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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4751
Epigraphy, Lsam, 44
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Martial, Epigrams, 10.51 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. Martial, Epigrams, 10.51 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 7.2, 9.36, 9.40 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.2. To Justus. How can you reconcile your statement that you are kept constantly busy by your never-ceasing engagements, with your request for something of mine to read, when, as a rule, it is all I can do to get people with plenty of leisure to waste time over my writings? I will therefore let the summer go by, when you are always busy and have no time to yourself, and as soon as winter comes - when I suppose you will at least have some leisure at nights - I will look among my trifles for something suitable to lay before you. In the meantime, I shall do well if my letters do not bore you, but, as that is inevitable, they shall be as brief as possible. Farewell. 9.36. To Fuscus. You ask me how I spend the day on my Tuscan villa in summer time. Well, I wake at my own sweet will, usually about the first hour, though it is often before, and rarely later. I keep my windows shut, for it is remarkable how, when all is still and in darkness, and I am withdrawn from distracting influences and am left to myself, and free to do what I like, my thoughts are not led by my eyes, but my eyes by my thoughts; and so my eyes, when they have nothing else to look at, only see the objects which are present before my mind. If I have anything on hand, I think it over, and weigh every word as carefully as though I were actually writing or revising, and in this way I get through more or less work, according as the subject is easy or difficult to compose and bear in mind. I call for a shorthand writer, and, after letting in the daylight, I dictate the passages which I have composed, then he leaves me, and I send for him again, and once again dismiss him. At the fourth or fifth hour, according as the weather tempts me - for I have no fixed and settled plan for the day - I betake myself to my terrace or covered portico, and there again I resume my thinking and dictating. I ride in my carriage, and still continue my mental occupation, just as when I am walking or lying down. My concentration of thought is unaffected, or rather is refreshed by the change. Then I snatch a brief sleep and again walk, and afterwards read aloud a Greek or Latin speech, as clearly and distinctly as I can, not so much to exercise the vocal organs as to help my digestion, though it does at the same time strengthen my voice. I take another walk, then I am anointed, and take exercise and a bath. While I am at dinner, if I am dining with my wife or a few friends, a book is read to us, and afterwards we hear a comic actor or a musician; then I walk with my attendants, some of whom are men of learning. Thus the evening is passed away with talk on all sorts of subjects, and even the longest day is soon done. Sometimes I vary this routine, for, if I have been lying down, or walking for any length of time, as soon as I have had my sleep and read aloud, I ride on horseback instead of in a carriage, as it takes less time, and one gets over the ground faster. My friends come in from the neighbouring towns to see me, and take up part of the day, and occasionally, when I am tired, I welcome their call as a pleasant relief. Sometimes I go hunting, but never without my tablets, so that though I may take no game, I still have something to bring back with me. Part of my time too is given to my tets - though in their opinion not enough - and their clownish complaints give me a fresh zest for my literary work and my round of engagements in town. Farewell. 9.40. To Fuscus. You say that you were very pleased to receive my letter * describing how I spend my leisure time in summer at my Tuscan villa, and you ask what changes I make in my routine in winter time at my Laurentine house. None at all, unless it be that I do without a sleep at midday and steal a good deal of the night, either before daybreak or after sunset, and if, as often happens in winter, I find I have some urgent business on hand, then I forego listening to a comic actor or music after dinner, and instead, I revise again and again what I have dictated, and at the same time improve my memory by making frequent corrections. So now you know my routine both in summer and winter, and to these you may add the spring and autumn, which come between the two other seasons. During these I take care to lose nothing of the days, and also nibble a little bit off the nights. Farewell. %%%
4. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 7.2, 9.36, 9.40 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.2. To Justus. How can you reconcile your statement that you are kept constantly busy by your never-ceasing engagements, with your request for something of mine to read, when, as a rule, it is all I can do to get people with plenty of leisure to waste time over my writings? I will therefore let the summer go by, when you are always busy and have no time to yourself, and as soon as winter comes - when I suppose you will at least have some leisure at nights - I will look among my trifles for something suitable to lay before you. In the meantime, I shall do well if my letters do not bore you, but, as that is inevitable, they shall be as brief as possible. Farewell. 9.36. To Fuscus. You ask me how I spend the day on my Tuscan villa in summer time. Well, I wake at my own sweet will, usually about the first hour, though it is often before, and rarely later. I keep my windows shut, for it is remarkable how, when all is still and in darkness, and I am withdrawn from distracting influences and am left to myself, and free to do what I like, my thoughts are not led by my eyes, but my eyes by my thoughts; and so my eyes, when they have nothing else to look at, only see the objects which are present before my mind. If I have anything on hand, I think it over, and weigh every word as carefully as though I were actually writing or revising, and in this way I get through more or less work, according as the subject is easy or difficult to compose and bear in mind. I call for a shorthand writer, and, after letting in the daylight, I dictate the passages which I have composed, then he leaves me, and I send for him again, and once again dismiss him. At the fourth or fifth hour, according as the weather tempts me - for I have no fixed and settled plan for the day - I betake myself to my terrace or covered portico, and there again I resume my thinking and dictating. I ride in my carriage, and still continue my mental occupation, just as when I am walking or lying down. My concentration of thought is unaffected, or rather is refreshed by the change. Then I snatch a brief sleep and again walk, and afterwards read aloud a Greek or Latin speech, as clearly and distinctly as I can, not so much to exercise the vocal organs as to help my digestion, though it does at the same time strengthen my voice. I take another walk, then I am anointed, and take exercise and a bath. While I am at dinner, if I am dining with my wife or a few friends, a book is read to us, and afterwards we hear a comic actor or a musician; then I walk with my attendants, some of whom are men of learning. Thus the evening is passed away with talk on all sorts of subjects, and even the longest day is soon done. Sometimes I vary this routine, for, if I have been lying down, or walking for any length of time, as soon as I have had my sleep and read aloud, I ride on horseback instead of in a carriage, as it takes less time, and one gets over the ground faster. My friends come in from the neighbouring towns to see me, and take up part of the day, and occasionally, when I am tired, I welcome their call as a pleasant relief. Sometimes I go hunting, but never without my tablets, so that though I may take no game, I still have something to bring back with me. Part of my time too is given to my tets - though in their opinion not enough - and their clownish complaints give me a fresh zest for my literary work and my round of engagements in town. Farewell. 9.40. To Fuscus. You say that you were very pleased to receive my letter * describing how I spend my leisure time in summer at my Tuscan villa, and you ask what changes I make in my routine in winter time at my Laurentine house. None at all, unless it be that I do without a sleep at midday and steal a good deal of the night, either before daybreak or after sunset, and if, as often happens in winter, I find I have some urgent business on hand, then I forego listening to a comic actor or music after dinner, and instead, I revise again and again what I have dictated, and at the same time improve my memory by making frequent corrections. So now you know my routine both in summer and winter, and to these you may add the spring and autumn, which come between the two other seasons. During these I take care to lose nothing of the days, and also nibble a little bit off the nights. Farewell. %%%
5. Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters, 1.1, 1.11, 2.2, 2.14 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

