Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5614
Euripides, Bacchae, 1043-1099


ἐπεὶ θεράπνας τῆσδε Θηβαίας χθονὸςSECOND MESSENGER Soon as we had left the homesteads of this Theban land and had crossed the streams of Asopus, we began to breast Cithaeron's heights, Pentheus and I, for I went with my master, and the stranger too, who was to guide us to the scene. First then we sat us down in a grassy glen, carefully silencing each footfall and whispered breath, to see without being seen. Now there was a dell walled in by rocks, with rills to water it, and shady pines o'erhead; there were the Maenads seated, busied with joyous toils. Some were wreathing afresh the drooping thyrsus with curling ivy-sprays; others, like colts let loose from the carved chariot-yoke, were answering each other in hymns of Bacchic rapture. But Pentheus, son of sorrow, seeing not the women gathered there, exclaimed, "Sir stranger, from where I stand, I cannot clearly see the mock Bacchantes; but I will climb a hillock or a soaring pine whence to see clearly the shameful doings of the Bacchanals." Then and there I saw the stranger work a miracle; for catching a lofty fir-branch by the very end he drew it downward to the dusky earth, lower yet and ever lower; and like a bow it bent, or rounded wheel, whose curving circle grows complete, as chalk and line describe it; e'en so the stranger drew down the mountain-branch between his hands, bending it to earth, by more than human agency.


ἐπεὶ θεράπνας τῆσδε Θηβαίας χθονὸςWhen we left the dwellings of the Theban land and crossed the streams of Asopus


λιπόντες ἐξέβημεν Ἀσωποῦ ῥοάςWhen we left the dwellings of the Theban land and crossed the streams of Asopus


λέπας Κιθαιρώνειον εἰσεβάλλομενwe began to ascend the heights of Kithairon, Pentheus and I—for I was following my master—and the stranger who was our guide to the sight. First we sat in a grassy vale


Πενθεύς τε κἀγώ—δεσπότῃ γὰρ εἱπόμην—we began to ascend the heights of Kithairon, Pentheus and I—for I was following my master—and the stranger who was our guide to the sight. First we sat in a grassy vale


ξένος θʼ ὃς ἡμῖν πομπὸς ἦν θεωρίας.we began to ascend the heights of Kithairon, Pentheus and I—for I was following my master—and the stranger who was our guide to the sight. First we sat in a grassy vale


nanwe began to ascend the heights of Kithairon, Pentheus and I—for I was following my master—and the stranger who was our guide to the sight. First we sat in a grassy vale


τά τʼ ἐκ ποδῶν σιγηλὰ καὶ γλώσσης ἄποwe began to ascend the heights of Kithairon, Pentheus and I—for I was following my master—and the stranger who was our guide to the sight. First we sat in a grassy vale


σῴζοντες, ὡς ὁρῷμεν οὐχ ὁρώμενοι.keeping our feet and voices quiet, so that we might see them without being seen. There was a little valley surounded by precipices, irrigated with streams, shaded by pine trees, where the Maenads were sitting, their hands busy with delightful labors. Some of them were crowning again


ἦν δʼ ἄγκος ἀμφίκρημνον, ὕδασι διάβροχονkeeping our feet and voices quiet, so that we might see them without being seen. There was a little valley surounded by precipices, irrigated with streams, shaded by pine trees, where the Maenads were sitting, their hands busy with delightful labors. Some of them were crowning again


πεύκαισι συσκιάζον, ἔνθα μαινάδεςkeeping our feet and voices quiet, so that we might see them without being seen. There was a little valley surounded by precipices, irrigated with streams, shaded by pine trees, where the Maenads were sitting, their hands busy with delightful labors. Some of them were crowning again


καθῆντʼ ἔχουσαι χεῖρας ἐν τερπνοῖς πόνοις.keeping our feet and voices quiet, so that we might see them without being seen. There was a little valley surounded by precipices, irrigated with streams, shaded by pine trees, where the Maenads were sitting, their hands busy with delightful labors. Some of them were crowning again


αἳ μὲν γὰρ αὐτῶν θύρσον ἐκλελοιπόταkeeping our feet and voices quiet, so that we might see them without being seen. There was a little valley surounded by precipices, irrigated with streams, shaded by pine trees, where the Maenads were sitting, their hands busy with delightful labors. Some of them were crowning again


