Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5611
Euripides, Andromache, 1117
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

30 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 20.353 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Homer, Odyssey, 14.434-14.436 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 107-109, 106 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

106. ἦ πολλὰ μὲν δὴ τῶν ἐμῶν ἐλείξατε
4. Aeschylus, Persians, 203-204, 202 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

202. ἔψαυσα πηγῆς, σὺν θυηπόλῳ χερὶ
5. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 7.34, 7.42-7.47 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 246-249, 148 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

148. ὁ δ' ὤμοσε σπένδων βοηθήσειν ἔχων
7. Aristophanes, Clouds, 274 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

274. ὑπακούσατε δεξάμεναι θυσίαν καὶ τοῖς ἱεροῖσι χαρεῖσαι.
8. Aristophanes, Peace, 1013-1014, 1023-1126, 1172-1178, 1186, 1229, 1253, 1264, 1275, 1290, 433, 976, 1009 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1009. τένθαις πολλοῖς: κᾆτα Μελάνθιον
9. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 1137-1138, 677-678, 820, 1136 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1136. εἴ μοι πορίσας ἄρτον τιν' εὖ πεπεμμένον
10. Euripides, Alcestis, 426-429, 611-612, 614-635, 743-744, 862-863, 866-867, 869-871, 897-902, 911, 916-919, 922, 926-928, 425 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

425. Ho! sirrahs, catch me this woman; hold her fast; for ’tis no welcome story she will have to hear. It was to make thee leave the holy altar of the goddess that I held thy child’s death before thy eyes, and so induced thee to give thyself up to me to die.
11. Euripides, Andromache, 1000-1008, 1032, 1064, 1075, 1085-1116, 1118-1172, 1176, 1187, 1211, 1218, 1226-1272, 147-273, 309-319, 32, 320-332, 334-351, 361-363, 381, 41, 43-44, 445-463, 47-48, 518, 53, 547-746, 763, 805, 854, 922-928, 993-999, 10 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. ῥιφθέντα πύργων ̓Αστυάνακτ' ἀπ' ὀρθίων
12. Euripides, Bacchae, 1217-1226, 1285, 1300-1329, 1216 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1216. ἕπεσθέ μοι φέροντες ἄθλιον βάρος 1216. Follow me, carrying the miserable burden of Pentheus, follow me, slaves, before the house; exhausted from countless searches, I am bringing his body, for I discovered it in the folds of Kithairon
13. Euripides, Electra, 1277-1280, 439, 713-726, 785-814, 1276 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1276. σοὶ μὲν τάδ' εἶπον: τόνδε δ' Αἰγίσθου νέκυν
14. Euripides, Hecuba, 1288, 25-50, 610, 616, 675, 678-680, 684-732, 894-897, 1287 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1287. ̔Εκάβη, σὺ δ', ὦ τάλαινα, διπτύχους νεκροὺς
15. Euripides, Helen, 1243, 1260, 1291-1300, 1390-1395, 1400, 1408, 1419, 1528, 1542-1604, 1240 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1240. τί δ'; ἔστ' ἀπόντων τύμβος; ἢ θάψεις σκιάν; 1240. What? Is there a tomb for the absent? Or will you bury a shadow? Helen
16. Euripides, Children of Heracles, 1027-1045, 1159-1162, 1026 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1026. rend= Bury my body after death in its destined grave in front of the shrine of the virgin goddess Pallas. at Pallene. And I will be thy friend and guardian of thy city for ever, where I lie buried in a foreign soil, but a bitter foe to these children’s descendants, whensoe’er Referring to invasions by the Peloponnesians, descendants of the Heracleidae. with gathered host they come against this land, traitors to your kindness now; such are the strangers ye have championed. Why then came I hither, if I knew all this, instead of regarding the god’s oracle? Because I thought, that Hera was mightier far than any oracle, and would not betray me. Waste no drink-offering on my tomb, nor spill the victim’s blood; for I will requite them for my treatment here with a journey they shall rue; and ye shall have double gain from me, for I will help you and harm them by my death. Alcmena 1026. Slay me, I do not ask thee for mercy; yet since this city let me go and shrunk from slaying me, I will reward it with an old oracle of Loxias, which in time will benefit them more than doth appear.
17. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1359-1366, 922-930, 1358 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. Euripides, Ion, 185-189, 196-197, 184 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

