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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5614
Euripides, Bacchae, 116-129


εἰς ὄρος εἰς ὄρος, ἔνθα μένειwhoever leads the sacred band is Bromius—to the mountain, to the mountain, where the crowd of women waits, goaded away from their weaving by Dionysus. Choru


θηλυγενὴς ὄχλοςwhoever leads the sacred band is Bromius—to the mountain, to the mountain, where the crowd of women waits, goaded away from their weaving by Dionysus. Choru


ἀφʼ ἱστῶν παρὰ κερκίδων τʼwhoever leads the sacred band is Bromius—to the mountain, to the mountain, where the crowd of women waits, goaded away from their weaving by Dionysus. Choru


οἰστρηθεὶς Διονύσῳ. Χορόςwhoever leads the sacred band is Bromius—to the mountain, to the mountain, where the crowd of women waits, goaded away from their weaving by Dionysus. Choru


ὦ θαλάμευμα Κουρήτων word split in text O hidden cave of the Curetes! O hallowed haunts in Crete, that saw Zeus born, where Corybantes with crested helms devised for me in their grotto the rounded timbrel of ox-hide, mingling Bacchic minstrelsy with the shrill sweet accents of the Phrygian flute, a gift bestowed by them on mother Rhea, to add its crash of music to the Bacchantes' shouts of joy; but frantic satyrs won it from the mother-goddess for their own, and added it to their dances in festivals, which gladden the heart of Dionysus, each third recurrent year. Oh! happy that votary, when from the hurrying revel-rout he sinks to earth, in his holy robe of fawnskin, chasing the goat to drink its blood, a banquet sweet of flesh uncooked, as he hastes to Phrygia's or to Libya's hills; while in the van the Bromian god exults with cries of Evoe. With milk and wine and streams of luscious honey flows the earth, and Syrian incense smokes. While the Bacchante holding in his hand a blazing torch of pine uplifted on his wand waves it, as he speeds along, rousing wandering votaries, and as he waves it cries aloud with wanton tresses tossing in the breeze; and thus to crown the revelry, he raises loud his voice, "On, on, ye Bacchanals, pride of Tmolus with its rills of gold I to the sound of the booming drum, chanting in joyous strains the praises of your joyous god with Phrygian accents lifted high, what time the holy lute with sweet complaining note invites you to your hallowed sport, according well with feet that hurry wildly to the hills; like a colt that gambols at its mother's side in the pasture, with gladsome heart each Bacchante bounds along." Enter TEIRESIAS.


ὦ θαλάμευμα Κουρήτων word split in text O secret chamber of the Kouretes and you holy Cretan caves, parents to Zeus, where the Korybantes with triple helmet invented for me in their caves this circle


ζάθεοί τε ΚρήταςO secret chamber of the Kouretes and you holy Cretan caves, parents to Zeus, where the Korybantes with triple helmet invented for me in their caves this circle


Διογενέτορες ἔναυλοιO secret chamber of the Kouretes and you holy Cretan caves, parents to Zeus, where the Korybantes with triple helmet invented for me in their caves this circle


ἔνθα τρικόρυθες ἄντροιςO secret chamber of the Kouretes and you holy Cretan caves, parents to Zeus, where the Korybantes with triple helmet invented for me in their caves this circle


βυρσότονον κύκλωμα τόδεO secret chamber of the Kouretes and you holy Cretan caves, parents to Zeus, where the Korybantes with triple helmet invented for me in their caves this circle


μοι Κορύβαντες ηὗρον·covered with stretched hide; and in their excited revelry they mingled it with the sweet-voiced breath of Phrygian pipes and handed it over to mother Rhea, resounding with the sweet songs of the Bacchae;


βακχείᾳ δʼ ἀνὰ συντόνῳcovered with stretched hide; and in their excited revelry they mingled it with the sweet-voiced breath of Phrygian pipes and handed it over to mother Rhea, resounding with the sweet songs of the Bacchae;


κέρασαν ἁδυβόᾳ Φρυγίωνcovered with stretched hide; and in their excited revelry they mingled it with the sweet-voiced breath of Phrygian pipes and handed it over to mother Rhea, resounding with the sweet songs of the Bacchae;


αὐλῶν πνεύματι ματρός τε Ῥέας ἐςcovered with stretched hide; and in their excited revelry they mingled it with the sweet-voiced breath of Phrygian pipes and handed it over to mother Rhea, resounding with the sweet songs of the Bacchae;