κισσῷ κομήτην αὖθις ἐξανέστεφονthe worn thyrsos, making it leafy with ivy, while some, like colts freed from the painted yoke, were singing a Bacchic melody to one another. And the unhappy Pentheus said, not seeing the crowd of women: Stranger


αἳ δʼ, ἐκλιποῦσαι ποικίλʼ ὡς πῶλοι ζυγάthe worn thyrsos, making it leafy with ivy, while some, like colts freed from the painted yoke, were singing a Bacchic melody to one another. And the unhappy Pentheus said, not seeing the crowd of women: Stranger


βακχεῖον ἀντέκλαζον ἀλλήλαις μέλος.the worn thyrsos, making it leafy with ivy, while some, like colts freed from the painted yoke, were singing a Bacchic melody to one another. And the unhappy Pentheus said, not seeing the crowd of women: Stranger


Πενθεὺς δʼ ὁ τλήμων θῆλυν οὐχ ὁρῶν ὄχλονthe worn thyrsos, making it leafy with ivy, while some, like colts freed from the painted yoke, were singing a Bacchic melody to one another. And the unhappy Pentheus said, not seeing the crowd of women: Stranger


ἔλεξε τοιάδʼ· Ὦ ξένʼ, οὗ μὲν ἕσταμενthe worn thyrsos, making it leafy with ivy, while some, like colts freed from the painted yoke, were singing a Bacchic melody to one another. And the unhappy Pentheus said, not seeing the crowd of women: Stranger


οὐκ ἐξικνοῦμαι μαινάδων ὄσσοις νόθων·from where we are standing I cannot see these false Maenads. But on the hill, ascending a lofty pine, I might view properly the shameful acts of the Maenads. And then I saw the stranger perform a marvelous deed. For seizing hold of the lofty top-most branch of the pine tree


ὄχθων δʼ ἔπʼ, ἀμβὰς ἐς ἐλάτην ὑψαύχεναfrom where we are standing I cannot see these false Maenads. But on the hill, ascending a lofty pine, I might view properly the shameful acts of the Maenads. And then I saw the stranger perform a marvelous deed. For seizing hold of the lofty top-most branch of the pine tree


ἴδοιμʼ ἂν ὀρθῶς μαινάδων αἰσχρουργίαν.from where we are standing I cannot see these false Maenads. But on the hill, ascending a lofty pine, I might view properly the shameful acts of the Maenads. And then I saw the stranger perform a marvelous deed. For seizing hold of the lofty top-most branch of the pine tree


nanfrom where we are standing I cannot see these false Maenads. But on the hill, ascending a lofty pine, I might view properly the shameful acts of the Maenads. And then I saw the stranger perform a marvelous deed. For seizing hold of the lofty top-most branch of the pine tree


λαβὼν γὰρ ἐλάτης οὐράνιον ἄκρον κλάδονfrom where we are standing I cannot see these false Maenads. But on the hill, ascending a lofty pine, I might view properly the shameful acts of the Maenads. And then I saw the stranger perform a marvelous deed. For seizing hold of the lofty top-most branch of the pine tree


κατῆγεν, ἦγεν, ἦγεν ἐς μέλαν πέδον·he pulled it down, pulled it, pulled it to the dark earth. It was bent just as a bow or a curved wheel, when it is marked out by a compass, describes a circular course The sense of the text here is not clear. The translation (which follows Dodds) assumes that the curved wheel is not a hollow circle connected to the hub by spokes, but a single piece of wood which has been cut into the shape of a circle. In the action described, a peg ( τόρνος ) is fixed into the center of the word-section. A string with a piece of chalk on one end is then attached to the peg, and the chalk, held tight against the string, is able to mark out an even circle. The bending of the tree thus resembles the circular path taken by the chalk. : in this way the stranger drew the mountain bough with his hands and bent it to the earth, doing no mortal’s deed.


κυκλοῦτο δʼ ὥστε τόξον ἢ κυρτὸς τροχὸςhe pulled it down, pulled it, pulled it to the dark earth. It was bent just as a bow or a curved wheel, when it is marked out by a compass, describes a circular course The sense of the text here is not clear. The translation (which follows Dodds) assumes that the curved wheel is not a hollow circle connected to the hub by spokes, but a single piece of wood which has been cut into the shape of a circle. In the action described, a peg ( τόρνος ) is fixed into the center of the word-section. A string with a piece of chalk on one end is then attached to the peg, and the chalk, held tight against the string, is able to mark out an even circle. The bending of the tree thus resembles the circular path taken by the chalk. : in this way the stranger drew the mountain bough with his hands and bent it to the earth, doing no mortal’s deed.


