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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



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Eratosthenes, Catasterismi, 24
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34 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.130-6.140, 18.394-18.408 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.130. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.131. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.132. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.133. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.134. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.135. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.136. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.137. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.138. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.139. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.140. /and he lived not for long, seeing that he was hated of all the immortal gods. So would not I be minded to fight against the blessed gods. But if thou art of men, who eat the fruit of the field, draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. Then spake to him the glorious son of Hippolochus: 18.394. /a beautiful chair, richly-wrought, and beneath was a footstool for the feet; and she called to Hephaestus, the famed craftsman, and spake to him, saying:Hephaestus, come forth hither; Thetis hath need of thee. And the famous god of the two strong arms answered her:Verily then a dread and honoured goddess is within my halls 18.395. /even she that saved me when pain was come upon me after I had fallen afar through the will of my shameless mother, that was fain to hide me away by reason of my lameness. Then had I suffered woes in heart, had not Eurynome and Thetis received me into their bosom—Eurynome, daughter of backward-flowing Oceanus. 18.396. /even she that saved me when pain was come upon me after I had fallen afar through the will of my shameless mother, that was fain to hide me away by reason of my lameness. Then had I suffered woes in heart, had not Eurynome and Thetis received me into their bosom—Eurynome, daughter of backward-flowing Oceanus. 18.397. /even she that saved me when pain was come upon me after I had fallen afar through the will of my shameless mother, that was fain to hide me away by reason of my lameness. Then had I suffered woes in heart, had not Eurynome and Thetis received me into their bosom—Eurynome, daughter of backward-flowing Oceanus. 18.398. /even she that saved me when pain was come upon me after I had fallen afar through the will of my shameless mother, that was fain to hide me away by reason of my lameness. Then had I suffered woes in heart, had not Eurynome and Thetis received me into their bosom—Eurynome, daughter of backward-flowing Oceanus. 18.399. /even she that saved me when pain was come upon me after I had fallen afar through the will of my shameless mother, that was fain to hide me away by reason of my lameness. Then had I suffered woes in heart, had not Eurynome and Thetis received me into their bosom—Eurynome, daughter of backward-flowing Oceanus. 18.400. /With them then for nine years' space I forged much cunning handiwork, brooches, and spiral arm-bands, and rosettes and necklaces, within their hollow cave; and round about me flowed, murmuring with foam, the stream of Oceanus, a flood unspeakable. Neither did any other know thereof, either of gods or of mortal men 18.401. /With them then for nine years' space I forged much cunning handiwork, brooches, and spiral arm-bands, and rosettes and necklaces, within their hollow cave; and round about me flowed, murmuring with foam, the stream of Oceanus, a flood unspeakable. Neither did any other know thereof, either of gods or of mortal men 18.402. /With them then for nine years' space I forged much cunning handiwork, brooches, and spiral arm-bands, and rosettes and necklaces, within their hollow cave; and round about me flowed, murmuring with foam, the stream of Oceanus, a flood unspeakable. Neither did any other know thereof, either of gods or of mortal men 18.403. /With them then for nine years' space I forged much cunning handiwork, brooches, and spiral arm-bands, and rosettes and necklaces, within their hollow cave; and round about me flowed, murmuring with foam, the stream of Oceanus, a flood unspeakable. Neither did any other know thereof, either of gods or of mortal men 18.404. /With them then for nine years' space I forged much cunning handiwork, brooches, and spiral arm-bands, and rosettes and necklaces, within their hollow cave; and round about me flowed, murmuring with foam, the stream of Oceanus, a flood unspeakable. Neither did any other know thereof, either of gods or of mortal men 18.405. /but Thetis knew and Eurynome, even they that saved me. And now is Thetis come to my house; wherefore it verily behoveth me to pay unto fair-tressed Thetis the full price for the saving of my life. But do thou set before her fair entertainment, while I put aside my bellows and all my tools. 18.406. /but Thetis knew and Eurynome, even they that saved me. And now is Thetis come to my house; wherefore it verily behoveth me to pay unto fair-tressed Thetis the full price for the saving of my life. But do thou set before her fair entertainment, while I put aside my bellows and all my tools. 18.407. /but Thetis knew and Eurynome, even they that saved me. And now is Thetis come to my house; wherefore it verily behoveth me to pay unto fair-tressed Thetis the full price for the saving of my life. But do thou set before her fair entertainment, while I put aside my bellows and all my tools. 18.408. /but Thetis knew and Eurynome, even they that saved me. And now is Thetis come to my house; wherefore it verily behoveth me to pay unto fair-tressed Thetis the full price for the saving of my life. But do thou set before her fair entertainment, while I put aside my bellows and all my tools.
2. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 26, 25 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

