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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5614
Euripides, Bacchae, 1020-1023


ἴθʼ, ὦ Βάκχε, θηραγρευτᾷ βακχᾶνGo, Bacchus, with smiling face throw a deadly noose around the hunter of the Bacchae as he falls beneath the flock of Maenads. Second Messenger


γελῶντι προσώπῳ περίβαλε βρόχονGo, Bacchus, with smiling face throw a deadly noose around the hunter of the Bacchae as he falls beneath the flock of Maenads. Second Messenger


θανάσιμον ὑπʼ ἀγέλαν πεσόντι word split in text Go, Bacchus, with smiling face throw a deadly noose around the hunter of the Bacchae as he falls beneath the flock of Maenads. Second Messenger


τὰν μαινάδων. Ἄγγελος ΒGo, Bacchus, with smiling face throw a deadly noose around the hunter of the Bacchae as he falls beneath the flock of Maenads. Second Messenger


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

38 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.132 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.132. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus.
2. Homeric Hymns, To Pan, 46 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

3. Hymn To Dionysus, To Dionysus, 7.13-7.15 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

7.13. 3. Hereupon Titus ordered those whose business it was to read the list of all that had performed great exploits in this war 7.13. Then did he retire to that gate which was called the Gate of the Pomp, because pompous shows do always go through that gate; 7.14. whom he called to him by their names, and commended them before the company, and rejoiced in them in the same manner as a man would have rejoiced in his own exploits. He also put on their heads crowns of gold, and golden ornaments about their necks, and gave them long spears of gold, and ensigns that were made of silver 7.14. for many of them were so made, that they were on three or even four stories, one above another. The magnificence also of their structure afforded one both pleasure and surprise; 7.15. and removed every one of them to a higher rank; and besides this, he plentifully distributed among them, out of the spoils, and the other prey they had taken, silver, and gold, and garments. 7.15. and the last of all the spoils, was carried the Law of the Jews.
4. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 55 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

55. σέβας δʼ ἄμαχον ἀδάματον ἀπόλεμον τὸ πρὶν 55. The awe of majesty once unconquered, unvanquished, irresistible in war, that penetrated the ears and heart of the people, is now cast off. But there is still fear. And prosperity—this
5. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 25 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

25. ἐξ οὗτε Βάκχαις ἐστρατήγησεν θεός 25. ever since he, as a god, led the Bacchantes in war, and contrived for Pentheus death as of a hunted hare. I call on the streams of Pleistus and the strength of Poseidon, and highest Zeus, the Fulfiller; and then I take my seat as prophetess upon my throne.
6. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 498, 497 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

497. αὐτὸς δʼ ἐπηλάλαξεν, ἔνθεος δʼ Ἄρει
7. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 263 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

263. Φαλῆς ἑταῖρε Βακχίου
8. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 1313 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1313. θυρσαδδωᾶν καὶ παιδδωᾶν.
9. Aristophanes, Clouds, 605 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

605. Βάκχαις Δελφίσιν ἐμπρέπων
10. Aristophanes, Frogs, 412, 838-839, 1259 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1259. τὸν Βακχεῖον ἄνακτα
11. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 985-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. εὐπέταλος ἕλικι θάλλει.
12. Euripides, Bacchae, 1000-1009, 101, 1010-1019, 102, 1021-1029, 103, 1030-1039, 104, 1040-1049, 105, 1050-1059, 106, 1060-1069, 107, 1070-1079, 108, 1080-1089, 109, 1090-1099, 110, 1100-1109, 111, 1110-1119, 112, 1120-1129, 113, 1130-1139, 114, 1140-1149, 115, 1150-1153, 1159, 116, 1160, 1168, 117-118, 1189, 119-122, 1224, 123-138, 1387, 139-166, 169, 195, 225, 259, 288-289, 329, 366, 375, 413, 415, 437-440, 443-450, 485-486, 491, 499, 50-51, 526, 528-530, 576-619, 62, 620-639, 64, 640-649, 65, 650-656, 66, 664-669, 67, 670-671, 676-679, 68, 680-689, 69, 690-699, 70, 700-709, 71, 710-719, 72, 720-729, 73, 730-739, 74, 740-749, 75, 750-759, 76, 760-769, 77, 770-779, 78, 780-789, 79, 790-799, 80, 800-809, 81, 810-819, 82, 820-829, 83, 830-839, 84, 840-849, 85, 850-859, 86, 860-862, 87-91, 912-919, 92, 920-929, 93, 930-939, 94, 940-949, 95, 950-959, 96, 960-969, 97, 970-979, 98, 980-989, 99, 990-999, 100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. τέλεσαν, ταυρόκερων θεὸν 100. had perfected him, the bull-horned god, and he crowned him with crowns of snakes, for which reason Maenads cloak their wild prey over their locks. Choru
13. Euripides, Cyclops, 156, 38, 446, 64, 709, 72, 143 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