τόρνῳ γραφόμενος περιφορὰν ἕλκει δρόμον·he pulled it down, pulled it, pulled it to the dark earth. It was bent just as a bow or a curved wheel, when it is marked out by a compass, describes a circular course The sense of the text here is not clear. The translation (which follows Dodds) assumes that the curved wheel is not a hollow circle connected to the hub by spokes, but a single piece of wood which has been cut into the shape of a circle. In the action described, a peg ( τόρνος ) is fixed into the center of the word-section. A string with a piece of chalk on one end is then attached to the peg, and the chalk, held tight against the string, is able to mark out an even circle. The bending of the tree thus resembles the circular path taken by the chalk. : in this way the stranger drew the mountain bough with his hands and bent it to the earth, doing no mortal’s deed.


ὣς κλῶνʼ ὄρειον ὁ ξένος χεροῖν ἄγωνhe pulled it down, pulled it, pulled it to the dark earth. It was bent just as a bow or a curved wheel, when it is marked out by a compass, describes a circular course The sense of the text here is not clear. The translation (which follows Dodds) assumes that the curved wheel is not a hollow circle connected to the hub by spokes, but a single piece of wood which has been cut into the shape of a circle. In the action described, a peg ( τόρνος ) is fixed into the center of the word-section. A string with a piece of chalk on one end is then attached to the peg, and the chalk, held tight against the string, is able to mark out an even circle. The bending of the tree thus resembles the circular path taken by the chalk. : in this way the stranger drew the mountain bough with his hands and bent it to the earth, doing no mortal’s deed.


ἔκαμπτεν ἐς γῆν, ἔργματʼ οὐχὶ θνητὰ δρῶν.he pulled it down, pulled it, pulled it to the dark earth. It was bent just as a bow or a curved wheel, when it is marked out by a compass, describes a circular course The sense of the text here is not clear. The translation (which follows Dodds) assumes that the curved wheel is not a hollow circle connected to the hub by spokes, but a single piece of wood which has been cut into the shape of a circle. In the action described, a peg ( τόρνος ) is fixed into the center of the word-section. A string with a piece of chalk on one end is then attached to the peg, and the chalk, held tight against the string, is able to mark out an even circle. The bending of the tree thus resembles the circular path taken by the chalk. : in this way the stranger drew the mountain bough with his hands and bent it to the earth, doing no mortal’s deed.


Πενθέα δʼ ἱδρύσας ἐλατίνων ὄζων ἔπιAnd when he had seated Pentheus aloft on the pine branches, he let them slip through his hands gently, careful not to shake him from his seat. Up soared the branch straight into the air above, with my master perched thereon, seen by the Maenads better far than he saw them; for scarce was he beheld upon his lofty throne, when the stranger disappeared, while from the sky there came a voice, 'twould seem, by Dionysus uttered- "Maidens, I bring the man who tried to mock you and me and my mystic rites; take vengeance on him." And as he spake he raised 'twixt heaven and earth a dazzling column of awful flame. Hushed grew the sky, and still hung each leaf throughout the grassy glen, nor couldst thou have heard one creature cry. But they, not sure of the voice they heard, sprang up and peered all round; then once again his bidding came; and when the daughters of Cadmus knew it was the Bacchic god in very truth that called, swift as doves they dirted off in cager haste, his mother Agave and her sisters dear and all the Bacchanals; through torrent glen, o'er boulders huge they bounded on, inspired with madness by the god. Soon as they saw my master perched upon the fir, they set to hurling stones at him with all their might, mounting a commanding eminence, and with pine-branches he was pelted as with darts; and others shot their wands through the air at Pentheus, their hapless target, but all to no purpose. For there he sat beyond the reach of their hot endeavours, a helpless, hopeless victim. At last they rent off limbs from oaks and were for prising up the roots with levers not of iron. But when they still could make no end to all their toil


Πενθέα δʼ ἱδρύσας ἐλατίνων ὄζων ἔπιHe sat Pentheus down on the pine branch, and let it go upright through his hands steadily, taking care not to shake him off. The pine stood firmly upright into the sky, with my master seated on its back.