184. It is not in holy Athen
19. Euripides, Medea, 1378-1383, 1377 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1377. Give up to me those dead, to bury and lament Medea
20. Euripides, Orestes, 1431-1436, 97-99, 114 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

21. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1486-1529, 1485 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1485. I do not veil my tender cheek shaded with curls, nor do I feel shame, from maiden modesty, at the dark red beneath my eyes, the blush upon my face, as I hurry on, in bacchic revelry for the dead
22. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 290, 754-759, 778-836, 841-843, 846-931, 934-935, 950-954, 1200 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1200. enjoined thee to set up at the Pythian shrine. O’er it cut the throats of three sheep; then grave within the tripod’s hollow belly the oath; this done, deliver it to the god who watches over Delphi to keep, a witness and memorial unto Hellas of the oath.
23. Euripides, Trojan Women, 1134-1146, 1156-1206, 1240-1245, 1248-1250, 15-17, 481-483, 735-739, 1133 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

24. Herodotus, Histories, 1.31.4, 6.61 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.31.4. She was overjoyed at the feat and at the praise, so she stood before the image and prayed that the goddess might grant the best thing for man to her children Cleobis and Biton, who had given great honor to the goddess. 6.61. While Cleomenes was in Aegina working for the common good of Hellas, Demaratus slandered him, not out of care for the Aeginetans, but out of jealousy and envy. Once Cleomenes returned home from Aegina, he planned to remove Demaratus from his kingship, using the following affair as a pretext against him: Ariston, king of Sparta, had married twice but had no children. ,He did not admit that he himself was responsible, so he married a third time. This is how it came about: he had among the Spartans a friend to whom he was especially attached. This man's wife was by far the most beautiful woman in Sparta, but she who was now most beautiful had once been the ugliest. ,Her nurse considered her inferior looks and how she was of wealthy people yet unattractive, and, seeing how the parents felt her appearance to be a great misfortune, she contrived to carry the child every day to the sacred precinct of Helen, which is in the place called Therapne, beyond the sacred precinct of Phoebus. Every time the nurse carried the child there, she set her beside the image and beseeched the goddess to release the child from her ugliness. ,Once as she was leaving the sacred precinct, it is said that a woman appeared to her and asked her what she was carrying in her arms. The nurse said she was carrying a child and the woman bade her show it to her, but she refused, saying that the parents had forbidden her to show it to anyone. But the woman strongly bade her show it to her, ,and when the nurse saw how important it was to her, she showed her the child. The woman stroked the child's head and said that she would be the most beautiful woman in all Sparta. From that day her looks changed, and when she reached the time for marriage, Agetus son of Alcidas married her. This man was Ariston's friend.
25. Menander, Dyscolus, 494 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

26. Theocritus, Idylls, 15.140 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

27. Strabo, Geography, 9.3.9 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9.3.9. of the temples, the one with wings must be placed among the myths; the second is said to be the work of Trophonius and Agamedes; and the present temple was built by the Amphictyons. In the sacred precinct is to be seen the tomb of Neoptolemus, which was made in accordance with an oracle, Machaereus, a Delphian, having slain him because, according to the myth, he was asking the god for redress for the murder of his father; but according to all probability it was because he had attacked the sanctuary. Branchus, who presided over the sanctuary at Didyma, is called a descendant of Machaereus.
28. Vergil, Aeneis, 2.501-2.502, 3.330-3.332 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.501. thus, all unchallenged, hailed us as his own : 2.502. “Haste, heroes! Are ye laggards at this hour? 3.330. from every quarter flew, and seized its prey 3.331. with taloned feet and carrion lip most foul. 3.332. I called my mates to arms and opened war
29. Heliodorus, Ethiopian Story, 2.34 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

30. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.26.6, 10.7.1, 10.25, 10.26.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.26.6. Both the city and the whole of the land are alike sacred to Athena; for even those who in their parishes have an established worship of other gods nevertheless hold Athena in honor. But the most holy symbol, that was so considered by all many years before the unification of the parishes, is the image of Athena which is on what is now called the Acropolis, but in early days the Polis (City). A legend concerning it says that it fell from heaven; whether this is true or not I shall not discuss. A golden lamp for the goddess was made by Callimachus fl. 400 B.C. ? 10.7.1. It seems that from the beginning the sanctuary at Delphi has been plotted against by a vast number of men. Attacks were made against it by this Euboean pirate, and years afterwards by the Phlegyan nation; furthermore by Pyrrhus, son of Achilles, by a portion of the army of Xerxes, by the Phocian chieftains, whose attacks on the wealth of the god were the longest and fiercest, and by the Gallic invaders. It was fated too that Delphi was to suffer from the universal irreverence of Nero, who robbed Apollo of five hundred bronze statues, some of gods, some of men. 10.26.4. Under those who are administering the oath to Ajax, and in a line with the horse by Nestor, is Neoptolemus, who has killed Elasus, whoever Elasus may be. Elasus is represented as a man only just alive. Astynous, who is also mentioned by Lescheos, has fallen to his knees, and Neoptolemus is striking him with a sword. Neoptolemus is the only one of the Greek army represented by Polygnotus as still killing the Trojans, the reason being that he intended the whole painting to be placed over the grave of Neoptolemus. The son of Achilles is named Neoptolemus by Homer in all his poetry. The epic poem, however, called Cypria says that Lycomedes named him Pyrrhus, but Phoenix gave him the name of Neoptolemus (young soldier) because Achilles was but young when he first went to war.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, successors, pyrrhus, king of epirus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
achilles, successors, turnus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
achilles Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211; Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 171, 172
acropolis Ward, Searching for the Divine in Plato and Aristotle: Philosophical Theoria and Traditional Practice (2021) 32
action (danced) Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 165, 173, 174
aegisthus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
aeneas, narrator Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
aeneas, reader Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
aeschylus, local, in panhellenic ritual setting Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
aeschylus, seven against thebes Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 105
aetiology Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
agamemnon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
aiakos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
aigina, aiginetans Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
ainianes, and neoptolemos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
alcestis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
altar Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 43, 44
amphiktyony, delphic, and neoptolemos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
amphiktyony, delphic, contested rule Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
amphiktyony, delphic Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
andromache Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211; Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 160, 161; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 140, 144, 148, 679, 834
apollo Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 140, 679
apollo pythios (delphi) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
apollon Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 43, 44
aristophanes Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
artemis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 679
ash-altar, relation bomos-eschara-. Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 43
ash-altar, surface or upper part of Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 43, 44
athena, athena polias Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 105
athena, polias Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 44
athens, and identity Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 66
athens Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 160; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 144, 834
atreus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
aversion Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 43
bribery Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
characterisation Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 166
children of heracles (heraclidae) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
chorus, ancient, euripidean Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 165, 166, 171, 172
chorus, ancient, greek, tragic Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 161
cult activities Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 105
cult images Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 105
dance, round / circular Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 165, 171
de jong, i. Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 66
death Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
death as a spectacle Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 166, 173
deception, and tragedy Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 66
delphi Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 161, 164, 165, 166; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 140, 148, 679, 834; Ward, Searching for the Divine in Plato and Aristotle: Philosophical Theoria and Traditional Practice (2021) 32
demeter Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 44
deus ex machina Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 140
didaskalos (διδάσκαλος) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 144
dining, sacrifices not followed by dining Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 43
dionysia, city (great) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 144
dionysus Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 160
distance, aesthetic Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 170
dithyramb Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 161
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
eleusis Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 44
empathy, kinesthetic Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 163
enactment Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 164
ennius (quintus ennius) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
erinyes Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 43
ethical qualities, treachery Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
eumenides Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 43
euripides, andromache Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 66
euripides, contemporary resonances Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 66
euripides, on spartans Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 66
euripides Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78; Ward, Searching for the Divine in Plato and Aristotle: Philosophical Theoria and Traditional Practice (2021) 32
feasting, and (exclusive) cult community Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
feet Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 171, 172
fire Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 43
funerals Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
funerary, local myth in panhellenic Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
furies Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
gaze Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 170
greeks Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
haloa Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 44