χέρα θῆκαν, κτύπον εὐάσμασι Βακχᾶν·covered with stretched hide; and in their excited revelry they mingled it with the sweet-voiced breath of Phrygian pipes and handed it over to mother Rhea, resounding with the sweet songs of the Bacchae;


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

39 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 563 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

563. And slumber in a bedroom far within
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 117 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

117. of the immortal gods, and those created
3. Homer, Iliad, 13.625 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

13.625. /who shall some day destroy your high city. For ye bare forth wantonly over sea my wedded wife and therewithal much treasure, when it was with her that ye had found entertainment; and now again ye are full fain to fling consuming fire on the sea-faring ships, and to slay the Achaean warriors.
4. Homer, Odyssey, 9.270-9.271 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5. Homeric Hymns, To Demeter, 47, 211 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

211. Around her slender feet her dark-blue dre
6. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 61, 362 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

362. Δία τοι ξένιον μέγαν αἰδοῦμαι 362. Ay, Zeus I fear — the guest’s friend great — who was
7. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 179 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

179. φιλοθύτων δέ τοι πόλεος ὀργίων
8. Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 616 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

616. ἄναξ Πελασγῶν, ἱκεσίου Ζηνὸς κότον
9. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 5.10 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 730 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

730. ἐπόθουν τυ ναὶ τὸν φίλιον ᾇπερ ματέρα.
11. Aristophanes, Frogs, 356 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

356. ἢ γενναίων ὄργια Μουσῶν μήτ' εἶδεν μήτ' ἐχόρευσεν
12. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 985-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. εὐπέταλος ἕλικι θάλλει.
13. Euripides, Bacchae, 1000-1009, 101, 1010-1019, 102, 1020-1029, 103, 1030-1039, 104, 1040-1049, 105, 1050-1059, 106, 1060-1069, 107, 1070-1079, 108, 1080-1089, 109, 1090-1099, 110, 1100-1109, 111, 1110-1119, 112, 1120-1129, 113, 1130-1139, 114, 1140-1149, 115, 1150-1152, 117-123, 1236, 124-129, 13, 130-139, 14, 140-149, 15, 150-159, 16, 160-169, 17-20, 215-225, 243, 280-281, 306-309, 314-318, 330-431, 434-469, 487, 55-57, 570, 576-579, 58, 580-589, 59, 590-599, 60, 600-609, 61, 610-619, 62, 620-629, 63, 630-639, 64, 640-649, 65, 650-656, 66, 667, 67, 677-679, 68, 680-689, 69, 690-699, 70, 700-709, 71, 710-719, 72, 720-729, 73, 730-739, 74, 740-749, 75, 750-759, 76, 760-769, 77, 770-774, 78-87, 876, 88-91, 918-919, 92, 920-929, 93, 930-939, 94, 940-949, 95, 950-959, 96, 960-969, 97, 970-979, 98, 980-989, 99, 990-999, 100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. τέλεσαν, ταυρόκερων θεὸν 100. had perfected him, the bull-horned god, and he crowned him with crowns of snakes, for which reason Maenads cloak their wild prey over their locks. Choru
14. Euripides, Hecuba, 345 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

345. θάρσει: πέφευγας τὸν ἐμὸν ̔Ικέσιον Δία: 345. Take heart; you are safe from the suppliant’s god in my case, for I will follow you, both because I must and because it is my wish to die; for if I were unwilling, a coward would I show myself, a woman faint of heart. Why should I prolong my days? I whose father was lord
15. Euripides, Helen, 1302-1368, 1301 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1301. ̓Ορεία ποτὲ δρομάδι κώ- 1301. Once with swift foot the mountain mother of the gods rushed through the wooded glen, and the river’s stream
16. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1121, 141-144, 25, 1025 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1025. Now by Zeus, the god of oaths, and by the earth, whereon we stand, I swear to thee I never did lay hand upon thy wife nor would have wished to, or have harboured such a thought Slay me, ye gods! rob me of name and honour, from home and city cast me forth, a wandering exile o’er the earth!
17. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 684-687, 683 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. Euripides, Rhesus, 973, 972 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

