Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5614
Euripides, Bacchae, 1077


καὶ τὸν ξένον μὲν οὐκέτʼ εἰσορᾶν παρῆνHe was seen by the Maenads more than he saw them, for sitting on high he was all but apparent, and the stranger was no longer anywhere to be seen, when a voice, Dionysus as I guess, cried out from the air: Young women


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

19 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.130-6.140 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.130. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.131. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.132. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.133. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.134. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.135. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.136. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.137. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.138. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.139. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.140. /and he lived not for long, seeing that he was hated of all the immortal gods. So would not I be minded to fight against the blessed gods. But if thou art of men, who eat the fruit of the field, draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. Then spake to him the glorious son of Hippolochus:
2. Homer, Odyssey, 9.270-9.271, 17.483-17.487 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Homeric Hymns, To Demeter, 189 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

189. In our fine house, she has a late-born son
4. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 441-445, 440 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)

440. In their black ship to trade with Pylian men.
5. Hymn To Apollo, To Apollo, 441-445, 440 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

6. Hymn To Apollo (Homeric Hymn 21), To Apollo, 441-445, 440 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

7. Aeschylus, Persians, 354 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

354. φανεὶς ἀλάστωρ ἢ κακὸς δαίμων ποθέν.
8. Anacreon, Fragments, 357 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Anacreon, Fragments, 357 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 42, 985-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. εὐπέταλος ἕλικι θάλλει.
11. Euripides, Bacchae, 1000-1009, 101, 1010-1019, 102, 1020-1029, 103, 1030-1039, 104, 1040-1049, 105, 1050-1059, 106, 1060-1069, 107, 1070-1076, 1078-1079, 108, 1080-1089, 109, 1090-1099, 110, 1100-1109, 111, 1110-1119, 112, 1120-1129, 113, 1130-1139, 114, 1140-1149, 115, 1150-1155, 116, 1166, 117-118, 1189, 119, 1190-1192, 120-123, 1239, 124, 1240, 125, 1250, 126-129, 1293, 1296, 130, 1302, 131-166, 233, 247, 263, 31-35, 352, 36-40, 441, 443-450, 453, 507, 576-639, 64, 640-649, 65, 650-656, 66, 667, 67, 677-679, 68, 680-689, 69, 690-699, 70, 700-709, 71, 710-719, 72, 720-729, 73, 730-739, 74, 740-749, 75, 750-759, 76, 760-769, 77, 770-774, 778-779, 78, 780-789, 79, 790-795, 80, 800, 81-91, 918-919, 92, 920-929, 93, 930-939, 94, 940-949, 95, 950-959, 96, 960-969, 97, 970-979, 98, 980-989, 99, 990-999, 100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. τέλεσαν, ταυρόκερων θεὸν 100. had perfected him, the bull-horned god, and he crowned him with crowns of snakes, for which reason Maenads cloak their wild prey over their locks. Choru
12. Herodotus, Histories, 8.37 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8.37. Now when the barbarians drew near and could see the temple, the prophet, whose name was Aceratus, saw certain sacred arms, which no man might touch without sacrilege, brought out of the chamber within and laid before the shrine. ,So he went to tell the Delphians of this miracle, but when the barbarians came with all speed near to the temple of Athena Pronaea, they were visited by miracles yet greater than the aforesaid. Marvellous indeed it is, that weapons of war should of their own motion appear lying outside in front of the shrine, but the visitation which followed was more wondrous than anything else ever seen. ,When the barbarians were near to the temple of Athena Pronaea, they were struck by thunderbolts from the sky, and two peaks broken off from Parnassus came rushing among them with a mighty noise and overwhelmed many of them. In addition to this a shout and a cry of triumph were heard from the temple of Athena.
13. Sophocles, Ajax, 464 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Sophocles, Antigone, 1116-1152, 1115 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 26.4 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