143. ὁ Βακχίου παῖς, ὡς σαφέστερον μάθῃς. 143. The son of the Bacchic god, that thou mayst learn more certainly. Silenu
14. Euripides, Hecuba, 121, 669, 1076 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1076. ποῖ πᾷ φέρομαι τέκν' ἔρημα λιπὼν
15. Euripides, Helen, 543 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

543. οὐχ ὡς δρομαία πῶλος ἢ Βάκχη θεοῦ
16. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1119 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1119. I will explain, if you are no longer mad as a fiend of hell. Heracle
17. Euripides, Hippolytus, 560, 551 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. Euripides, Ion, 550, 552-553, 716-717, 218 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

19. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 953, 164 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

20. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1489 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

21. Euripides, Rhesus, 972 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

972. As under far Pangaion Orpheus lies
22. Herodotus, Histories, 4.79 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4.79. But when things had to turn out badly for him, they did so for this reason: he conceived a desire to be initiated into the rites of the Bacchic Dionysus; and when he was about to begin the sacred mysteries, he saw the greatest vision. ,He had in the city of the Borysthenites a spacious house, grand and costly (the same house I just mentioned), all surrounded by sphinxes and griffins worked in white marble; this house was struck by a thunderbolt. And though the house burnt to the ground, Scyles none the less performed the rite to the end. ,Now the Scythians reproach the Greeks for this Bacchic revelling, saying that it is not reasonable to set up a god who leads men to madness. ,So when Scyles had been initiated into the Bacchic rite, some one of the Borysthenites scoffed at the Scythians: “You laugh at us, Scythians, because we play the Bacchant and the god possesses us; but now this deity has possessed your own king, so that he plays the Bacchant and is maddened by the god. If you will not believe me, follow me now and I will show him to you.” ,The leading men among the Scythians followed him, and the Borysthenite brought them up secretly onto a tower; from which, when Scyles passed by with his company of worshippers, they saw him playing the Bacchant; thinking it a great misfortune, they left the city and told the whole army what they had seen.
23. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

649d. and excessive audacity, and fearful of ever daring to say or suffer or do anything shameful. Clin. So it appears. Ath. And are not these the conditions in which we are of the character described,—anger, lust, insolence, ignorance, covetousness, and extravagance; and these also,—wealth, beauty, strength, and everything which intoxicates a man with pleasure and turns his head? And for the purpose, first, of providing a cheap and comparatively harmless test of these conditions, and, secondly, of affording practice in them, what more suitable pleasure can we mention than wine
24. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

69c. from all these things, and self-restraint and justice and courage and wisdom itself are a kind of purification. And I fancy that those men who established the mysteries were not unenlightened, but in reality had a hidden meaning when they said long ago that whoever goes uninitiated and unsanctified to the other world will lie in the mire, but he who arrives there initiated and purified will dwell with the gods. For as they say in the mysteries, the thyrsus-bearers are many, but the mystics few ;
25. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