972. As under far Pangaion Orpheus lies
19. Herodotus, Histories, 1.44, 5.49, 5.92, 9.7 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.44. Distraught by the death of his son, Croesus cried out the more vehemently because the killer was one whom he himself had cleansed of blood, ,and in his great and terrible grief at this mischance he called on Zeus by three names—Zeus the Purifier, Zeus of the Hearth, Zeus of Comrades: the first, because he wanted the god to know what evil his guest had done him; the second, because he had received the guest into his house and thus unwittingly entertained the murderer of his son; and the third, because he had found his worst enemy in the man whom he had sent as a protector. 5.49. It was in the reign of Cleomenes that Aristagoras the tyrant of Miletus came to Sparta. When he had an audience with the king, as the Lacedaemonians report, he brought with him a bronze tablet on which the map of all the earth was engraved, and all the sea and all the rivers. ,Having been admitted to converse with Cleomenes, Aristagoras spoke thus to him: “Do not wonder, Cleomenes, that I have been so eager to come here, for our present situation is such that the sons of the Ionians are slaves and not free men, which is shameful and grievous particularly to ourselves but also, of all others, to you, inasmuch as you are the leaders of Hellas. ,Now, therefore, we entreat you by the gods of Hellas to save your Ionian kinsmen from slavery. This is a thing which you can easily achieve, for the strangers are not valiant men while your valor in war is preeminent. As for their manner of fighting, they carry bows and short spears, and they go to battle with trousers on their legs and turbans on their heads. ,Accordingly, they are easy to overcome. Furthermore, the inhabitants of that continent have more good things than all other men together, gold first but also silver, bronze, colored cloth, beasts of burden, and slaves. All this you can have to your heart's desire. ,The lands in which they dwell lie next to each other, as I shall show: next to the Ionians are the Lydians, who inhabit a good land and have great store of silver.” (This he said pointing to the map of the earth which he had brought engraved on the tablet.) “Next to the Lydians,” said Aristagoras, “you see the Phrygians to the east, men that of all known to me are the richest in flocks and in the fruits of the earth. ,Close by them are the Cappadocians, whom we call Syrians, and their neighbors are the Cilicians, whose land reaches to the sea over there, in which you see the island of Cyprus lying. The yearly tribute which they pay to the king is five hundred talents. Next to the Cilicians, are the Armenians, another people rich in flocks, and after the Armenians, the Matieni, whose country I show you. ,Adjoining these you see the Cissian land, in which, on the Choaspes, lies that Susa where the great king lives and where the storehouses of his wealth are located. Take that city, and you need not fear to challenge Zeus for riches. ,You should suspend your war, then, for strips of land of no great worth—for that fight with with Messenians, who are matched in strength with you, and Arcadians and Argives, men who have nothing in the way of gold or silver (for which things many are spurred by zeal to fight and die). Yet when you can readily be masters of all Asia, will you refuse to attempt it?” ,Thus spoke Aristagoras, and Cleomenes replied: “Milesian, my guest, wait till the third day for my answer.” 5.92. These were the words of the Lacedaemonians, but their words were ill-received by the greater part of their allies. The rest then keeping silence, Socles, a Corinthian, said, ,“In truth heaven will be beneath the earth and the earth aloft above the heaven, and men will dwell in the sea and fishes where men dwelt before, now that you, Lacedaemonians, are destroying the rule of equals and making ready to bring back tyranny into the cities, tyranny, a thing more unrighteous and bloodthirsty than anything else on this earth. ,If indeed it seems to you to be a good thing that the cities be ruled by tyrants, set up a tyrant among yourselves first and then seek to set up such for the rest. As it is, however, you, who have never made trial of tyrants and take the greatest precautions that none will arise at Sparta, deal wrongfully with your allies. If you had such experience of that thing as we have, you would be more prudent advisers concerning it than you are now.” ,The Corinthian state was ordered in such manner as I will show.There was an oligarchy, and this group of men, called the Bacchiadae, held sway in the city, marrying and giving in marriage among themselves. Now Amphion, one of these men, had a crippled daughter, whose name was Labda. Since none of the Bacchiadae would marry her, she was wedded to Eetion son of Echecrates, of the township of Petra, a Lapith by lineage and of the posterity of Caeneus. ,When no sons were born to him by this wife or any other, he set out to Delphi to enquire concerning the matter of acquiring offspring. As soon as he entered, the Pythian priestess spoke these verses to him: quote type="oracle" l met="dact" Eetion,worthy of honor, no man honors you. /l l Labda is with child, and her child will be a millstone /l lWhich will fall upon the rulers and will bring justice to Corinth. /l /quote ,This oracle which was given to Eetion was in some way made known to the Bacchiadae. The earlier oracle sent to Corinth had not been understood by them, despite the fact that its meaning was the same as the meaning of the oracle of Eetion, and it read as follows: quote type="oracle" l met="dact"An eagle in the rocks has conceived, and will bring forth a lion, /l lStrong and fierce. The knees of many will it loose. /l lThis consider well, Corinthians, /l lYou who dwell by lovely Pirene and the overhanging heights of Corinth. /l /quote ,This earlier prophecy had been unintelligible to the Bacchiadae, but as soon as they heard the one which was given to Eetion, they understood it at once, recognizing its similarity with the oracle of Eetion. Now understanding both oracles, they kept quiet but resolved to do away with the offspring of Eetion. Then, as soon as his wife had given birth, they sent ten men of their clan to the township where Eetion dwelt to kill the child. ,These men came to Petra and passing into Eetion's courtyard, asked for the child. Labda, knowing nothing of the purpose of their coming and thinking that they wished to see the baby out of affection for its father, brought it and placed it into the hands of one of them. Now they had planned on their way that the first of them who received the child should dash it to the ground. ,When, however, Labda brought and handed over the child, by divine chance it smiled at the man who took it. This he saw, and compassion prevented him from killing it. Filled with pity, he handed it to a second, and this man again to a third.In fact it passed from hand to hand to each of the ten, for none would make an end of it. ,They then gave the child back to its mother, and after going out, they stood before the door reproaching and upbraiding one another, but chiefly him who had first received it since he had not acted in accordance with their agreement. Finally they resolved to go in again and all have a hand in the killing. ,Fate, however, had decreed that Eetion's offspring should be the source of ills for Corinth, for Labda, standing close to this door, heard all this. Fearing that they would change their minds and that they would take and actually kill the child, she took it away and hid it where she thought it would be hardest to find, in a chest, for she knew that if they returned and set about searching they would seek in every place—which in fact they did. ,They came and searched, but when they did not find it, they resolved to go off and say to those who had sent them that they had carried out their orders. They then went away and said this. ,Eetion's son, however, grew up, and because of his escape from that danger, he was called Cypselus, after the chest. When he had reached manhood and was seeking a divination, an oracle of double meaning was given him at Delphi. Putting faith in this, he made an attempt on Corinth and won it. ,The oracle was as follows: quote type="oracle" l met="dact"That man is fortunate who steps into my house, /l l Cypselus, son of Eetion, the king of noble Corinth, /l lHe himself and his children, but not the sons of his sons. /l /quote Such was the oracle. Cypselus, however, when he had gained the tyranny, conducted himself in this way: many of the Corinthians he drove into exile, many he deprived of their wealth, and by far the most he had killed. ,After a reign of thirty years, he died in the height of prosperity, and was succeeded by his son Periander. Now Periander was to begin with milder than his father, but after he had held converse by messenger with Thrasybulus the tyrant of Miletus, he became much more bloodthirsty than Cypselus. ,He had sent a herald to Thrasybulus and inquired in what way he would best and most safely govern his city. Thrasybulus led the man who had come from Periander outside the town, and entered into a sown field. As he walked through the corn, continually asking why the messenger had come to him from Corinth, he kept cutting off all the tallest ears of wheat which he could see, and throwing them away, until he had destroyed the best and richest part of the crop. ,Then, after passing through the place and speaking no word of counsel, he sent the herald away. When the herald returned to Corinth, Periander desired to hear what counsel he brought, but the man said that Thrasybulus had given him none. The herald added that it was a strange man to whom he had been sent, a madman and a destroyer of his own possessions, telling Periander what he had seen Thrasybulus do. ,Periander, however, understood what had been done, and perceived that Thrasybulus had counselled him to slay those of his townsmen who were outstanding in influence or ability; with that he began to deal with his citizens in an evil manner. Whatever act of slaughter or banishment Cypselus had left undone, that Periander brought to accomplishment. In a single day he stripped all the women of Corinth naked, because of his own wife Melissa. ,Periander had sent messengers to the Oracle of the Dead on the river Acheron in Thesprotia to enquire concerning a deposit that a friend had left, but Melissa, in an apparition, said that she would tell him nothing, nor reveal where the deposit lay, for she was cold and naked. The garments, she said, with which Periander had buried with her had never been burnt, and were of no use to her. Then, as evidence for her husband that she spoke the truth, she added that Periander had put his loaves into a cold oven. ,When this message was brought back to Periander (for he had had intercourse with the dead body of Melissa and knew her token for true), immediately after the message he made a proclamation that all the Corinthian women should come out into the temple of Hera. They then came out as to a festival, wearing their most beautiful garments, and Periander set his guards there and stripped them all alike, ladies and serving-women, and heaped all the clothes in a pit, where, as he prayed to Melissa, he burnt them. ,When he had done this and sent a second message, the ghost of Melissa told him where the deposit of the friend had been laid. “This, then, Lacedaimonians, is the nature of tyranny, and such are its deeds. ,We Corinthians marvelled greatly when we saw that you were sending for Hippias, and now we marvel yet more at your words to us. We entreat you earnestly in the name of the gods of Hellas not to establish tyranny in the cities, but if you do not cease from so doing and unrighteously attempt to bring Hippias back, be assured that you are proceeding without the Corinthians' consent.” 9.7. The Lacedaemonians were at this time celebrating the festival of Hyacinthus, and their chief concern was to give the god his due; moreover, the wall which they were building on the Isthmus was by now getting its battlements. When the Athenian envoys arrived in Lacedaemon, bringing with them envoys from Megara and Plataea, they came before the ephors and said: ,“The Athenians have sent us with this message: the king of the Medes is ready to give us back our country, and to make us his confederates, equal in right and standing, in all honor and honesty, and to give us whatever land we ourselves may choose besides our own. ,But we, since we do not want to sin against Zeus the god of Hellas and think it shameful to betray Hellas, have not consented. This we have done despite the fact that the Greeks are dealing with us wrongfully and betraying us to our hurt; furthermore, we know that it is more to our advantage to make terms with the Persians than to wage war with him, yet we will not make terms with him of our own free will. For our part, we act honestly by the Greeks; ,but what of you, who once were in great dread lest we should make terms with the Persian? Now that you have a clear idea of our sentiments and are sure that we will never betray Hellas, and now that the wall which you are building across the Isthmus is nearly finished, you take no account of the Athenians, but have deserted us despite all your promises that you would withstand the Persian in Boeotia, and have permitted the barbarian to march into Attica. ,For the present, then, the Athenians are angry with you since you have acted in a manner unworthy of you. Now they ask you to send with us an army with all speed, so that we may await the foreigner's onset in Attica; since we have lost Boeotia, in our own territory the most suitable place for a battle is the Thriasian plain.”
20. Plato, Euthyphro, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6b. Euthyphro. Yes, and still more wonderful things than these, Socrates, which most people do not know. Socrates. And so you believe that there was really war between the gods, and fearful enmities and battles and other things of the sort, such as are told of by the poets and represented in varied design
21. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