ὀρθὸν μεθίει διὰ χερῶν βλάστημʼ ἄνωHe sat Pentheus down on the pine branch, and let it go upright through his hands steadily, taking care not to shake him off. The pine stood firmly upright into the sky, with my master seated on its back.


ἀτρέμα, φυλάσσων μὴ ἀναχαιτίσειέ νινHe sat Pentheus down on the pine branch, and let it go upright through his hands steadily, taking care not to shake him off. The pine stood firmly upright into the sky, with my master seated on its back.


ὀρθὴ δʼ ἐς ὀρθὸν αἰθέρʼ ἐστηρίζετοHe sat Pentheus down on the pine branch, and let it go upright through his hands steadily, taking care not to shake him off. The pine stood firmly upright into the sky, with my master seated on its back.


ἔχουσα νώτοις δεσπότην ἐφήμενον·He sat Pentheus down on the pine branch, and let it go upright through his hands steadily, taking care not to shake him off. The pine stood firmly upright into the sky, with my master seated on its back.


ὤφθη δὲ μᾶλλον ἢ κατεῖδε μαινάδας.He was seen by the Maenads more than he saw them, for sitting on high he was all but apparent, and the stranger was no longer anywhere to be seen, when a voice, Dionysus as I guess, cried out from the air: Young women


ὅσον γὰρ οὔπω δῆλος ἦν θάσσων ἄνωHe was seen by the Maenads more than he saw them, for sitting on high he was all but apparent, and the stranger was no longer anywhere to be seen, when a voice, Dionysus as I guess, cried out from the air: Young women


καὶ τὸν ξένον μὲν οὐκέτʼ εἰσορᾶν παρῆνHe was seen by the Maenads more than he saw them, for sitting on high he was all but apparent, and the stranger was no longer anywhere to be seen, when a voice, Dionysus as I guess, cried out from the air: Young women


ἐκ δʼ αἰθέρος φωνή τις, ὡς μὲν εἰκάσαιHe was seen by the Maenads more than he saw them, for sitting on high he was all but apparent, and the stranger was no longer anywhere to be seen, when a voice, Dionysus as I guess, cried out from the air: Young women


Διόνυσος, ἀνεβόησεν· Ὦ νεάνιδεςHe was seen by the Maenads more than he saw them, for sitting on high he was all but apparent, and the stranger was no longer anywhere to be seen, when a voice, Dionysus as I guess, cried out from the air: Young women


ἄγω τὸν ὑμᾶς κἀμὲ τἀμά τʼ ὄργιαI bring the one who has made you and me and my rites a laughing-stock. Now punish him! And as he said this a light of holy fire was placed between heaven and earth. The air became quiet and the woody glen


γέλων τιθέμενον· ἀλλὰ τιμωρεῖσθέ νιν.I bring the one who has made you and me and my rites a laughing-stock. Now punish him! And as he said this a light of holy fire was placed between heaven and earth. The air became quiet and the woody glen


καὶ ταῦθʼ ἅμʼ ἠγόρευε καὶ πρὸς οὐρανὸνI bring the one who has made you and me and my rites a laughing-stock. Now punish him! And as he said this a light of holy fire was placed between heaven and earth. The air became quiet and the woody glen


καὶ γαῖαν ἐστήριξε φῶς σεμνοῦ πυρός.I bring the one who has made you and me and my rites a laughing-stock. Now punish him! And as he said this a light of holy fire was placed between heaven and earth. The air became quiet and the woody glen


nanI bring the one who has made you and me and my rites a laughing-stock. Now punish him! And as he said this a light of holy fire was placed between heaven and earth. The air became quiet and the woody glen


φύλλʼ εἶχε, θηρῶν δʼ οὐκ ἂν ἤκουσας βοήν.kept its leaves silent, nor would you have heard the sounds of animals. But they, not having heard the sound clearly, stood upright and looked all around. He repeated his order, and when the daughters of Kadmos recognized the clear command of Bacchus


αἳ δʼ ὠσὶν ἠχὴν οὐ σαφῶς δεδεγμέναιkept its leaves silent, nor would you have heard the sounds of animals. But they, not having heard the sound clearly, stood upright and looked all around. He repeated his order, and when the daughters of Kadmos recognized the clear command of Bacchus