25. ἐξ οὗτε Βάκχαις ἐστρατήγησεν θεός 25. ever since he, as a god, led the Bacchantes in war, and contrived for Pentheus death as of a hunted hare. I call on the streams of Pleistus and the strength of Poseidon, and highest Zeus, the Fulfiller; and then I take my seat as prophetess upon my throne.
3. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 101-147, 78-100 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. ἀκούετʼ ἢ οὐκ ἀκούετʼ ἀσπίδων κτύπον; 100. Do you hear the clash of shields, or does it escape you? When, if not now, shall we place sacred robes and wreaths on the statues to accompany our prayers? I see the clash—it is not the clatter of a single spear. What will you do? Will you betray
4. Aristophanes, Birds, 694-702, 693 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

693. Χάος ἦν καὶ Νὺξ ̓́Ερεβός τε μέλαν πρῶτον καὶ Τάρταρος εὐρύς
5. Aristophanes, Frogs, 1032 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1032. ̓Ορφεὺς μὲν γὰρ τελετάς θ' ἡμῖν κατέδειξε φόνων τ' ἀπέχεσθαι
6. Euripides, Alcestis, 358-362, 357 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Bacchae, 1000-1023, 1159, 1216-1300, 275, 337-340, 519-546, 550-656, 664-671, 676-861, 918-922, 977-999, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. ἥκω Διὸς παῖς τήνδε Θηβαίων χθόνα 1. I, the son of Zeus, have come to this land of the Thebans—Dionysus, whom once Semele, Kadmos’ daughter, bore, delivered by a lightning-bearing flame. And having taken a mortal form instead of a god’s
8. Euripides, Helen, 1301 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1301. ̓Ορεία ποτὲ δρομάδι κώ- 1301. Once with swift foot the mountain mother of the gods rushed through the wooded glen, and the river’s stream
9. Euripides, Hippolytus, 953-955, 952 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Euripides, Ion, 1123-1128, 550-553, 714-718, 1122 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1122. Soon as Xuthus, husband of Creusa, had left the god’s prophetic shrine, taking with him his new-found son, to hold the feast and sacrifice that he designed to offer to the gods
11. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 685 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

685. goddess Demeter the queen of all, Earth the nurse of all, won it for themselves; send to the help of this land those torch-bearing goddesses; for to gods all things are easy. Eteocles to an attendant
12. Euripides, Rhesus, 971-973, 970 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

970. Alone for ever, in a caverned place
13. Herodotus, Histories, 2.81, 2.144, 7.111 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.81. They wear linen tunics with fringes hanging about the legs, called “calasiris,” and loose white woolen mantles over these. But nothing woolen is brought into temples, or buried with them: that is impious. ,They agree in this with practices called Orphic and Bacchic, but in fact Egyptian and Pythagorean: for it is impious, too, for one partaking of these rites to be buried in woolen wrappings. There is a sacred legend about this. 2.144. Thus they showed that all those whose statues stood there had been good men, but quite unlike gods. ,Before these men, they said, the rulers of Egypt were gods, but none had been contemporary with the human priests. of these gods one or another had in succession been supreme; the last of them to rule the country was Osiris' son Horus, whom the Greeks call Apollo; he deposed Typhon, and was the last divine king of Egypt . Osiris is, in the Greek language, Dionysus. 7.111. The Satrae, as far as we know, have never yet been subject to any man; they alone of the Thracians have continued living in freedom to this day; they dwell on high mountains covered with forests of all kinds and snow, and they are excellent warriors. ,It is they who possess the place of divination sacred to Dionysus. This place is in their highest mountains; the Bessi, a clan of the Satrae, are the prophets of the shrine; there is a priestess who utters the oracle, as at Delphi; it is no more complicated here than there.
14. Sophocles, Antigone, 955-965, 1126 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Hecataeus Abderita, Fragments, None (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