500b. that there were certain industries, some of which extend only to pleasure, procuring that and no more, and ignorant of better and worse; while others know what is good and what bad. And I placed among those that are concerned with pleasure the habitude, not art, of cookery, and among those concerned with good the art of medicine. Now by the sanctity of friendship, Callicles, do not on your part indulge in jesting with me, or give me random answers against your conviction, or again, take what I say as though I were jesting. For you see
22. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

700b. one class of song was that of prayers to the gods, which bore the name of hymns ; contrasted with this was another class, best called dirges ; paeans formed another; and yet another was the dithyramb, named, I fancy, after Dionysus. Nomes also were so called as being a distinct class of song; and these were further described as citharoedic nomes. So these and other kinds being classified and fixed, it was forbidden to set one kind of words to a different class of tune.
23. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

244a. that the former discourse was by Phaedrus, the son of Pythocles (Eager for Fame) of Myrrhinus (Myrrhtown); but this which I shall speak is by Stesichorus, son of Euphemus (Man of pious Speech) of Himera (Town of Desire). And I must say that this saying is not true, which teaches that when a lover is at hand the non-lover should be more favored, because the lover is insane, and the other sane. For if it were a simple fact that insanity is an evil, the saying would be true; but in reality the greatest of blessings come to us through madness, when it is sent as a gift of the gods. For the prophetess at Delphi
24. Sophocles, Ajax, 492 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

