most grievous way, and you will not be cured by drugs, nor are you sick without them. Chorus Leader


μαίνῃ γὰρ ὡς ἄλγιστα, κοὔτε φαρμάκοιςand I will not be persuaded by your words to fight against the god. For you are mad in a most grievous way, and you will not be cured by drugs, nor are you sick without them. Chorus Leader


ἄκη λάβοις ἂν οὔτʼ ἄνευ τούτων νοσεῖς. Χορόςand I will not be persuaded by your words to fight against the god. For you are mad in a most grievous way, and you will not be cured by drugs, nor are you sick without them. Chorus Leader


ὦ πρέσβυ, Φοῖβόν τʼ οὐ καταισχύνεις λόγοιςCHORUS: Old sir, thy words do not discredit Phoebus, and thou art wise in honouring Bromius, potent deity. CADMUS: My son, Teiresias hath given thee sound advice; dwell with us, but o'erstep not the threshold of custom; for now thou art soaring aloft, and thy wisdom is no wisdom. E'en though he be no god, as thou assertest, still say he is; be guilty of a splendid fraud, declaring him the son of Semele, that she may be thought the mother of a god, and we and all our race gain honour. Dost thou mark the awful fate of Actaeon? whom savage hounds of his own rearing rent in pieces in the meadows, because he boasted himself a better hunter than Artemis. Lest thy fate be the same, come let me crown thy head with ivy; join us in rendering homage to the god. PENTHEUS: Touch me not away to thy Bacchic rites thyself! never try to infect me with thy foolery! Vengeance will I have on the fellow who teaches thee such senselessness. Away one of you without delay! seek yonder seat where he observes his birds, wrench it from its base with levers, turn it upside down, o'erthrowing it in utter confusion, and toss his garlands to the tempest's blast. For by so doing shall I wound him most deeply. Others of you range the city and hunt down this girl-faced stranger, who is introducing a new complaint amongst our women, and doing outrage to the marriage tie. And if haply ye catch him, bring him hither to me in chains, to be stoned to death, a bitter ending to his revelry in Thebes. Exit PENTHEUS.


ὦ πρέσβυ, Φοῖβόν τʼ οὐ καταισχύνεις λόγοιςOld man, you do not shame Phoebus with your words, and honoring Dionysus, a great god, you are prudent. Kadmo


τιμῶν τε Βρόμιον σωφρονεῖς, μέγαν θεόν. ΚάδμοςOld man, you do not shame Phoebus with your words, and honoring Dionysus, a great god, you are prudent. Kadmo


ὦ παῖ, καλῶς σοι Τειρεσίας παρῄνεσεν.My child, Teiresias has advised you well. Dwell with us, not apart from the laws. For now you flit about and have thoughts without thinking. Even if, as you say, he is not a god, call him one; and tell a glorious falsehood


οἴκει μεθʼ ἡμῶν, μὴ θύραζε τῶν νόμων.My child, Teiresias has advised you well. Dwell with us, not apart from the laws. For now you flit about and have thoughts without thinking. Even if, as you say, he is not a god, call him one; and tell a glorious falsehood


νῦν γὰρ πέτῃ τε καὶ φρονῶν οὐδὲν φρονεῖς.My child, Teiresias has advised you well. Dwell with us, not apart from the laws. For now you flit about and have thoughts without thinking. Even if, as you say, he is not a god, call him one; and tell a glorious falsehood


κεἰ μὴ γὰρ ἔστιν ὁ θεὸς οὗτος, ὡς σὺ φῄςMy child, Teiresias has advised you well. Dwell with us, not apart from the laws. For now you flit about and have thoughts without thinking. Even if, as you say, he is not a god, call him one; and tell a glorious falsehood


παρὰ σοὶ λεγέσθω· καὶ καταψεύδου καλῶςMy child, Teiresias has advised you well. Dwell with us, not apart from the laws. For now you flit about and have thoughts without thinking. Even if, as you say, he is not a god, call him one; and tell a glorious falsehood


ὡς ἔστι, Σεμέλη θʼ ἵνα δοκῇ θεὸν τεκεῖνo that Semele might seem to have borne a god, and honor might come to all our race. You see the wretched fate of Actaeon, who was torn apart in the meadows by the blood-thirsty hounds he had raised


ἡμῖν τε τιμὴ παντὶ τῷ γένει προσῇ.o that Semele might seem to have borne a god, and honor might come to all our race. You see the wretched fate of Actaeon, who was torn apart in the meadows by the blood-thirsty hounds he had raised


nano that Semele might seem to have borne a god, and honor might come to all our race. You see the wretched fate of Actaeon, who was torn apart in the meadows by the blood-thirsty hounds he had raised


ὃν ὠμόσιτοι σκύλακες ἃς ἐθρέψατοo that Semele might seem to have borne a god, and honor might come to all our race. You see the wretched fate of Actaeon, who was torn apart in the meadows by the blood-thirsty hounds he had raised


διεσπάσαντο, κρείσσονʼ ἐν κυναγίαιςo that Semele might seem to have borne a god, and honor might come to all our race. You see the wretched fate of Actaeon, who was torn apart in the meadows by the blood-thirsty hounds he had raised


Ἀρτέμιδος εἶναι κομπάσαντʼ, ἐν ὀργάσιν.having boasted that he was superior in the hunt to Artemis. May you not suffer this. Come, let me crown your head with ivy; honor the god along with us. Pentheu


ὃ μὴ πάθῃς σύ· δεῦρό σου στέψω κάραhaving boasted that he was superior in the hunt to Artemis. May you not suffer this. Come, let me crown your head with ivy; honor the god along with us. Pentheu