6. Epigraphy, Lsam, None

7. Epigraphy, Lscg, 151, 28, 48, 103

8. Epigraphy, Lss, 19

9. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 1237, 1232

10. Epigraphy, Seg, 29.1088, 40.956, 56.997



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
apollo, cults of, at didyma Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
artemis, pergaia (halicarnassus) Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 52
asclepius at pergamum Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 258
athena, cults of, nike (athens) Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 302
athens, sacred laws Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 170
corybantes Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 258
cos, informative documents from Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 52
cos, sales of priesthoods Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 52
cult agents, general index Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
decrees, sales of priesthoods and Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 52
didyma, sanctuary of apollo, oracular responses Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
didyma, sanctuary of apollo, sale of priesthoods at Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
eileithyia, sanctuary of (elis) Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
entrails Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 170, 171
epiprasis Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 258
exclusion from cult, of foreigners Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 193
extremities Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 171
gera Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 258
half-head Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 170
heads Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 170
herakleia Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
hip Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 170
hosios (and cognates), in context of rituals of worship Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 193
kidneys Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 170, 171
kos, sale of priesthoods at Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
kos Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
libation, banquet Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 320
metrodora, zakoros, orgeones of the motherin piraeus Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
miletos Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
miletus Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 170, 171
mother at minoa, priestess of (amorgos) Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
olympia Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
ore Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 171
orgeones of the mother, priestess of (piraeus) Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
osphys Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 171
pausanias, on priestess of eileithyia Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
pergamum Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 258
perks, in sacrifice Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 170, 171
piraeus, orgeones of the mother Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
piraeus Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
prasls Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 258
priestesses, familial and ficial status of Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
priestesses, tenure of Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
priesthoods, by allotment Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
priesthoods, by election Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
priesthoods, by purchase Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50, 302
priesthoods, hereditary Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 258
priests, perquisites of Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 258
priests, sacrificial prerogatives Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 52, 320
priests, salary Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 52
ritual norms Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 193
roman demos and roma, priesthood of Connelly, Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece (2007) 50
sacred laws Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 193
sacrifice, divine share in Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 320
sacrifice, prerogatives from priests Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 52, 320
sacrifice Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 320
sacrifices Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 258
sale of priesthoods Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 258
shoulder, maskhalismata Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 170
splanchna Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 320
splankhna Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 170
substitutes, one part substituted for another Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 171
table, cult Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 320
thesauros, construction of Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 52
thighbones Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 170
tongue' Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 171
victim (sacrificial), legs of Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 320
victim (sacrificial), thighs of Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 320
women, cult performers Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 52