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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5614
Euripides, Bacchae, 104


πλοκάμοις. Χορόςhad perfected him, the bull-horned god, and he crowned him with crowns of snakes, for which reason Maenads cloak their wild prey over their locks. Choru


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

33 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 563 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

563. And slumber in a bedroom far within
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 117 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

117. of the immortal gods, and those created
3. Homeric Hymns, To Demeter, 47, 211 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

211. Around her slender feet her dark-blue dre
4. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 179 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

179. φιλοθύτων δέ τοι πόλεος ὀργίων
5. Pindar, Paeanes, 3.8-3.58 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Aristophanes, Frogs, 341-352, 356, 340 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

340. †ἔγειρε φλογέας λαμπάδας ἐν χερσὶ γὰρ ἥκει τινάσσων†
7. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 985-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. εὐπέταλος ἕλικι θάλλει.
8. Euripides, Bacchae, 1000-1009, 101, 1010-1019, 102, 1020-1029, 103, 1030-1049, 105, 1050-1059, 106, 1060-1069, 107, 1070-1079, 108, 1080-1089, 109, 1090-1099, 110, 1100-1109, 111, 1110-1119, 112, 1120-1129, 113, 1130-1139, 114, 1140-1149, 115, 1150-1152, 116-119, 1194-1196, 120-133, 1330-1331, 134-135, 1358, 136-169, 2, 201, 215-225, 228, 234, 241-246, 286-293, 3, 314-318, 4, 443-450, 47, 486-487, 5, 50, 519-529, 55-57, 576-579, 58, 580-589, 59, 590-599, 6, 60, 600-609, 61, 610-619, 62, 620-629, 63, 630-639, 64, 640-649, 65, 650-656, 66, 665, 667, 67, 677-679, 68, 680-689, 69, 690-699, 7, 70, 700-709, 71, 710-719, 72, 720-729, 73, 730-739, 74, 740-749, 75, 750-759, 76, 760-769, 77, 770-774, 78-79, 8, 80-89, 9, 90-91, 918-919, 92, 920-929, 93, 930-939, 94, 940-949, 95, 950-959, 96, 960-969, 97, 970-979, 98, 980-989, 99, 990-999, 100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. τέλεσαν, ταυρόκερων θεὸν 100. had perfected him, the bull-horned god, and he crowned him with crowns of snakes, for which reason Maenads cloak their wild prey over their locks. Choru
9. Euripides, Helen, 1302-1368, 1301 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1301. ̓Ορεία ποτὲ δρομάδι κώ- 1301. Once with swift foot the mountain mother of the gods rushed through the wooded glen, and the river’s stream
10. Euripides, Hippolytus, 142-144, 25, 141 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

141. Maiden, thou must be possessed, by Pan made frantic or by Hecate, or by the Corybantes dread, and Cybele the mountain mother.
11. Euripides, Ion, 717, 716 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 684-687, 683 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Euripides, Rhesus, 973, 972 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

972. As under far Pangaion Orpheus lies
14. Herodotus, Histories, 2.146 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.146. With regard to these two, Pan and Dionysus, one may follow whatever story one thinks most credible; but I give my own opinion concerning them here. Had Dionysus son of Semele and Pan son of Penelope appeared in Hellas and lived there to old age, like Heracles the son of Amphitryon, it might have been said that they too (like Heracles) were but men, named after the older Pan and Dionysus, the gods of antiquity; ,but as it is, the Greek story has it that no sooner was Dionysus born than Zeus sewed him up in his thigh and carried him away to Nysa in Ethiopia beyond Egypt ; and as for Pan, the Greeks do not know what became of him after his birth. It is therefore plain to me that the Greeks learned the names of these two gods later than the names of all the others, and trace the birth of both to the time when they gained the knowledge.
15. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

700b. one class of song was that of prayers to the gods, which bore the name of hymns ; contrasted with this was another class, best called dirges ; paeans formed another; and yet another was the dithyramb, named, I fancy, after Dionysus. Nomes also were so called as being a distinct class of song; and these were further described as citharoedic nomes. So these and other kinds being classified and fixed, it was forbidden to set one kind of words to a different class of tune.
16. Sophocles, Antigone, 1116-1152, 1115 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17. Aristotle, Poetics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

18. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.1125-1.1151 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.1125. μητέρα Δινδυμίην πολυπότνιαν ἀγκαλέοντες 1.1126. ἐνναέτιν Φρυγίης, Τιτίην θʼ ἅμα Κύλληνόν τε 1.1127. οἳ μοῦνοι πολέων μοιρηγέται ἠδὲ πάρεδροι 1.1128. μητέρος Ἰδαίης κεκλήαται, ὅσσοι ἔασιν 1.1129. δάκτυλοι Ἰδαῖοι Κρηταιέες, οὕς ποτε νύμφη 1.1130. Ἀγχιάλη Δικταῖον ἀνὰ σπέος ἀμφοτέρῃσιν 1.1131. δραξαμένη γαίης Οἰαξίδος ἐβλάστησεν. 1.1132. πολλὰ δὲ τήνγε λιτῇσιν ἀποστρέψαι ἐριώλας 1.1133. Λἰσονίδης γουνάζετʼ ἐπιλλείβων ἱεροῖσιν 1.1134. αἰθομένοις· ἄμυδις δὲ νέοι Ὀρφῆος ἀνωγῇ 1.1135. σκαίροντες βηταρμὸν ἐνόπλιον ὠρχήσαντο 1.1136. καὶ σάκεα ξιφέεσσιν ἐπέκτυπον, ὥς κεν ἰωὴ 1.1137. δύσφημος πλάζοιτο διʼ ἠέρος, ἣν ἔτι λαοὶ 1.1138. κηδείῃ βασιλῆος ἀνέστενον. ἔνθεν ἐσαιεὶ 1.1139. ῥόμβῳ καὶ τυπάνῳ Ῥείην Φρύγες ἱλάσκονται. 1.1140. ἡ δέ που εὐαγέεσσιν ἐπὶ φρένα θῆκε θυηλαῖς 1.1141. ἀνταίη δαίμων· τὰ δʼ ἐοικότα σήματʼ ἔγεντο. 1.1142. δένδρεα μὲν καρπὸν χέον ἄσπετον, ἀμφὶ δὲ ποσσὶν 1.1143. αὐτομάτη φύε γαῖα τερείνης ἄνθεα ποίης. 1.1144. θῆρες δʼ εἰλυούς τε κατὰ ξυλόχους τε λιπόντες 1.1145. οὐρῇσιν σαίνοντες ἐπήλυθον. ἡ δὲ καὶ ἄλλο 1.1146. θῆκε τέρας· ἐπεὶ οὔτι παροίτερον ὕδατι νᾶεν 1.1147. Δίνδυμον· ἀλλά σφιν τότʼ ἀνέβραχε διψάδος αὔτως 1.1148. ἐκ κορυφῆς ἄλληκτον· Ἰησονίην δʼ ἐνέπουσιν 1.1149. κεῖνο ποτὸν κρήνην περιναιέται ἄνδρες ὀπίσσω. 1.1150. καὶ τότε μὲν δαῖτʼ ἀμφὶ θεᾶς θέσαν οὔρεσιν Ἄρκτων 1.1151. μέλποντες Ῥείην πολυπότνιαν· αὐτὰρ ἐς ἠὼ
19. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 3.62.6, 4.3.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.62.6.  And though the writers of myths have handed down the account of a third birth as well, at which, as they say, the Sons of Gaia tore to pieces the god, who was a son of Zeus and Demeter, and boiled him, but his members were brought together again by Demeter and he experienced a new birth as if for the first time, such accounts as this they trace back to certain causes found in nature. 4.3.3.  Consequently in many Greek cities every other year Bacchic bands of women gather, and it is lawful for the maidens to carry the thyrsus and to join in the frenzied revelry, crying out "Euai!" and honouring the god; while the matrons, forming in groups, offer sacrifices to the god and celebrate his mysteries and, in general, extol with hymns the presence of Dionysus, in this manner acting the part of the Maenads who, as history records, were of old the companions of the god.
20. Hyginus, Fabulae (Genealogiae), 167 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

21. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 3.256-3.315 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

22. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 3.4.2-3.4.3, 3.10.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.4.2. Κάδμος δὲ ἀνθʼ ὧν ἔκτεινεν ἀίδιον 3 -- ἐνιαυτὸν ἐθήτευσεν Ἄρει· ἦν δὲ ὁ ἐνιαυτὸς τότε ὀκτὼ ἔτη. μετὰ δὲ τὴν θητείαν Ἀθηνᾶ αὐτῷ τὴν βασιλείαν 4 -- κατεσκεύασε, Ζεὺς δὲ ἔδωκεν αὐτῷ γυναῖκα Ἁρμονίαν, Ἀφροδίτης καὶ Ἄρεος θυγατέρα. καὶ πάντες θεοὶ καταλιπόντες τὸν οὐρανόν, ἐν τῇ Καδμείᾳ τὸν γάμον εὐωχούμενοι καθύμνησαν. ἔδωκε δὲ αὐτῇ Κάδμος πέπλον καὶ τὸν ἡφαιστότευκτον ὅρμον, ὃν ὑπὸ Ἡφαίστου λέγουσί τινες δοθῆναι Κάδμῳ, Φερεκύδης δὲ ὑπὸ Εὐρώπης· ὃν παρὰ Διὸς αὐτὴν λαβεῖν. γίνονται δὲ Κάδμῳ θυγατέρες μὲν Αὐτονόη Ἰνὼ Σεμέλη Ἀγαυή, παῖς δὲ Πολύδωρος. Ἰνὼ μὲν οὖν Ἀθάμας ἔγημεν, Αὐτονόην δὲ Ἀρισταῖος, Ἀγαυὴν δὲ Ἐχίων. 3.4.3. Σεμέλης δὲ Ζεὺς ἐρασθεὶς Ἥρας κρύφα συνευνάζεται. ἡ δὲ ἐξαπατηθεῖσα ὑπὸ Ἥρας, κατανεύσαντος αὐτῇ Διὸς πᾶν τὸ αἰτηθὲν ποιήσειν, αἰτεῖται τοιοῦτον αὐτὸν ἐλθεῖν οἷος ἦλθε μνηστευόμενος Ἥραν. Ζεὺς δὲ μὴ δυνάμενος ἀνανεῦσαι παραγίνεται εἰς τὸν θάλαμον αὐτῆς ἐφʼ ἅρματος ἀστραπαῖς ὁμοῦ καὶ βρονταῖς, καὶ κεραυνὸν ἵησιν. Σεμέλης δὲ διὰ τὸν φόβον ἐκλιπούσης, ἑξαμηνιαῖον τὸ βρέφος ἐξαμβλωθὲν ἐκ τοῦ πυρὸς ἁρπάσας ἐνέρραψε τῷ μηρῷ. ἀποθανούσης δὲ Σεμέλης, αἱ λοιπαὶ Κάδμου θυγατέρες διήνεγκαν λόγον, συνηυνῆσθαι θνητῷ τινι Σεμέλην καὶ καταψεύσασθαι Διός, καὶ ὅτι 1 -- διὰ τοῦτο ἐκεραυνώθη. κατὰ δὲ τὸν χρόνον τὸν καθήκοντα Διόνυσον γεννᾷ Ζεὺς λύσας τὰ ῥάμματα, καὶ δίδωσιν Ἑρμῇ. ὁ δὲ κομίζει πρὸς Ἰνὼ καὶ Ἀθάμαντα καὶ πείθει τρέφειν ὡς κόρην. ἀγανακτήσασα δὲ Ἥρα μανίαν αὐτοῖς ἐνέβαλε, καὶ Ἀθάμας μὲν τὸν πρεσβύτερον παῖδα Λέαρχον ὡς ἔλαφον θηρεύσας ἀπέκτεινεν, Ἰνὼ δὲ τὸν Μελικέρτην εἰς πεπυρωμένον λέβητα ῥίψασα, εἶτα βαστάσασα μετὰ νεκροῦ τοῦ παιδὸς ἥλατο κατὰ βυθοῦ. 1 -- καὶ Λευκοθέα μὲν αὐτὴν καλεῖται, Παλαίμων δὲ ὁ παῖς, οὕτως ὀνομασθέντες ὑπὸ τῶν πλεόντων· τοῖς χειμαζομένοις γὰρ βοηθοῦσιν. ἐτέθη δὲ ἐπὶ Μελικέρτῃ ὁ 2 -- ἀγὼν τῶν Ἰσθμίων, Σισύφου θέντος. Διόνυσον δὲ Ζεὺς εἰς ἔριφον ἀλλάξας τὸν Ἥρας θυμὸν ἔκλεψε, καὶ λαβὼν αὐτὸν Ἑρμῆς πρὸς νύμφας ἐκόμισεν ἐν Νύσῃ κατοικούσας τῆς Ἀσίας, ἃς ὕστερον Ζεὺς καταστερίσας ὠνόμασεν Ὑάδας. 