16. Hecataeus Abderita, Fragments, None (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

17. Conon, Fragments, 45 (1st cent. BCE

18. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.96.4, 3.65.5-3.65.6, 5.52 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.96.4.  Orpheus, for instance, brought from Egypt most of his mystic ceremonies, the orgiastic rites that accompanied his wanderings, and his fabulous account of his experiences in Hades. 3.65.5.  Consequently he sailed across secretly to his army, and then Lycurgus, they say, falling upon the Maenads in the city known as Nysium, slew them all, but Dionysus, bringing his forces over, conquered the Thracians in a battle, and taking Lycurgus alive put out his eyes and inflicted upon him every kind of outrage, and then crucified him. 3.65.6.  Thereupon, out of gratitude to Charops for the aid the man had rendered him, Dionysus made over to him the kingdom of the Thracians and instructed him in the secret rites connected with the initiations; and Oeagrus, the son of Charops, then took over both the kingdom and the initiatory rites which were handed down in the mysteries, the rites which afterwards Orpheus, the son of Oeagrus, who was the superior of all men in natural gifts and education, learned from his father; Orpheus also made many changes in the practices and for that reason the rites which had been established by Dionysus were also called "Orphic. 5.52. 1.  The myth which the Naxians have to relate about Dionysus is like this: He was reared, they say, in their country, and for this reason the island has been most dear to him and is called by some Dionysias.,2.  For according to the myth which has been handed down to us, Zeus, on the occasion when Semelê had been slain by his lightning before the time for bearing the child, took the babe and sewed it up within his thigh, and when the appointed time came for its birth, wishing to keep the matter concealed from Hera, he took the babe from his thigh in what is now Naxos and gave it to the Nymphs of the island, Philia, Coronis, and Cleidê, to be reared. The reason Zeus slew Semelê with his lightning before she could give birth to her child was his desire that the babe should be born, not of a mortal woman but of two immortals, and thus should be immortal from its very birth.,3.  And because of the kindness which the inhabitants of Naxos had shown to Dionysus in connection with his rearing they received marks of his gratitude; for the island increased in prosperity and fitted out notable naval forces, and the Naxians were the first to withdraw from the naval forces of Xerxes and to aid in the defeat at sea which the barbarian suffered, and they participated with distinction in the battle of Plataeae. Also the wine of the island possesses an excellence which is peculiarly its own and offers proof of the friendship which the god entertains for the island.
19. Horace, Ars Poetica, 392-393, 391 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

20. Hyginus, Astronomica, 2.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

21. Hyginus, Fabulae (Genealogiae), 132 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

22. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 4.1-4.41, 4.389-4.415 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