ἔστησαν ὀρθαὶ καὶ διήνεγκαν κόρας.kept its leaves silent, nor would you have heard the sounds of animals. But they, not having heard the sound clearly, stood upright and looked all around. He repeated his order, and when the daughters of Kadmos recognized the clear command of Bacchus


ὃ δʼ αὖθις ἐπεκέλευσεν· ὡς δʼ ἐγνώρισανkept its leaves silent, nor would you have heard the sounds of animals. But they, not having heard the sound clearly, stood upright and looked all around. He repeated his order, and when the daughters of Kadmos recognized the clear command of Bacchus


σαφῆ κελευσμὸν Βακχίου Κάδμου κόραιkept its leaves silent, nor would you have heard the sounds of animals. But they, not having heard the sound clearly, stood upright and looked all around. He repeated his order, and when the daughters of Kadmos recognized the clear command of Bacchus


ᾖξαν πελείας ὠκύτητʼ οὐχ ἥσσονεςthey rushed forth, swift as a dove, running with eager speed of feet, his mother Agave, and her sisters, and all the Bacchae. They leapt through the torrent-streaming valley and mountain cliffs, frantic with the inspiration of the god.


ποδῶν τρέχουσαι συντόνοις δραμήμασιthey rushed forth, swift as a dove, running with eager speed of feet, his mother Agave, and her sisters, and all the Bacchae. They leapt through the torrent-streaming valley and mountain cliffs, frantic with the inspiration of the god.


μήτηρ Ἀγαύη σύγγονοί θʼ ὁμόσποροιthey rushed forth, swift as a dove, running with eager speed of feet, his mother Agave, and her sisters, and all the Bacchae. They leapt through the torrent-streaming valley and mountain cliffs, frantic with the inspiration of the god.


πᾶσαί τε βάκχαι· διὰ δὲ χειμάρρου νάπηςthey rushed forth, swift as a dove, running with eager speed of feet, his mother Agave, and her sisters, and all the Bacchae. They leapt through the torrent-streaming valley and mountain cliffs, frantic with the inspiration of the god.


ἀγμῶν τʼ ἐπήδων θεοῦ πνοαῖσιν ἐμμανεῖς.they rushed forth, swift as a dove, running with eager speed of feet, his mother Agave, and her sisters, and all the Bacchae. They leapt through the torrent-streaming valley and mountain cliffs, frantic with the inspiration of the god.


ὡς δʼ εἶδον ἐλάτῃ δεσπότην ἐφήμενονWhen they saw my master sitting in the pine, first they climbed a rock towering opposite the tree and began to hurl at him boulders violently thrown. Some aimed with pine branches and other women hurled their thyrsoi through the air


πρῶτον μὲν αὐτοῦ χερμάδας κραταιβόλουςWhen they saw my master sitting in the pine, first they climbed a rock towering opposite the tree and began to hurl at him boulders violently thrown. Some aimed with pine branches and other women hurled their thyrsoi through the air


ἔρριπτον, ἀντίπυργον ἐπιβᾶσαι πέτρανWhen they saw my master sitting in the pine, first they climbed a rock towering opposite the tree and began to hurl at him boulders violently thrown. Some aimed with pine branches and other women hurled their thyrsoi through the air


ὄζοισί τʼ ἐλατίνοισιν ἠκοντίζετο.When they saw my master sitting in the pine, first they climbed a rock towering opposite the tree and began to hurl at him boulders violently thrown. Some aimed with pine branches and other women hurled their thyrsoi through the air


ἄλλαι δὲ θύρσους ἵεσαν διʼ αἰθέροςWhen they saw my master sitting in the pine, first they climbed a rock towering opposite the tree and began to hurl at him boulders violently thrown. Some aimed with pine branches and other women hurled their thyrsoi through the air


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.130-6.140 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.130. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.131. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.132. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.133. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.134. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.135. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.136. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.137. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.138. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.139. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.140. /and he lived not for long, seeing that he was hated of all the immortal gods. So would not I be minded to fight against the blessed gods. But if thou art of men, who eat the fruit of the field, draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. Then spake to him the glorious son of Hippolochus:
2. Aeschylus, Persians, 354 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