25. Sophocles, Antigone, 1116-1152, 1115 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

26. Sophocles, Philoctetes, 484, 1324 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

27. Aristotle, Poetics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

28. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.1125-1.1151 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.1125. μητέρα Δινδυμίην πολυπότνιαν ἀγκαλέοντες 1.1126. ἐνναέτιν Φρυγίης, Τιτίην θʼ ἅμα Κύλληνόν τε 1.1127. οἳ μοῦνοι πολέων μοιρηγέται ἠδὲ πάρεδροι 1.1128. μητέρος Ἰδαίης κεκλήαται, ὅσσοι ἔασιν 1.1129. δάκτυλοι Ἰδαῖοι Κρηταιέες, οὕς ποτε νύμφη 1.1130. Ἀγχιάλη Δικταῖον ἀνὰ σπέος ἀμφοτέρῃσιν 1.1131. δραξαμένη γαίης Οἰαξίδος ἐβλάστησεν. 1.1132. πολλὰ δὲ τήνγε λιτῇσιν ἀποστρέψαι ἐριώλας 1.1133. Λἰσονίδης γουνάζετʼ ἐπιλλείβων ἱεροῖσιν 1.1134. αἰθομένοις· ἄμυδις δὲ νέοι Ὀρφῆος ἀνωγῇ 1.1135. σκαίροντες βηταρμὸν ἐνόπλιον ὠρχήσαντο 1.1136. καὶ σάκεα ξιφέεσσιν ἐπέκτυπον, ὥς κεν ἰωὴ 1.1137. δύσφημος πλάζοιτο διʼ ἠέρος, ἣν ἔτι λαοὶ 1.1138. κηδείῃ βασιλῆος ἀνέστενον. ἔνθεν ἐσαιεὶ 1.1139. ῥόμβῳ καὶ τυπάνῳ Ῥείην Φρύγες ἱλάσκονται. 1.1140. ἡ δέ που εὐαγέεσσιν ἐπὶ φρένα θῆκε θυηλαῖς 1.1141. ἀνταίη δαίμων· τὰ δʼ ἐοικότα σήματʼ ἔγεντο. 1.1142. δένδρεα μὲν καρπὸν χέον ἄσπετον, ἀμφὶ δὲ ποσσὶν 1.1143. αὐτομάτη φύε γαῖα τερείνης ἄνθεα ποίης. 1.1144. θῆρες δʼ εἰλυούς τε κατὰ ξυλόχους τε λιπόντες 1.1145. οὐρῇσιν σαίνοντες ἐπήλυθον. ἡ δὲ καὶ ἄλλο 1.1146. θῆκε τέρας· ἐπεὶ οὔτι παροίτερον ὕδατι νᾶεν 1.1147. Δίνδυμον· ἀλλά σφιν τότʼ ἀνέβραχε διψάδος αὔτως 1.1148. ἐκ κορυφῆς ἄλληκτον· Ἰησονίην δʼ ἐνέπουσιν 1.1149. κεῖνο ποτὸν κρήνην περιναιέται ἄνδρες ὀπίσσω. 1.1150. καὶ τότε μὲν δαῖτʼ ἀμφὶ θεᾶς θέσαν οὔρεσιν Ἄρκτων 1.1151. μέλποντες Ῥείην πολυπότνιαν· αὐτὰρ ἐς ἠὼ
29. Catullus, Poems, 64.251-64.252, 64.261, 64.264 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

30. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 4.3.2-4.3.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.3.2.  And the Boeotians and other Greeks and the Thracians, in memory of the campaign in India, have established sacrifices every other year to Dionysus, and believe that at that time the god reveals himself to human beings. 4.3.3.  Consequently in many Greek cities every other year Bacchic bands of women gather, and it is lawful for the maidens to carry the thyrsus and to join in the frenzied revelry, crying out "Euai!" and honouring the god; while the matrons, forming in groups, offer sacrifices to the god and celebrate his mysteries and, in general, extol with hymns the presence of Dionysus, in this manner acting the part of the Maenads who, as history records, were of old the companions of the god.
31. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 2.618-2.620 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

32. Ovid, Fasti, 4.189, 4.207, 5.441 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4.189. I’d like to ask many things, but I’m made fearful 4.207. Now steep Ida echoed to a jingling music 5.441. He says this nine times without looking back: the shade
33. Vergil, Aeneis, 9.617-9.618 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9.617. hall blot your names from honor's storied scroll: 9.618. not while the altars of Aeneas' line
34. Cornutus, De Natura Deorum, 9, 30 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

35. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 1.39 (1st cent. CE

36. Plutarch, Lycurgus, 6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

37. Seneca The Younger, On Leisure, 17.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

38. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.18.9, 1.24.4, 1.44.9, 2.7.5-2.7.6, 2.29.8, 2.30.3, 5.24.9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.18.9. Hadrian constructed other buildings also for the Athenians: a temple of Hera and Zeus Panellenios (Common to all Greeks), a sanctuary common to all the gods, and, most famous of all, a hundred pillars of Phrygian marble. The walls too are constructed of the same material as the cloisters. And there are rooms there adorned with a gilded roof and with alabaster stone, as well as with statues and paintings. In them are kept books. There is also a gymnasium named after Hadrian; of this too the pillars are a hundred in number from the Libyan quarries. 1.24.4. and there are statues of Zeus, one made by Leochares See Paus. 1.1.3 . and one called Polieus (Urban), the customary mode of sacrificing to whom I will give without adding the traditional reason thereof. Upon the altar of Zeus Polieus they place barley mixed with wheat and leave it unguarded. The ox, which they keep already prepared for sacrifice, goes to the altar and partakes of the grain. One of the priests they call the ox-slayer, who kills the ox and then, casting aside the axe here according to the ritual runs away. The others bring the axe to trial, as though they know not the man who did the deed. 1.44.9. On the top of the mountain is a temple of Zeus surnamed Aphesius (Releaser). It is said that on the occasion of the drought that once afflicted the Greeks Aeacus in obedience to an oracular utterance sacrificed in Aegina to Zeus God of all the Greeks, and Zeus rained and ended the drought, gaining thus the name Aphesius. Here there are also images of Aphrodite, Apollo, and Pan. 2.7.5. On the modern citadel is a sanctuary of Fortune of the Height, and after it one of the Dioscuri. Their images and that of Fortune are of wood. On the stage of the theater built under the citadel is a statue of a man with a shield, who they say is Aratus, the son of Cleinias. After the theater is a temple of Dionysus. The god is of gold and ivory, and by his side are Bacchanals of white marble. These women they say are sacred to Dionysus and maddened by his inspiration. The Sicyonians have also some images which are kept secret. These one night in each year they carry to the temple of Dionysus from what they call the Cosmeterium (Tiring-room), and they do so with lighted torches and native hymns. 2.7.6. The first is the one named Baccheus, set up by Androdamas, the son of Phlias, and this is followed by the one called Lysius (Deliverer), brought from Thebes by the Theban Phanes at the command of the Pythian priestess. Phanes came to Sicyon when Aristomachus, the son of Cleodaeus, failed to understand the oracle I To wait for “the third fruit,” i.e. the third generation. It was interpreted to mean the third year. given him, and therefore failed to return to the Peloponnesus . As you walk from the temple of Dionysus to the market-place you see on the right a temple of Artemis of the lake. A look shows that the roof has fallen in, but the inhabitants cannot tell whether the image has been removed or how it was destroyed on the spot. 2.29.8. And so envoys came with a request to Aeacus from each city. By sacrifice and prayer to Zeus, God of all the Greeks (Panellenios), he caused rain to fall upon the earth, and the Aeginetans made these likenesses of those who came to him. Within the enclosure are olive trees that have grown there from of old, and there is an altar which is raised but a little from the ground. That this altar is also the tomb of Aeacus is told as a holy secret. 2.30.3. In Aegina, as you go towards the mountain of Zeus, God of all the Greeks, you reach a sanctuary of Aphaea, in whose honor Pindar composed an ode for the Aeginetans. The Cretans say (the story of Aphaea is Cretan) that Carmanor, who purified Apollo after he had killed Pytho, was the father of Eubulus, and that the daughter of Zeus and of Carme, the daughter of Eubulus, was Britomartis. She took delight, they say, in running and in the chase, and was very dear to Artemis. Fleeing from Minos, who had fallen in love with her, she threw herself into nets which had been cast (aphemena) for a draught of fishes. She was made a goddess by Artemis, and she is worshipped, not only by the Cretans, but also by the Aeginetans, who say that Britomartis shows herself in their island. Her surname among the Aeginetans is Aphaea; in Crete it is Dictynna (Goddess of Nets). 5.24.9. But the Zeus in the Council Chamber is of all the images of Zeus the one most likely to strike terror into the hearts of sinners. He is surnamed Oath-god, and in each hand he holds a thunderbolt. Beside this image it is the custom for athletes, their fathers and their brothers, as well as their trainers, to swear an oath upon slices of boar's flesh that in nothing will they sin against the Olympic games. The athletes take this further oath also, that for ten successive months they have strictly followed the regulations for training.
39. Epigraphy, Ig, 12.3.402