23. Strabo, Geography, 10.3.16 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10.3.16. Also resembling these rites are the Cotytian and the Bendideian rites practiced among the Thracians, among whom the Orphic rites had their beginning. Now the Cotys who is worshipped among the Edonians, and also the instruments used in her rites, are mentioned by Aeschylus; for he says,O adorable Cotys among the Edonians, and ye who hold mountain-ranging instruments; and he mentions immediately afterwards the attendants of Dionysus: one, holding in his hands the bombyces, toilsome work of the turner's chisel, fills full the fingered melody, the call that brings on frenzy, while another causes to resound the bronze-bound cotylae and again,stringed instruments raise their shrill cry, and frightful mimickers from some place unseen bellow like bulls, and the semblance of drums, as of subterranean thunder, rolls along, a terrifying sound; for these rites resemble the Phrygian rites, and it is at least not unlikely that, just as the Phrygians themselves were colonists from Thrace, so also their sacred rites were borrowed from there. Also when they identify Dionysus and the Edonian Lycurgus, they hint at the homogeneity of their sacred rites.
24. Vergil, Georgics, 4.520-4.527 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.520. To bristly boar, fell tigress, dragon scaled 4.521. And tawny-tufted lioness, or send forth 4.522. A crackling sound of fire, and so shake of 4.523. The fetters, or in showery drops anon 4.524. Dissolve and vanish. But the more he shift 4.525. His endless transformations, thou, my son 4.526. More straitlier clench the clinging bands, until 4.527. His body's shape return to that thou sawest
25. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 2.2.2, 3.5.1-3.5.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.2.2. καὶ γίνεται Ἀκρισίῳ μὲν ἐξ Εὐρυδίκης τῆς Λακεδαίμονος Δανάη, Προίτῳ δὲ ἐκ Σθενεβοίας Λυσίππη καὶ Ἰφινόη καὶ Ἰφιάνασσα. αὗται δὲ ὡς ἐτελειώθησαν, ἐμάνησαν, ὡς μὲν Ἡσίοδός φησιν, ὅτι τὰς Διονύσου τελετὰς οὐ κατεδέχοντο, ὡς δὲ Ἀκουσίλαος λέγει, διότι τὸ τῆς Ἥρας ξόανον ἐξηυτέλισαν. γενόμεναι δὲ ἐμμανεῖς ἐπλανῶντο ἀνὰ τὴν Ἀργείαν ἅπασαν, αὖθις δὲ τὴν Ἀρκαδίαν καὶ τὴν Πελοπόννησον 1 -- διελθοῦσαι μετʼ ἀκοσμίας ἁπάσης διὰ τῆς ἐρημίας ἐτρόχαζον. Μελάμπους δὲ ὁ Ἀμυθάονος καὶ Εἰδομένης τῆς Ἄβαντος, μάντις ὢν καὶ τὴν διὰ φαρμάκων καὶ καθαρμῶν θεραπείαν πρῶτος εὑρηκώς, ὑπισχνεῖται θεραπεύειν τὰς παρθένους, εἰ λάβοι τὸ τρίτον μέρος τῆς δυναστείας. οὐκ ἐπιτρέποντος δὲ Προίτου θεραπεύειν ἐπὶ μισθοῖς τηλικούτοις, ἔτι μᾶλλον ἐμαίνοντο αἱ παρθένοι καὶ προσέτι μετὰ τούτων αἱ λοιπαὶ γυναῖκες· καὶ γὰρ αὗται τὰς οἰκίας ἀπολιποῦσαι τοὺς ἰδίους ἀπώλλυον παῖδας καὶ εἰς τὴν ἐρημίαν ἐφοίτων. προβαινούσης δὲ ἐπὶ πλεῖστον τῆς συμφορᾶς, τοὺς αἰτηθέντας μισθοὺς ὁ Προῖτος ἐδίδου. ὁ δὲ ὑπέσχετο θεραπεύειν ὅταν ἕτερον τοσοῦτον τῆς γῆς ὁ ἀδελφὸς αὐτοῦ λάβῃ Βίας. Προῖτος δὲ εὐλαβηθεὶς μὴ βραδυνούσης τῆς θεραπείας αἰτηθείη καὶ πλεῖον, θεραπεύειν συνεχώρησεν ἐπὶ τούτοις. Μελάμπους δὲ παραλαβὼν τοὺς δυνατωτάτους τῶν νεανιῶν μετʼ ἀλαλαγμοῦ καί τινος ἐνθέου χορείας ἐκ τῶν ὀρῶν αὐτὰς εἰς Σικυῶνα συνεδίωξε. κατὰ δὲ τὸν διωγμὸν ἡ πρεσβυτάτη τῶν θυγατέρων Ἰφινόη μετήλλαξεν· ταῖς δὲ λοιπαῖς τυχούσαις καθαρμῶν σωφρονῆσαι συνέβη. καὶ ταύτας μὲν ἐξέδοτο Προῖτος Μελάμποδι καὶ Βίαντι, παῖδα δʼ ὕστερον ἐγέννησε Μεγαπένθην. 3.5.1. Διόνυσος δὲ εὑρετὴς ἀμπέλου γενόμενος, Ἥρας μανίαν αὐτῷ ἐμβαλούσης περιπλανᾶται Αἴγυπτόν τε καὶ Συρίαν. καὶ τὸ μὲν πρῶτον Πρωτεὺς αὐτὸν ὑποδέχεται βασιλεὺς Αἰγυπτίων, αὖθις δὲ εἰς Κύβελα τῆς Φρυγίας ἀφικνεῖται, κἀκεῖ καθαρθεὶς ὑπὸ Ῥέας καὶ τὰς τελετὰς ἐκμαθών, καὶ λαβὼν παρʼ ἐκείνης τὴν στολήν, ἐπὶ Ἰνδοὺς 1 -- διὰ τῆς Θράκης ἠπείγετο. Λυκοῦργος δὲ παῖς Δρύαντος, Ἠδωνῶν βασιλεύων, οἳ Στρυμόνα ποταμὸν παροικοῦσι, πρῶτος ὑβρίσας ἐξέβαλεν αὐτόν. καὶ Διόνυσος μὲν εἰς θάλασσαν πρὸς Θέτιν τὴν Νηρέως κατέφυγε, Βάκχαι δὲ ἐγένοντο αἰχμάλωτοι καὶ τὸ συνεπόμενον Σατύρων πλῆθος αὐτῷ. αὖθις δὲ αἱ Βάκχαι ἐλύθησαν ἐξαίφνης, Λυκούργῳ δὲ μανίαν ἐνεποίησε 2 -- Διόνυσος. ὁ δὲ μεμηνὼς Δρύαντα τὸν παῖδα, ἀμπέλου νομίζων κλῆμα κόπτειν, πελέκει πλήξας ἀπέκτεινε, καὶ ἀκρωτηριάσας αὐτὸν ἐσωφρόνησε. 1 -- τῆς δὲ γῆς ἀκάρπου μενούσης, ἔχρησεν ὁ θεὸς καρποφορήσειν αὐτήν, ἂν θανατωθῇ Λυκοῦργος. Ἠδωνοὶ δὲ ἀκούσαντες εἰς τὸ Παγγαῖον αὐτὸν ἀπαγαγόντες ὄρος ἔδησαν, κἀκεῖ κατὰ Διονύσου βούλησιν ὑπὸ ἵππων διαφθαρεὶς ἀπέθανε. 3.5.2. διελθὼν δὲ Θρᾴκην καὶ τὴν Ἰνδικὴν ἅπασαν, στήλας ἐκεῖ στήσας 1 -- ἧκεν εἰς Θήβας, καὶ τὰς γυναῖκας ἠνάγκασε καταλιπούσας τὰς οἰκίας βακχεύειν ἐν τῷ Κιθαιρῶνι. Πενθεὺς δὲ γεννηθεὶς ἐξ Ἀγαυῆς Ἐχίονι, παρὰ Κάδμου εἰληφὼς τὴν βασιλείαν, διεκώλυε ταῦτα γίνεσθαι, καὶ παραγενόμενος εἰς Κιθαιρῶνα τῶν Βακχῶν κατάσκοπος ὑπὸ τῆς μητρὸς Ἀγαυῆς κατὰ μανίαν ἐμελίσθη· ἐνόμισε γὰρ αὐτὸν θηρίον εἶναι. δείξας δὲ Θηβαίοις ὅτι θεός ἐστιν, ἧκεν εἰς Ἄργος, κἀκεῖ 2 -- πάλιν οὐ τιμώντων αὐτὸν ἐξέμηνε τὰς γυναῖκας. αἱ δὲ ἐν τοῖς ὄρεσι τοὺς ἐπιμαστιδίους ἔχουσαι 3 -- παῖδας τὰς σάρκας αὐτῶν ἐσιτοῦντο.
26. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