354. φανεὶς ἀλάστωρ ἢ κακὸς δαίμων ποθέν.
3. Anacreon, Fragments, 357 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Anacreon, Fragments, 357 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 985-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. εὐπέταλος ἕλικι θάλλει.
6. Euripides, Bacchae, 1000-1009, 101, 1010-1019, 102, 1020-1029, 103, 1030-1039, 104, 1040-1042, 1044-1049, 105, 1050-1059, 106, 1060-1069, 107, 1070-1079, 108, 1080-1089, 109, 1090-1099, 110, 1100-1109, 111, 1110-1119, 112, 1120-1129, 113, 1130-1139, 114, 1140-1149, 115, 1150-1152, 116-123, 1239, 124, 1240, 125-166, 31-40, 443-450, 507, 576-639, 64, 640-649, 65, 650-656, 66, 667, 67, 677-679, 68, 680-689, 69, 690-699, 70, 700-709, 71, 710-719, 72, 720-729, 73, 730-739, 74, 740-749, 75, 750-759, 76, 760-769, 77, 770-774, 78-91, 918-919, 92, 920-929, 93, 930-939, 94, 940-949, 95, 950-959, 96, 960-969, 97, 970-979, 98, 980-989, 99, 990-999, 100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. τέλεσαν, ταυρόκερων θεὸν 100. had perfected him, the bull-horned god, and he crowned him with crowns of snakes, for which reason Maenads cloak their wild prey over their locks. Choru
7. Sophocles, Ajax, 464 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Sophocles, Antigone, 1116-1152, 1115 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. New Testament, Acts, 1.18 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.18. Now this man obtained a field with the reward for his wickedness, and falling headlong, his body burst open, and all his intestines gushed out.
10. Plutarch, Camillus, 5.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.2. From the sacred rites used in the worship of this goddess, she might be held to be almost identical with Leucothea. The women bring a serving-maid into the sanctuary and beat her with rods, then drive her forth again; they embrace their nephews and nieces in preference to their own children; and their conduct at the sacrifice resembles that of the nurses of Dionysus, or that of Ino under the afflictions put upon her by her husband’s concubine. After his vows, Camillus invaded the country of the Faliscans and conquered them in a great battle, together with the Capenates who came up to their aid.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adaptation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 141
agave Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127, 133, 148
anti-hero, dionysus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
athens, athenians Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49
bacchants, bacchae, bacchai Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
black sea, landscape Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49
bull Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
calvary Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 133
chorus, in drama Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
cithaeron Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127, 133, 136
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysia, great and rural (festivals) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
dionysos, arrival Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysos, awakening Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysos, dionysos bromios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysos, nurse of Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysos, punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysus Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49
dismemberment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
euripides, bacchae Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 136, 148
euripides, exodos (missing part/lacuna) of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 136, 148
euripides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 148
geographical writing Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49
gospels Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 133
greece Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49
hamartia Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127
hellenistic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
heracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
hero Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
ino Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
ivy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
jesus christ, and dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 136
jesus christ Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 133, 136, 141
joseph of arimathea Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 148
judas, and pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 141
madness (mania)/frenzy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127, 148
maenad-nymphs Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
maenads, maenadic, maenadism, rites/cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
maenads/maenadism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127, 136, 148
maenads Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
melitaia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
messenger Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
messengers/messenger-speech Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127, 133, 136
miracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
mount kithairon (cithaeron) Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49
mountains, and the divine Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
myth Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49
nymph Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
nysa, nyseion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
pausanias Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49
pentheus Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127, 133, 136, 141, 148
pity (ἔλεος) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127, 148
pottery Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
pseudo-apollodorus, library Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49
pseudo-plutarch, on rivers and mountains, and things found in them Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49
punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
punning derivation (of names) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 141
pythian festival Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49
rationalising approaches to myth Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49
reception, of dramatic conventions Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127
reception, of dramatic situations and themes Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 133, 136, 141, 148
reconfiguration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 136
redemption Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 136
resemblances, reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127, 133, 136, 141, 148
resemblances Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 133, 148
rite, ritual, maenadic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
rocks/stones Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49
rome, roman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
sacrifice Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49
semele Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
sparagmos/dismemberment Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127, 133, 136, 141, 148
sparagmos Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
thebes (boeotia) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
thebes (boiotia) Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49
theotokos (mother of god) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 133, 136, 148
thyrsos (–oi) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 127
tragedy Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49
walpole, horace Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49
wilderness Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 49
woman' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
women Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112