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
afterlife Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
agave Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 146
anger (orgē) Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 221
anti-hero, dionysus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
antigone Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 111, 112
antithesis Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 221
apollo Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 111
asia, asian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
athena, athena ellenios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
athena Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
attis, in rome Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 295
attis Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 295
bacchants, bacchae, bacchai Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 171
baccheia βακχεία Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
bacchus, bacchius Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46, 50
bacchus Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 221
bassaras, bassarides, bassarae Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
bull Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
cattle Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
chora Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 109, 110, 111, 112
choregos Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 110
choreia Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 109, 111
choros Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 111
chorus, in drama Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
chorus (male, female), of a. edonoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
chorus (male, female), of christus patiens Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 146
chorus leader Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 110
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50, 162
chronotope Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 109, 112
cithaeron Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 109; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
context/environment/milieu, socio-cultural, ideological Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 146
cotys Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
countryside Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 110
cry, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 171
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46, 162
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15, 146, 159
cybele Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
cymbal Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 295
dance, dancing, ecstatic, frenzied, maenadic, orgiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
dance, dancing Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
death Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 111, 112
delirium Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50, 171
delphi Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 110; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 159
demeter, and kore (persephone) Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
demeter Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
dindymene Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
dionysia, great and rural (festivals) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
dionysos, and kybele Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 295
dionysos, dionysos baccheios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
dionysos, dionysos baccheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
dionysos, dionysos bacchios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46, 50
dionysos, dionysos bacchos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
dionysos, dionysos bassareus/bassaros Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
dionysos, dionysos bromios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
dionysos, dionysos liberator Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
dionysos, dionysos lyaios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
dionysos, dionysos lyseus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
dionysos, dionysos lysios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
dionysos, gift Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
dionysos, punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46, 50, 162, 171
dionysus, as an epiphanic/visible god Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 159
dionysus, hellenization of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 159
dionysus, lysios Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 159
dionysus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 109, 110, 111, 112; Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 221
dismemberment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 171
dithyramb, language of Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 157
earth (gaea), as demeter Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
earth (gaea) Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50, 162, 171
eleusis Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 111
epiphany Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 110
euripides, bacchae Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 157; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 159
euripides, on the mother of the gods Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
evohé εὐαί, εὐαἵ, εὐοἷ Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 171
fawn Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
fear Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 221
female Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
flute Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 171
frenzy, frenzied Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50, 171
gift Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
goat Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
hades Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 112
hellenistic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 171
heracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
hero Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
hesiod Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
homer Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
homeric hymn, to earth Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
iacchus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 111
ida, idaean mother Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
ida Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
initiands/initiates/initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
initiate Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
inspiration Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
jesus christ Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 146
kadmos, kadmeian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
kybebe/le, and dionysos Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 295
kybebe/le, and music Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 295
kybebe/le Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 295
liberation Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46, 50, 171
light Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 111
lydia and lydians, and phrygian symbols Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
lydia and lydians, rites of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
madness Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46, 50
madness (mania)/frenzy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15, 146
maenad-nymphs Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 171
maenads, maenadic, maenadism, rites/cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50, 162, 171
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50, 162, 171
maenads/maenadism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 146
maenads Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 295; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
mater magna Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 295
messenger Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
miracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
mise en abyme Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 109, 111
mother of the gods, and animals Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
mother of the gods, as demeter Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
mother of the gods, as earth (gaea) Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
mother of the gods, as mountain mother Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
mother of the gods, as rhea Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
mother of the gods, associated with mountains Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
mother of the gods, daughter of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
mother of the gods, great Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
mother of the gods, in attic drama Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
mother of the gods, multiple identities of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
mountains Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50, 171
mysteries, mystery cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
mystery Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
mystic Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 111
mystic initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 171
nebris νεβρίς Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
night, nocturnal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46, 50, 162
nymph Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 171
oreibasia ὀρειβασία Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46, 50
orgia ὄργια Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
parnassus, parnassian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
parnassus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 159
parodos, of bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15, 146
parodos, of edonoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
pentheus Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 221
performance Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46; Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 109
performativity Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 109
persephone Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
pessinous Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 295
polis Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 110
presence Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 112
procession Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46, 50
procession (pompe) Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 109, 111
punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
purification Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
reception, of dramatic situations and themes Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 146, 159
resemblances, edonoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
resemblances, reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 146, 159
resemblances Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
rhea Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
rite, ritual, maenadic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50, 162, 171
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46, 50, 162, 171
rome, roman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
semele Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 110; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
sex, sexuality Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
sicyon, sicyonian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
sparagmos Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
tambourine Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 295
teiresias Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50, 162; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 159
temple Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
thebes Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 109, 110, 111
thebes (boeotia) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
theotokos (mother of god), and the chorus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 146, 159
theotokos (mother of god), laments of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 146
thera Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
thiasos θίασος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46, 162
thrace Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
thyrsus θύρσος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
tibia Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 295
tragedy, origins of Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 157
tragedy, tragic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46, 50, 162, 171
trance Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 171
tyrannus, philoctetes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
variations Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 146
violence/violent Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
war Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 221
wine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50, 162
woman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50, 162, 171
women Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112; Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 221
worship Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46, 171
worshippers' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
zeus, and gaea Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
zeus, and rhea Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
zeus, zeus epistios/ephestios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
zeus, zeus hellenios/panhellenios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
zeus, zeus hetaireios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
zeus, zeus ikesios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
zeus, zeus orkios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
zeus, zeus philios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
zeus, zeus polieus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
zeus, zeus xeinios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46
zeus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 46; Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 111; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56