27. Plutarch, Greek Questions, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

28. Plutarch, Table Talk, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

29. Aelian, Varia Historia, 3.42 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

30. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.31.4, 2.20.4, 2.22.1, 9.30.9-9.30.11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.31.4. Such is the legend. Phlya and Myrrhinus have altars of Apollo Dionysodotus, Artemis Light-bearer, Dionysus Flower-god, the Ismenian nymphs and Earth, whom they name the Great goddess; a second temple contains altars of Demeter Anesidora (Sender-up of Gifts), Zeus Ctesius (God of Gain), Tithrone Athena, the Maid First-born and the goddesses styled August. The wooden image at Myrrhinus is of Colaenis. 2.20.4. The tomb near this they call that of the maenad Chorea, saying that she was one of the women who joined Dionysus in his expedition against Argos, and that Perseus, being victorious in the battle, put most of the women to the sword. To the rest they gave a common grave, but to Chorea they gave burial apart because of her high rank. 2.22.1. The temple of Hera Anthea (Flowery) is on the right of the sanctuary of Leto, and before it is a grave of women. They were killed in a battle against the Argives under Perseus, having come from the Aegean Islands to help Dionysus in war; for which reason they are surnamed Haliae (Women of the Sea). Facing the tomb of the women is a sanctuary of Demeter, surnamed Pelasgian from Pelasgus, son of Triopas, its founder, and not far from the sanctuary is the grave of Pelasgus. 9.30.9. In Larisa I heard another story, how that on Olympus is a city Libethra, where the mountain faces, Macedonia, not far from which city is the tomb of Orpheus. The Libethrians, it is said, received out of Thrace an oracle from Dionysus, stating that when the sun should see the bones of Orpheus, then the city of Libethra would be destroyed by a boar. The citizens paid little regard to the oracle, thinking that no other beast was big or mighty enough to take their city, while a boar was bold rather than powerful. 9.30.10. But when it seemed good to the god the following events befell the citizens. About midday a shepherd was asleep leaning against the grave of Orpheus, and even as he slept he began to sing poetry of Orpheus in a loud and sweet voice. Those who were pasturing or tilling nearest to him left their several tasks and gathered together to hear the shepherd sing in his sleep. And jostling one another and striving who could get nearest the shepherd they overturned the pillar, the urn fell from it and broke, and the sun saw whatever was left of the bones of Orpheus. 9.30.11. Immediately when night came the god sent heavy rain, and the river Sys (Boar), one of the torrents about Olympus, on this occasion threw down the walls of Libethra, overturning sanctuaries of gods and houses of men, and drowning the inhabitants and all the animals in the city. When Libethra was now a city of ruin, the Macedonians in Dium, according to my friend of Larisa, carried the bones of Orpheus to their own country.
31. Origen, Against Celsus, 4.17 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

4.17. But will not those narratives, especially when they are understood in their proper sense, appear far more worthy of respect than the story that Dionysus was deceived by the Titans, and expelled from the throne of Jupiter, and torn in pieces by them, and his remains being afterwards put together again, he returned as it were once more to life, and ascended to heaven? Or are the Greeks at liberty to refer such stories to the doctrine of the soul, and to interpret them figuratively, while the door of a consistent explanation, and one everywhere in accord and harmony with the writings of the Divine Spirit, who had His abode in pure souls, is closed against us? Celsus, then, is altogether ignorant of the purpose of our writings, and it is therefore upon his own acceptation of them that he casts discredit, and not upon their real meaning; whereas, if he had reflected on what is appropriate to a soul which is to enjoy an everlasting life, and on the opinion which we are to form of its essence and principles, he would not so have ridiculed the entrance of the immortal into a mortal body, which took place not according to the metempsychosis of Plato, but agreeably to another and higher view of things. And he would have observed one descent, distinguished by its great benevolence, undertaken to convert (as the Scripture mystically terms them) the lost sheep of the house of Israel, which had strayed down from the mountains, and to which the Shepherd is said in certain parables to have gone down, leaving on the mountains those which had not strayed.
32. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 21.155-21.160 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