3.10.3. Ταϋγέτη δὲ ἐκ Διὸς ἐγέννησε 1 -- Λακεδαίμονα, ἀφʼ οὗ καὶ Λακεδαίμων ἡ χώρα καλεῖται. Λακεδαίμονος δὲ καὶ Σπάρτης τῆς Εὐρώτα, ὃς ἦν ἀπὸ Λέλεγος αὐτόχθονος καὶ νύμφης νηίδος Κλεοχαρείας, Ἀμύκλας καὶ Εὐρυδίκη, ἣν ἔγημεν Ἀκρίσιος. Ἀμύκλα δὲ καὶ Διομήδης τῆς Λαπίθου Κυνόρτης καὶ Ὑάκινθος. τοῦτον εἶναι τοῦ Ἀπόλλωνος ἐρώμενον λέγουσιν, ὃν δίσκῳ βαλὼν ἄκων ἀπέκτεινε. Κυνόρτου δὲ Περιήρης, ὃς γαμεῖ Γοργοφόνην τὴν Περσέως, καθάπερ Στησίχορός φησι, καὶ τίκτει Τυνδάρεων Ἰκάριον Ἀφαρέα Λεύκιππον. Ἀφαρέως μὲν οὖν καὶ Ἀρήνης τῆς Οἰβάλου 1 -- Λυγκεύς τε καὶ Ἴδας καὶ Πεῖσος· κατὰ πολλοὺς δὲ Ἴδας ἐκ Ποσειδῶνος λέγεται. Λυγκεὺς δὲ ὀξυδερκίᾳ διήνεγκεν, ὡς καὶ τὰ ὑπὸ γῆν θεωρεῖν. Λευκίππου δὲ θυγατέρες ἐγένοντο Ἱλάειρα καὶ Φοίβη· ταύτας ἁρπάσαντες ἔγημαν Διόσκουροι. πρὸς δὲ ταύταις Ἀρσινόην ἐγέννησε. ταύτῃ μίγνυται Ἀπόλλων, ἡ δὲ Ἀσκληπιὸν γεννᾷ. τινὲς δὲ Ἀσκληπιὸν οὐκ ἐξ Ἀρσινόης τῆς Λευκίππου λέγουσιν, ἀλλʼ ἐκ Κορωνίδος τῆς Φλεγύου ἐν Θεσσαλίᾳ. καί φασιν ἐρασθῆναι ταύτης Ἀπόλλωνα καὶ εὐθέως συνελθεῖν· τὴν δὲ 1 -- παρὰ τὴν τοῦ πατρὸς γνώμην ἑλομένην 2 -- Ἴσχυϊ τῷ Καινέως ἀδελφῷ συνοικεῖν. Ἀπόλλων δὲ τὸν μὲν ἀπαγγείλαντα κόρακα καταρᾶται, ὃν 3 -- τέως λευκὸν ὄντα ἐποίησε μέλανα, αὐτὴν δὲ ἀπέκτεινε. καιομένης δὲ αὐτῆς 4 -- ἁρπάσας τὸ βρέφος ἐκ τῆς πυρᾶς πρὸς Χείρωνα τὸν Κένταυρον ἤνεγκε, παρʼ ᾧ 1 -- καὶ τὴν ἰατρικὴν καὶ τὴν κυνηγετικὴν τρεφόμενος ἐδιδάχθη. καὶ γενόμενος χειρουργικὸς καὶ τὴν τέχνην ἀσκήσας ἐπὶ πολὺ οὐ μόνον ἐκώλυέ τινας ἀποθνήσκειν, ἀλλʼ ἀνήγειρε καὶ τοὺς ἀποθανόντας· παρὰ γὰρ Ἀθηνᾶς λαβὼν τὸ ἐκ τῶν φλεβῶν τῆς Γοργόνος ῥυὲν αἷμα, τῷ μὲν ἐκ τῶν ἀριστερῶν ῥυέντι πρὸς φθορὰν ἀνθρώπων ἐχρῆτο, τῷ δὲ ἐκ τῶν δεξιῶν πρὸς σωτηρίαν, καὶ διὰ τούτου 2 -- τοὺς τεθνηκότας ἀνήγειρεν. εὗρον 3 -- δέ τινας λεγομένους ἀναστῆναι ὑπʼ αὐτοῦ, Καπανέα καὶ Λυκοῦργον, ὡς Στησίχορός φησιν ἐν Ἐριφύλῃ, Ἱππόλυτον, ὡς ὁ τὰ Ναυπακτικὰ συγγράψας λέγει, Τυνδάρεων, ὥς φησι Πανύασις, 1 -- Ὑμέναιον, ὡς οἱ Ὀρφικοὶ λέγουσι, Γλαῦκον τὸν Μίνωος, ὡς Μελησαγόρας λέγε ι.
23. Cornutus, De Natura Deorum, 30 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

24. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 41.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

25. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 2.16.1, 2.22.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

26. Lucian, The Dance, 79, 15 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

27. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.26.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.26.7. The third account is, in my opinion, the farthest from the truth; it makes Asclepius to be the son of Arsinoe, the daughter of Leucippus. For when Apollophanes the Arcadian, came to Delphi and asked the god if Asclepius was the son of Arsinoe and therefore a Messenian, the Pythian priestess gave this response:— 0 Asclepius, born to bestow great joy upon mortals, Pledge of the mutual love I enjoyed with Phlegyas' daughter, Lovely Coronis, who bare thee in rugged land Epidaurus . Unknown . This oracle makes it quite certain that Asclepius was not a son of Arsinoe, and that the story was a fiction invented by Hesiod, or by one of Hesiod's interpolators, just to please the Messenians.
28. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 4.21 (2nd cent. CE

4.21. And he is said to have rebuked the Athenians for their conduct of the festival of Dionysus, which they hold at the season of the month Anthesterion. For when he saw them flocking to the theater he imagined that the were going to listen to solos and compositions in the way of processional and rhythmic hymns, such as are sung in comedies and tragedies; but when he heard them dancing lascivious jigs to the rondos of a pipe, and in the midst of the sacred epic of Orpheus striking attitudes as the Hours, or as nymphs, or as bacchants, he set himself to rebuke their proceedings and said: Stop dancing away the reputations of the victors of Salamis as well as of many other good men deported this life. For if indeed this were a Lacedaemonian form of dance, I would say, “Bravo, soldiers; for you are training yourselves for war, and I will join in your dance'; but as it is a soft dance and one of effeminate tendency, what am I to say of your national trophies? Not as monuments of shame to the Medians or Persians, but to your own shame they will have been raised, should you degenerate so much from those who set them up. And what do you mean by your saffron robes and your purple and scarlet raiment? For surely the Acharnians never dressed themselves up in this way, nor ever the knights of Colonus rode in such garb. A woman commanded a ship from Caria and sailed against you with Xerxes, and about her there was nothing womanly, but she wore the garb and armor of a man; but you are softer than the women of Xerxes' day, and you are dressing yourselves up to your own despite, old and young and striplings alike, all those who of old flocked to the shrine of Agraulus in order to swear to die in battle on behalf of the fatherland. And now it seems that the same people are ready to swear to become bacchants and don the thyrsus in behalf of their country; and no one bears a helmet, but disguised as female harlequins, to use the phrase of Euripides, they shine in shame alone. Nay more, I hear that you turn yourselves into winds, and wave your skirts, and pretend that you are ships bellying their sails aloft. But surely you might at least have some respect for the winds that were your allies and once blew mightily to protect you, instead of turning Boreas who was your patron, and who of all the winds is the most masculine, into a woman; for Boreas would never have become the lover of Oreithya, if he had seen her executing, like you, a skirt dance.
29. Arnobius, Against The Gentiles, 2.73 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