κισσῷ· μεθʼ ἡμῶν τῷ θεῷ τιμὴν δίδου. Πενθεύςhaving boasted that he was superior in the hunt to Artemis. May you not suffer this. Come, let me crown your head with ivy; honor the god along with us. Pentheu


οὐ μὴ προσοίσεις χεῖρα, βακχεύσεις δʼ ἰώνDon’t lay a hand on me! Go off and hold your revels, but don’t wipe your foolishness off on me. I will seek the punishment of thi


μηδʼ ἐξομόρξῃ μωρίαν τὴν σὴν ἐμοί;Don’t lay a hand on me! Go off and hold your revels, but don’t wipe your foolishness off on me. I will seek the punishment of thi


τῆς σῆς δʼ ἀνοίας τόνδε τὸν διδάσκαλονteacher of your folly. Let someone go quickly to the seat where he watches the flights of birds, upset and overturn it with levers, turning everything upside down;


δίκην μέτειμι. στειχέτω τις ὡς τάχοςteacher of your folly. Let someone go quickly to the seat where he watches the flights of birds, upset and overturn it with levers, turning everything upside down;


ἐλθὼν δὲ θάκους τοῦδʼ ἵνʼ οἰωνοσκοπεῖteacher of your folly. Let someone go quickly to the seat where he watches the flights of birds, upset and overturn it with levers, turning everything upside down;


μοχλοῖς τριαίνου κἀνάτρεψον ἔμπαλινteacher of your folly. Let someone go quickly to the seat where he watches the flights of birds, upset and overturn it with levers, turning everything upside down;


ἄνω κάτω τὰ πάντα συγχέας ὁμοῦteacher of your folly. Let someone go quickly to the seat where he watches the flights of birds, upset and overturn it with levers, turning everything upside down;


καὶ στέμματʼ ἀνέμοις καὶ θυέλλαισιν μέθες.and release his garlands to the winds and storms. In this way I will especially wound him. And some of you hunt throughout the city for this effeminate stranger, who introduces a new disease to women and pollutes our beds.


μάλιστα γάρ νιν δήξομαι δράσας τάδε.and release his garlands to the winds and storms. In this way I will especially wound him. And some of you hunt throughout the city for this effeminate stranger, who introduces a new disease to women and pollutes our beds.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Euripides, Andromache, 167, 166 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

166. σαίρειν τε δῶμα τοὐμὸν ἐκ χρυσηλάτων
2. Euripides, Bacchae, 11, 1338-1339, 171-369, 641-656, 992-996, 10 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. αἰνῶ δὲ Κάδμον, ἄβατον ὃς πέδον τόδε 10. I praise Kadmos, who has made this place hallowed, the shrine of his daughter; and I have covered it all around with the cluster-bearing leaf of the vine.I have left the wealthy lands of the Lydians and Phrygians, the sun-parched plains of the Persians
3. Euripides, Cretes (Fragmenta Papyracea), 472 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Electra, 404-405, 190 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Euripides, Hecuba, 1115, 1114 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Euripides, Helen, 1227-1228, 132, 138, 160-161, 73, 118 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

118. ὥσπερ γε σέ, οὐδὲν ἧσσον, ὀφθαλμοῖς ὁρῶ. 118. I saw her with my own eyes, just as I see you, no less. Helen
7. Euripides, Ion, 103-111, 136-140, 150, 94-97, 102 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1540-1545, 302-303, 1539 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1539. Why, daughter
9. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 891 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. New Testament, John, 15.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15.1. I am the true vine, and my Father is the farmer.
11. New Testament, Matthew, 26.26-26.28 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

26.26. As they were eating, Jesus took bread, gave thanks for it, and broke it. He gave to the disciples, and said, "Take, eat; this is my body. 26.27. He took the cup, gave thanks, and gave to them, saying, "All of you drink it 26.28. for this is my blood of the new covet, which is poured out for many for the remission of sins.
12. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 12.119-12.120 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agamemnon, suppliants Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 612
alcestis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
andromache Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
aphrodite Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 178
cadmus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 178, 180
characters, minor Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
concepts/values/beliefs Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 178, 180
context/environment/milieu, socio-cultural, ideological Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
cult-establishment/foundation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 175, 178, 180
cyclops Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 612
delphi Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 612
dionyso(u)s Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 612
euripides, bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 178
euripides, exodos (missing part/lacuna) of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
euripides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
helen Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
hypsipyle Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 612
initiands/initiates/initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
ion Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 612
jesus christ, and dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
jesus christ Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
justice (δίκη)/retribution (divine) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
knox, b.m.w. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 612
kyriakou, p. xxii Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 925
lloyd, m. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 612
lloyd, michael Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
makarismos Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 175
mystery Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
mystic initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
nicodemus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
oikeia pragmata Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 612
orestes Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 612
paul st. Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 178
philia (friendship) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
realism Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 612
reception, of concepts and ideas Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 175, 178, 180
redemption Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
refiguration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
replacement/substitution of names Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 175
resemblances, reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 175, 178, 180
resemblances Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175, 180
segal, c. p. Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
semele Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
sophia/sophos (wisdom) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 178, 180
sophia and philia Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
sophism of teiresias in bacchae' Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
suppliant women bacchae compared Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
sōphrosynē/sōphrōn Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 178
taplin, oliver Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 144
teiresias Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174, 178, 180
thebes Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
theologos (iohannes) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
theotokos (mother of god), and the chorus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
theotokos (mother of god) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 175
variations Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174
xxii, dramatis personae (characters) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 180
zeus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 174