33. Aeschylus, Edonians, 59

34. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 507



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 24
actaeon Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 39
aeschylus, aeschylean (dionysiac) tetralogies/plays Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 47
aeschylus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 49, 56
agaue Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 71, 90
alcohol, drunkenness Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 5
anatolia n de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 245
aphrodite Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 47
apollo, apollonian, apolline Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
apollo Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 36, 37, 66, 68, 69, 71, 74, 75, 76, 77, 84, 87; Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 198; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 43, 44, 47; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 245
archaic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
artemis/diana Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 68
artemis Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 47
bassaras, bassarides, bassarae Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
bassareus (dionysus) Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 84
bassarids Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 68, 69, 71, 74, 75, 76, 77, 84, 90, 91
bassaroi Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 84
butes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
cadmus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 44
cannibal, cannibalism Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 5, 77, 84, 90, 91
captivity/imprisonment/enslavement Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 56
cave Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 36
cerberus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 75
charon Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 75
charops Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 66
child Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 24, 77
chorus (male, female), in aeschylus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
chorus (male, female), of a. bassarae or bassarides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 43, 45, 46, 47, 49
concepts/values/beliefs Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 47
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63, 303
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 43, 44, 46, 47
cybele de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 245
delphi, delphian, delphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
delphi Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 87, 91
demeter Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 198
dionysism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
dionysos, dionysos baccheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
dionysos, dionysos xenos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
dionysos, epiphany Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
dionysos, punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63, 303
dionysus, as a bull/his bestial incarnation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 47, 49
dionysus, epiphanies/theophany of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 43
dionysus, illusion Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
dismemberment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
divine status Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 69
dramatic technique Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46, 56
dryas (lycurgus son)/ lycurgus children Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 91
ecstasy/ecstasis Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
eleusis Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 74
euripides, bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 45, 46, 49
euripides, hippolytus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 47
euripides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 47
eurydice Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 37, 75, 87
eurynome Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 24
evidence (of aeschylus dionysiac tetralogies), mythographic Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 43, 46
frenzy, mania, madness Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 5, 41, 84, 91
ge Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 87
gift Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 24
great dionysia, city dionysia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
hades, netherworld Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 37, 68, 69, 75, 76, 77, 87
hades place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
hallucination/delusion Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
helios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 245
henotheism, henotheistic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
hephaestus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 24
hera Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 24; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 56
heracles Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 24
hermes/ mercury Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 76
hippolytus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 71, 77
horse Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 36
hubris Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46, 49
imprisonment, captivity Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 36, 90
isis Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 198
kadmos, kadmeian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
kedalion Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 24
lebethrai Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 37, 71, 74
leibethra de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 339
lycurgus, in nonnus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 56
lycurgus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 45, 46, 47, 49, 56
macedonia de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 339
madness (mania)/frenzy, and lycurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 56
madness (mania)/frenzy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
maenads/maenadism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 43, 45, 49
messengers/messenger-speech Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 45
minyads, daughters of minyas psoloeis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
mountains Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 5, 75, 90
musaeus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 74
muses Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 36, 37, 71, 74; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 43, 44; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 339
mystery Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 47, 49
mystery cult Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 74
mystic, mystical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
naxos Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 24
night Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 87
oeneus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 68
olympus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 339
on stage Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 47, 49
oracle, oracular Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
oracle Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 87, 91
orpheus, as founder of mysteries and religious reformer Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 198
orpheus, death de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 339
orpheus, head de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 245
orpheus, tomb de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 339
orpheus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 5, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 66, 68, 69, 71, 74, 75, 76, 77, 84, 87, 90, 91; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63, 303; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 49, 56; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 339
orphic, see mystery cults de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 339
orphic de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 245
orphics Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
orphism, orphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
osiris Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 198
palace Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 71, 90
pangaeum Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 43, 45, 56
pangaeus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
pangaion Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 36, 37, 41, 74
pantheon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
parnassus, parnassian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
parodos Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
parody Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
pentheus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 39; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 44, 45, 46, 49
persephone Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 75
perseus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
pholos Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 24
polis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
procession Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
proetids, daughters of proetus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
punishment Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 40, 41, 66, 68, 69; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
pythagoreanism, pythagorean Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
reconciliation/convergence, of apollo and dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 43
reconciliation/convergence, of dionysus and lycurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 56
reconstruction, of bassarae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46, 47
refiguration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49
resemblances, aegyptii Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, agamemnon Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, amymone Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, bassarae/bassarides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 49, 56
resemblances, choephoroi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, danaides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, edonoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 49, 56
resemblances, eumenides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, laius Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, lycurgeia Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 56
resemblances, neaniskoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 43, 56
resemblances, oedipus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, oresteia Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 56
resemblances, proteus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, seven Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, sphinx Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resemblances, supplices Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46
resistence Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 39, 66, 90
rhea Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 198
rhesus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 44, 56
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63, 303
rock Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 76
scholia Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 43
sea Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 24, 66
shai al-quam Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 5
sophocles, antigone Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 56
sparagmos/dismemberment Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 43, 44, 45, 46, 56
sparagmos Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 41, 68
sun Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 37, 40, 66, 68, 69, 74, 75, 84, 87; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
syria Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 5
teiresias Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 39, 91
theater, theatrical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
thebes (in boeotia) Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 41
theomachist, theomachus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
theomachos (–oi)/theomachia/theomachein Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 46, 49
theophrastus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 84
theseus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 71
thespesius Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 87
thetis Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 24
thrace Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 39, 66, 77; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 43, 56
thracia, thracian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
tragedy, tragic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63, 303
vase-paintings Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 44
vine Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 91
woman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
worship' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
zagreus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63
zeus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
zopyrus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 63