30. Firmicus Maternus Julius., De Errore Profanarum Religionum, 6.5 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

31. Origen, Against Celsus, 1.25 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.25. And perhaps there is a danger as great as that which degrades the name of God, or of the Good, to improper objects, in changing the name of God according to a secret system, and applying those which belong to inferior beings to greater, and vice versa. And I do not dwell on this, that when the name of Zeus is uttered, there is heard at the same time that of the son of Kronos and Rhea, and the husband of Hera, and brother of Poseidon, and father of Athene, and Artemis, who was guilty of incest with his own daughter Persephone; or that Apollo immediately suggests the son of Leto and Zeus, and the brother of Artemis, and half-brother of Hermes; and so with all the other names invented by these wise men of Celsus, who are the parents of these opinions, and the ancient theologians of the Greeks. For what are the grounds for deciding that he should on the one hand be properly called Zeus, and yet on the other should not have Kronos for his father and Rhea for his mother? And the same argument applies to all the others that are called gods. But this charge does not at all apply to those who, for some mysterious reason, refer the word Sabaoth, or Adonai, or any of the other names to the (true) God. And when one is able to philosophize about the mystery of names, he will find much to say respecting the titles of the angels of God, of whom one is called Michael, and another Gabriel, and another Raphael, appropriately to the duties which they discharge in the world, according to the will of the God of all things. And a similar philosophy of names applies also to our Jesus, whose name has already been seen, in an unmistakeable manner, to have expelled myriads of evil spirits from the souls and bodies (of men), so great was the power which it exerted upon those from whom the spirits were driven out. And while still upon the subject of names, we have to mention that those who are skilled in the use of incantations, relate that the utterance of the same incantation in its proper language can accomplish what the spell professes to do; but when translated into any other tongue, it is observed to become inefficacious and feeble. And thus it is not the things signified, but the qualities and peculiarities of words, which possess a certain power for this or that purpose. And so on such grounds as these we defend the conduct of the Christians, when they struggle even to death to avoid calling God by the name of Zeus, or to give Him a name from any other language. For they either use the common name - God - indefinitely, or with some such addition as that of the Maker of all things, the Creator of heaven and earth - He who sent down to the human race those good men, to whose names that of God being added, certain mighty works are wrought among men. And much more besides might be said on the subject of names, against those who think that we ought to be indifferent as to our use of them. And if the remark of Plato in the Philebus should surprise us, when he says, My fear, O Protagoras, about the names of the gods is no small one, seeing Philebus in his discussion with Socrates had called pleasure a god, how shall we not rather approve the piety of the Christians, who apply none of the names used in the mythologies to the Creator of the world? And now enough on this subject for the present.
32. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 16.401 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

33. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 327, 59, 325



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agave Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
alexander the great Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175
anti-hero, dionysus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
antigone Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 111, 112
apollo Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 111
archaic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172
argeifontes ἀργειφόντης Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172
asclepius de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
asia, asian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
bacchae Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 381
bacchants, bacchae, bacchai Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 172, 175, 335
bassaras, bassarides, bassarae Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172
bellona Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175
billings, j. xviii Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 381
bona dea Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175
bull Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 336; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
cattle Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
chiron de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
chora Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 109, 110, 111, 112
choregos Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 110
choreia Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 109, 111
choros Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 111
chorus, in drama Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
chorus (male, female), of a. edonoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
chorus leader Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 110
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 175, 335
chronotope Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 109, 112
chthonic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
cithaeron Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 109; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
cotys Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
countryside Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 110
crown, crowned Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172, 335, 336
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 175, 335, 336
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
cybele Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
dance, dancing, ecstatic, frenzied, maenadic, orgiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 175
dea syria Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175
death Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 111, 112
death associated with dionysos and dionysian cult or myth Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175, 335
delphi, delphian, delphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175
delphi Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 110
demeter, and kore (persephone) Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
demeter Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
dindymene Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
dionysia, great and rural (festivals) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
dionyso(u)s Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 381
dionysos, awakening Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335, 336
dionysos, dionysos bassareus/bassaros Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
dionysos, epiphany Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172, 335, 336
dionysos, miracles Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175
dionysos, prodigies Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 336
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 172, 175, 335, 336
dionysus, birth de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 63, 128
dionysus, heart de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
dionysus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 109, 110, 111, 112
dismemberment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 172, 175
dithyramb, language of Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 157
dragon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 336
earth de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
earth (gaea), as demeter Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
earth (gaea) Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 172, 175
eleusis Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 111
epiphany Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 110
euripides, bacchae Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 157
euripides, on the mother of the gods Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
fates Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 336
fawn Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
female, rites Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175
feminine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175
fertility Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175
festival, festivity, festive Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172
fire Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
goat Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
hades Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 112
harmonia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 336
hellenistic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
hera de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
heracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
hero Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
hesiod Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
homer Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
homeric, post-homeric Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172
homeric hymn, to earth Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
hysteria Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175
iacchus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 111
ida, idaean mother Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
ida Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
initiands/initiates/initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
initiate Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
initiates de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
inspiration Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
ivy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172
kadmos, kadmeian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 335, 336
kithairon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
kybele Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175
leopard Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172
life de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 63, 128
light Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 111
lightning de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
lion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172, 335
lydia and lydians, and phrygian symbols Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
lydia and lydians, rites of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
madness (mania)/frenzy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
maenads, maenadic, maenadism, rites/cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 172, 175
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 172, 175, 335, 336
maenads Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
male Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335, 336
messenger Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
milk Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172
miracles Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
mise en abyme Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 109, 111
mother of the gods, and animals Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
mother of the gods, as demeter Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
mother of the gods, as earth (gaea) Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
mother of the gods, as mountain mother Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
mother of the gods, as rhea Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
mother of the gods, associated with mountains Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
mother of the gods, daughter of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
mother of the gods, great Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
mother of the gods, in attic drama Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
mother of the gods, multiple identities of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
mountains Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172
musaeus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
music, musical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175
mystery Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
mystic Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 111
mystic initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 175, 335, 336
myth de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
narthex νάρθηξ Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172
nature Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172
nebris νεβρίς Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172, 335
night, nocturnal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 175
nurse de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
nymph Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172, 175; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
nysa, nyseion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175
nysa de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
olympias Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175
olympus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
orgiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175
orpheus, literary author de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
orphic, see titans, zagreus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
orphism, orphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
pardalis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172
parodos, of bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
parodos, of edonoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
pentheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 336
performance Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 109
performativity Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 109
persephone Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
poetry de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
polis Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 110
pottery Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175
presence Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 112
procession (pompe) Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 109, 111
prodigies of dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 336
promise Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
pythia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175
resemblances, edonoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
resemblances Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
rhea Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
rite, ritual, female Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175
rite, ritual, maenadic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 172, 175
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 172, 175, 335
rome, roman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
sabazios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
semele Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 110; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
serpents Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175, 335, 336
sex, sexuality Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
skin, animal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172
snakes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175, 335, 336
sparagmos Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
speech de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
teiresias Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 336
thebes Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 109, 110, 111
thebes (boeotia) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
thiasos θίασος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162
thrace Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 15
thyrsus θύρσος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172, 335
torch, torchlight Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172, 175
tragedy, origins of Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 157
tragedy, tragic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 336
tyrannus, philoctetes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
vegetation Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 172
violence/violent Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 175
water Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 175
wine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 172, 175
woman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 162, 172, 175, 335
womb de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
women Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
worship Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
worshippers' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 335
zagreus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 63
zeus, and gaea Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
zeus, and rhea Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56
zeus, zeus lightning de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
zeus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 336; Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 111; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 56; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128