16. New Testament, Acts, 1.18, 9.1, 9.13, 9.16, 9.23-9.24 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.18. Now this man obtained a field with the reward for his wickedness, and falling headlong, his body burst open, and all his intestines gushed out. 9.1. But Saul, still breathing threats and slaughter against the disciples of the Lord, went to the high priest 9.13. But Aias answered, "Lord, I have heard from many about this man, how much evil he did to your saints at Jerusalem. 9.16. For I will show him how many things he must suffer for my name's sake. 9.23. When many days were fulfilled, the Jews conspired together to kill him 9.24. but their plot became known to Saul. They watched the gates both day and night that they might kill him
17. Plutarch, Camillus, 5.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.2. From the sacred rites used in the worship of this goddess, she might be held to be almost identical with Leucothea. The women bring a serving-maid into the sanctuary and beat her with rods, then drive her forth again; they embrace their nephews and nieces in preference to their own children; and their conduct at the sacrifice resembles that of the nurses of Dionysus, or that of Ino under the afflictions put upon her by her husband’s concubine. After his vows, Camillus invaded the country of the Faliscans and conquered them in a great battle, together with the Capenates who came up to their aid.
18. Plutarch, Pericles, 37 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. Plutarch, Themistocles, 15 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adaptation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 141
agave Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127, 133, 148
anti-hero, dionysus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
apollo, apollonian, apolline Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 346
archaic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53, 302
athens, athenian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 302
bacchants, bacchae, bacchai Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53, 161, 346
baccheia βακχεία Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53
bacchus, bacchius Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53
bacchus, βάκχος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53
bull Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
calvary Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 133
chorus, in drama Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53, 302
cithaeron Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127, 133, 136
classical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53, 302
comedy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 302
conversion, paul Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 261
conversion, vision or dream Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 261
crastonia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 346
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161, 302, 346
dance, dancing Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53
demeter Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 346
dionysia, great and rural (festivals) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
dionysos, arrival Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysos, awakening Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysos, dionysos as hunter Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53
dionysos, dionysos bacchios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53
dionysos, dionysos bacchos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53
dionysos, dionysos bromios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53, 161
dionysos, dionysos euios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53
dionysos, dionysos xenos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 302
dionysos, epiphany Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 346
dionysos, nurse of Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysos, punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53, 161
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53, 161, 302, 346
dismemberment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
divine speech, enigmatic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 261
double dreams and visions, peter and cornelius, apologetic agendas Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 335
double dreams and visions, peter and cornelius, peter-paul parallel Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 335
double dreams and visions, peter and cornelius Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 335
dream imagery, dionysiac Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 261, 335
earth, earthly Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 346
ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
epic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 302
euripides, bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 136, 148
euripides, exodos (missing part/lacuna) of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 136, 148
euripides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 148
female Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53
fire Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 346
gospels Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 133
hamartia Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127
heaven, heavenly Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 346
hellenistic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
heracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
hero Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
homeric Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 302
ino Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
ivy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
jesus christ, and dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 136
jesus christ Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 133, 136, 141
joseph of arimathea Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 148
judas, and pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 141
kithairon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53
lightning Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 346
madness Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53
madness (mania)/frenzy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127, 148
maenad-nymphs Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
maenads, maenadic, maenadism, rites/cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53, 161
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53, 161
maenads/maenadism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127, 136, 148
maenads Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
magic, magical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 302
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 346
mantis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 302
melitaia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
messenger Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
messengers/messenger-speech Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127, 133, 136
miracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
murder, murderous Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53
mystic, mystical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 302
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
nereids Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 346
nymph Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
nysa, nyseion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
parnassus, parnassian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 346
pentheus, death Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 346
pentheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53, 302, 346; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127, 133, 136, 141, 148
pericles Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 302
pity (ἔλεος) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127, 148
polis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 302
pottery Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53, 161, 346
punning derivation (of names) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 141
reception, of dramatic conventions Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127
reception, of dramatic situations and themes Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 133, 136, 141, 148
reconfiguration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 136
redemption Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 136
resemblances, reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127, 133, 136, 141, 148
resemblances Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 133, 148
rite, ritual, maenadic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53, 161
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 346
rome, roman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
sacrifice, sacrificial Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 346
sanctuary Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 346
semele Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
sparagmos/dismemberment Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127, 133, 136, 141, 148
sparagmos Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161, 346
thebes (boeotia) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
theotokos (mother of god) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 133, 136, 148
thyrsos (–oi) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127
thyrsus θύρσος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53
tragedy, tragic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 346
vegetation Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 346
violence/violent Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53
woman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161, 346
women Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
worship Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53
worshippers' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 53
xenia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 302
zeus, zeus xeinios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 302
zeus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 302