253a. they seek after information themselves, and when they search eagerly within themselves to find the nature of their god, they are successful, because they have been compelled to keep their eyes fixed upon the god, and as they reach and grasp him by memory they are inspired and receive from him character and habits, so far as it is possible for a man to have part in God. Now they consider the beloved the cause of all this, so they love him more than before, and if they draw the waters of their inspiration from Zeus, like the bacchantes, they pour it out upon the beloved and make him, so far as possible, like their god.
26. Plato, Symposium, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

218b. a Pausanias, an Aristodemus, and an Aristophanes—I need not mention Socrates himself—and all the rest of them; every one of you has had his share of philosophic frenzy and transport, so all of you shall hear. You shall stand up alike for what then was done and for what now is spoken. But the domestics, and all else profane and clownish, must clap the heaviest of doors upon their ears.
27. Sophocles, Antigone, 1116-1152, 135-136, 148-154, 876, 963-964, 1115 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

28. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 209-215, 1105 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

29. Demosthenes, Orations, 21.52 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

30. Eratosthenes, Catasterismi, 24 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

31. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 4.5.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.5.1.  Many epithets, so we are informed, have been given him by men, who have found the occasions from which they arose in the practices and customs which have become associated with him. So, for instance, he has been called Baccheius from Bacchic bands of women who accompanied him, Lenaeus from the custom of treading the clusters of grapes in a wine-tub (lenos), and Bromius from the thunder (bromos) which attended his birth; likewise for a similar reason he has been called Pyrigenes ("Born-of‑Fire").
32. Philo of Alexandria, On Planting, 148 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

33. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 3.5.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.5.2. διελθὼν δὲ Θρᾴκην καὶ τὴν Ἰνδικὴν ἅπασαν, στήλας ἐκεῖ στήσας 1 -- ἧκεν εἰς Θήβας, καὶ τὰς γυναῖκας ἠνάγκασε καταλιπούσας τὰς οἰκίας βακχεύειν ἐν τῷ Κιθαιρῶνι. Πενθεὺς δὲ γεννηθεὶς ἐξ Ἀγαυῆς Ἐχίονι, παρὰ Κάδμου εἰληφὼς τὴν βασιλείαν, διεκώλυε ταῦτα γίνεσθαι, καὶ παραγενόμενος εἰς Κιθαιρῶνα τῶν Βακχῶν κατάσκοπος ὑπὸ τῆς μητρὸς Ἀγαυῆς κατὰ μανίαν ἐμελίσθη· ἐνόμισε γὰρ αὐτὸν θηρίον εἶναι. δείξας δὲ Θηβαίοις ὅτι θεός ἐστιν, ἧκεν εἰς Ἄργος, κἀκεῖ 2 -- πάλιν οὐ τιμώντων αὐτὸν ἐξέμηνε τὰς γυναῖκας. αἱ δὲ ἐν τοῖς ὄρεσι τοὺς ἐπιμαστιδίους ἔχουσαι 3 -- παῖδας τὰς σάρκας αὐτῶν ἐσιτοῦντο.
34. Antoninus Liberalis, Collection of Metamorphoses, 10.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

35. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 10.15.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.15.3. Then verily, having crossed the narrow strait of the Hellespont, The devastating host of the Gauls shall pipe; and lawlessly They shall ravage Asia ; and much worse shall God do To those who dwell by the shores of the sea For a short while. For right soon the son of Cronos Shall raise them a helper, the dear son of a bull reared by Zeus, Who on all the Gauls shall bring a day of destruction. By the son of a bull she meant Attalus, king of Pergamus, who was also styled bull-horned by an oracle.
36. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 40.44-40.45, 40.49, 40.56 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

37. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 474.15-474.16

38. Orphic Hymns., Hymni, 45.2, 52.1



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
agave Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 181
anti-hero, dionysus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
antigone Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
apollo, apollonian, apolline Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
argos, argive Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49, 333
asyndeton Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 181
athens, athenian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
bacchants, bacchae, bacchai Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 49
baccheia βακχεία Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
bacchic, bacchios, baccheios βάκχιος, βακχεῖος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 352
bacchus, bacchius Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 352, 357
bacchus, βάκχος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 49, 273
berezan Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
boukolos βουκόλος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
bull Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
chorus, in drama Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
chorus (male, female), of a. bassarae or bassarides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
chorus (male, female), of e. bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 181
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 49, 273, 333, 357
chthonic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 352
cithaeron Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 181
classical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
comedy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
creon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273, 322
dance, dancing, ecstatic, frenzied, maenadic, orgiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
dance, dancing Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
delirium Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
dionysia, great and rural (festivals) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
dionysos, awakening Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 357
dionysos, dionysos as bull Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
dionysos, dionysos axie taure Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
dionysos, dionysos bacchas Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
dionysos, dionysos baccheios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 273, 352
dionysos, dionysos baccheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49, 273, 352
dionysos, dionysos bacchios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 49, 273, 352
dionysos, dionysos bacchos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 49, 273, 352
dionysos, dionysos bougenes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
dionysos, dionysos boukeros Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
dionysos, dionysos boukolos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
dionysos, dionysos bromios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 357
dionysos, dionysos dithyrambos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 357
dionysos, dionysos elelichthon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
dionysos, dionysos mainomenos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49, 352
dionysos, dionysos taurometopos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
dionysos, dionysos tauropos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
dionysos, dionysos tauros diotrefes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
dionysos, dionysos xenos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 322
dionysos, epiphany Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49, 333, 357
dionysos, gift Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
dionysos, punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 49, 273, 322, 333, 352, 357
dionysus, as a bull/his bestial incarnation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
dionysus, illusion Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
ecstasy/ecstasis Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273, 352
elegy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
eleusis, eleusinian, mysteries Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 322
elis, sixteen/ women from Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
elis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
entheos ἔνθεος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
enthusiasm ἐνθουσιασμός, enthusiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
epigram Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
euphoria Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
euripides, bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49, 181
euripides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 181
fertility Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
festival, festivity, festive Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
fire Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
frenzy, frenzied Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 352
gift Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
great dionysia, city dionysia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
hallucination/delusion Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
heracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
hero Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
hipponion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
hubris Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
initiate Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273, 322
initiation, initiatory rites Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 322
judas, and pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 181
judas Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 181
justice (δίκη)/retribution (divine) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 181
leopard Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
lion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
lycurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
lydia, lydian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 357
lyric Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
madness, of heracles in heracles Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 180
madness, of pentheus in bacchae Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 180
madness Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 352
madness (mania)/frenzy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
maenads, maenadic, maenadism, rites/cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49, 352
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49, 322, 352, 357
maenads/maenadism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49, 181
maenads Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49, 322, 333, 352, 357
messenger Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
minyads, daughters of minyas psoloeis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
miracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
music, musical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
mysteries, mystery cults, bacchic, dionysiac Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 352
mystery Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
mystic, mystical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
night, nocturnal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
olbia/pontic olbia, olbian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
olympus, olympian, god Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
on stage Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
oracle, oracular Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
orpheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
orphism, orphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
parody Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49, 181
pelinna Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
pentheus, death Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 357
pentheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 322, 333, 357; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49, 181
performance Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 322
philosophy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
polis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273, 357
poseidon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
possession, possessed Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
priest, priesthood Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
procession Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
reception, of concepts and ideas Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 181
refiguration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
replacement/substitution of names Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 181
resemblances, bassarae/bassarides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
resemblances, edonoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
resemblances, reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 181
resemblances Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 181
rite, ritual, maenadic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49, 352
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49, 322, 352
satyr drama, satyr-play Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41
scylas Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
scythia, scythian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49
semele Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
serpents Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
socrates Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 180
sparagmos/dismemberment Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 181
sparagmos Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
temple Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49, 273, 322
thebes (boeotia) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
theomachos (–oi)/theomachia/theomachein Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49, 181
theotokos (mother of god) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 181
thiasos θίασος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49, 273
tragedy, tragic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 273, 352, 357
violence/violent Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 352
wine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 41, 49, 333, 357
woman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 49, 322, 333, 352
women Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
worship Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273, 333
worshippers' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
xenia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 322
zeus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 357