Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5401
Epigraphy, Roesch, Ithesp, 174
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Tacitus, Annals, 1.8, 3.18 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.8.  The only business which he allowed to be discussed at the first meeting of the senate was the funeral of Augustus. The will, brought in by the Vestal Virgins, specified Tiberius and Livia as heirs, Livia to be adopted into the Julian family and the Augustan name. As legatees in the second degree he mentioned his grandchildren and great-grandchildren; in the third place, the prominent nobles — an ostentatious bid for the applause of posterity, as he detested most of them. His bequests were not above the ordinary civic scale, except that he left 43,500,000 sesterces to the nation and the populace, a thousand to every man in the praetorian guards, five hundred to each in the urban troops, and three hundred to all legionaries or members of the Roman cohorts. The question of the last honours was then debated. The two regarded as the most striking were due to Asinius Gallus and Lucius Arruntius — the former proposing that the funeral train should pass under a triumphal gateway; the latter, that the dead should be preceded by the titles of all laws which he had carried and the names of all peoples whom he had subdued. In addition, Valerius Messalla suggested that the oath of allegiance to Tiberius should be renewed annually. To a query from Tiberius, whether that expression of opinion came at his dictation, he retorted — it was the one form of flattery still left — that he had spoken of his own accord, and, when public interests were in question, he would (even at the risk of giving offence) use no man's judgment but his own. The senate clamoured for the body to be carried to the pyre on the shoulders of the Fathers. The Caesar, with haughty moderation, excused them from that duty, and warned the people by edict not to repeat the enthusiastic excesses which on a former day had marred the funeral of the deified Julius, by desiring Augustus to be cremated in the Forum rather than in the Field of Mars, his appointed resting-place. On the day of the ceremony, the troops were drawn up as though on guard, amid the jeers of those who had seen with their eyes, or whose fathers had declared to them, that day of still novel servitude and freedom disastrously re-wooed, when the killing of the dictator Caesar to some had seemed the worst, and to others the fairest, of high exploits:— "And now an aged prince, a veteran potentate, who had seen to it that not even his heirs should lack for means to coerce their country, must needs have military protection to ensure a peaceable burial! 3.18.  Much in these suggestions was mitigated by the emperor. He would not have Piso's name cancelled from the records, when the names of Mark Antony, who had levied war on his fatherland, and of Iullus Antonius, who had dishonoured the hearth of Augustus, still remained. He exempted Marcus Piso from official degradation, and granted him his patrimony: for, as I have often said, he was firm enough against pecuniary temptations, and in the present case his shame at the acquittal of Plancina made him exceptionally lenient. So, again, when Valerius Messalinus proposed to erect a golden statue in the temple of Mars the Avenger, and Caecina Severus an altar of Vengeance, he vetoed the scheme, remarking that these memorials were consecrated after victories abroad; domestic calamities called for sorrow and concealment. Messalinus had added that Tiberius, Augusta, Antonia, Agrippina, and Drusus ought to be officially thanked for their services in avenging Germanicus: Claudius he had neglected to mention. Indeed, it was only when Lucius Asprenas demanded point-blank in the senate if the omission was deliberate that the name was appended. For myself, the more I reflect on events recent or remote, the more am I haunted by the sense of a mockery in human affairs. For by repute, by expectancy, and by veneration, all men were sooner marked out for sovereignty than that future emperor whom destiny was holding in the background.
2. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9.31.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.31.3. On Helicon tripods have been dedicated, of which the oldest is the one which it is said Hesiod received for winning the prize for song at Chalcis on the Euripus. Men too live round about the grove, and here the Thespians celebrate a festival, and also games called the Museia. They celebrate other games in honor of Love, offering prizes not only for music but also for athletic events. Ascending about twenty stades from this grove is what is called the Horse's Fountain (Hippocrene). It was made, they say, by the horse of Bellerophon striking the ground with his hoof.
3. Epigraphy, Roesch, Ithesp, 177-178, 376-377, 172



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
advertisement Castelli and Sluiter, Agents of Change in the Greco-Roman and Early Modern Periods: Ten Case Studies in Agency in Innovation (2023) 76
agonothetes/agonothesia Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
apollo Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
ariston (agonothete) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
augustus Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
caesarea (festival at corinth) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
catchment area Castelli and Sluiter, Agents of Change in the Greco-Roman and Early Modern Periods: Ten Case Studies in Agency in Innovation (2023) 76
choregoi/choregia Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
comedy, new Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
comedy, old Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
competition, at festivals Castelli and Sluiter, Agents of Change in the Greco-Roman and Early Modern Periods: Ten Case Studies in Agency in Innovation (2023) 76
competition Castelli and Sluiter, Agents of Change in the Greco-Roman and Early Modern Periods: Ten Case Studies in Agency in Innovation (2023) 76
contests Castelli and Sluiter, Agents of Change in the Greco-Roman and Early Modern Periods: Ten Case Studies in Agency in Innovation (2023) 76
dionysia (festival)\n, at opous Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
epaminondas of acraephium Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
festivals, participants Castelli and Sluiter, Agents of Change in the Greco-Roman and Early Modern Periods: Ten Case Studies in Agency in Innovation (2023) 76
gnaeus calpurnius helix (priest) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
hesiod (poet) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
livia drusilla/julia augusta Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
marcus valerius messalla messalinus Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
mouseia (festival) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
priests/priestesses Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
ptoia (festival) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
satyrplay/satyr drama, at thespiae Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
satyrplay/satyr drama Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
statues Castelli and Sluiter, Agents of Change in the Greco-Roman and Early Modern Periods: Ten Case Studies in Agency in Innovation (2023) 74
technitai Castelli and Sluiter, Agents of Change in the Greco-Roman and Early Modern Periods: Ten Case Studies in Agency in Innovation (2023) 76
thespiae Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
tiberius (emperor) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
titus statilius taurus Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 122
traveling' Castelli and Sluiter, Agents of Change in the Greco-Roman and Early Modern Periods: Ten Case Studies in Agency in Innovation (2023) 76