hecuba (hecabe) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
helen Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
hera Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
heracles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
hero-cult Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
hero Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
herodotus Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 105
horse, trojan Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 171, 172
image Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 679
insular, panhellenic Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
intertextuality Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
iphigenia in tauris Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
kings Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
kitto, h. Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 66
klytaimnestra Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 43
kore Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 44
language, choreographic Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 174
lavinia Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
leaping Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 171, 172, 173
lesky, a. Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 66
literature, greek, ancient Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174
locality, and panhellenism Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
lucas, d. Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 66
marriage Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
medea Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
memories, kept alive or evoked in ritual, contested, of conflict Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
menelaus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211; Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 66
myth, and unjustly acquired power Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
mêchanê Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
narrative, dramatic Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174
neoptolemos, and sacred war Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
neoptolemos, and shares in delphic (theoric) sacrifice Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
neoptolemos, death at and cult delphi Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
neoptolemos, sack of delphi Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
neoptolemos, unable to supersede apollos enmity Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
neoptolemos Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 43, 44; Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
neoptolemus Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174; Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 66; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
nomos Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
oath, sacrifices at oath-taking Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 44
odysseus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
orestes Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211; Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 66
panhellenic sanctuaries, not quite panhellenic Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
panhellenism, delphi and Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
panhellenism, expressed in song Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
panhellenism, panhellenic cult community, forging of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
panhellenism Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
paris Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
pausanias (author) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
peleus Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 166, 174; Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 66
piedmont, and neoptolemos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
plots Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
poets, creativity in social contexts Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
poseidon, helikonios Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 44
posture Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 163, 167
prayers Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 105
priam Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 161, 173
priestess Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 44
pyrrhichē Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174
pyrrhus/neoptolemus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
quarrel Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
rehm, r. xxv Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
reperformance Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 160, 161
ritual Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
romans Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
rutherford, i. Ward, Searching for the Divine in Plato and Aristotle: Philosophical Theoria and Traditional Practice (2021) 32
sacrilege Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
sanctuaries, controversial control of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
sanctuaries, from local to theoric Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
scharffenberger, e.w. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 140, 144, 148
sense Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 170, 174
shape / form Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 165
shares, sacrificial (delphi), defining religious community at theoxenia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
slaves Ward, Searching for the Divine in Plato and Aristotle: Philosophical Theoria and Traditional Practice (2021) 32
social change, memory of maintained in religious practice Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
spartans, in euripides andromache Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 66
spectatorship, and affect Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 163
spectatorship, of ancient performance Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 172, 173, 174
statues, as vessel Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 105
story Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
strabo Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
structure Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
success Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
suppliant women (supplices) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
symposium Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 169, 170
theoros (observer) Ward, Searching for the Divine in Plato and Aristotle: Philosophical Theoria and Traditional Practice (2021) 32
theoxenia, delphi, defining hellenicity (greekness) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
theoxenia, delphi, neoptolemos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
theoxenia, delphi Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
tragedy, and deception Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 66
tragedy, attic/greek Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 160
tragedy, greek Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
tragedy as source of sacrificial rituals Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 44
trojan women (troades) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
trojans Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
troy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
turnus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
vessel, statue as Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 105
war, warfare Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 211
weddings Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Euripides (2015) 834
whirling Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 171
wineless sacrifice' Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 43
women and traditional theoria Ward, Searching for the Divine in Plato and Aristotle: Philosophical Theoria and Traditional Practice (2021) 32
xenia rituals Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199
xuthus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
zeus hellanios Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 199