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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5059
Epigraphy, Ig Vii, 2871
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Hecataeus of Miletus, Fragments, 2 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Polybius, Histories, 4.25.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

4.25.2.  The Boeotians accused the Aetolians of having plundered the temple of Athene Itonia in time of peace, the Phocians of having marched upon Ambrysus and Daulium and attempted to seize both cities
3. Strabo, Geography, 9.2.29 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9.2.29. Next Homer names Coroneia, Haliartus, Plataeae, and Glissas. Now Coroneia is situated on a height near Helicon. The Boeotians took possession of it on their return from the Thessalian Arne after the Trojan War, at which time they also occupied Orchomenus. And when they got the mastery of Coroneia, they built in the plain before the city the sanctuary of the Itonian Athena, bearing the same name as the Thessalian sanctuary; and they called the river which flowed past it Cuarius, giving it the same name as the Thessalian river. But Alcaeus calls it Coralius, when he says, Athena, warrior queen, who dost keep watch o'er the cornfields of Coroneia before thy temple on the banks of the Coralius River. Here, too, the Pamboeotian Festival used to be celebrated. And for some mystic reason, as they say, a statue of Hades was dedicated along with that of Athena. Now the people in Coroneia are called Coronii, whereas those in the Messenian Coroneia are called Coronaeis.
4. Plutarch, Agesilaus, 19.1-19.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 7.16.10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.16.10. A few years later the Romans took pity on Greece, restored the various old racial confederacies, with the right to acquire property in a foreign country, and remitted the fines imposed by Mummius. For he had ordered the Boeotians to pay a hundred talents to the people of Heracleia and Euboea, and the Achaeans to pay two hundred to the Lacedaemonians. Although the Romans granted the Greeks remission of these payments, yet down to my day a Roman governor has been sent to the country. The Romans call him the Governor, not of Greece, but of Achaia, because the cause of the subjection of Greece was the Achaeans, at that time at the head of the Greek nation. With Frazer's reading: “when the Romans subdued Greece, Achaia was at the head, etc.” This war came to an end when Antitheus was archon at Athens, in the hundred and sixtieth Olympiad 140 B.C., at which Diodorus of Sicyon was victorious. Pausanias seems to have made a mistake, as Corinth was taken in 146 B.C.
6. Polyaenus, Stratagems, 7.43 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Epigraphy, Ig I , 310

8. Epigraphy, Ig I , 310

9. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 33

10. Epigraphy, Ig Vii, 2712, 2727, 2729, 2858-2869, 3426, 2711

11. Epigraphy, Seg, 18.24

12. Various, Anthologia Palatina, 9.743



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agorakritos of paros Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 125
alkaios Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 362
apollo, ptoieus/ptoios Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 158
ares Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 125
athena itonia, and boiotian (warrior) identity Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 362
athena itonia, at athens and amorgos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 362
athena itonia, immigrant from thessaly Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 362
athena itonia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 362
athena itonia in boiotia, putative chthonic elements Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 125
athena itonia in boiotia, the pamboiotia Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 158, 163, 164, 165
contests, games, races Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 163, 164, 165
cult centres, local and regional Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 362
epaminondas of akraiphia Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 158
funerary, as war memorial Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 362
gaius (caligula) Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 158
identity, general, ethnic Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 362
immigrant Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 362
inscriptions Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 125, 163, 164, 165
insular, regional Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 362
koroneia, boiotian city Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 107
mamoura, modern boiotian village Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 163
metamorphosis chapel near mamoura Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 107
migrations, myths of, boiotia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 362
network, of myths and rituals (also myth-ritual web, grid, framework), and regional integration (kopais) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 362
onchestos, boiotian city Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 164
orchomenos, boiotian city Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 164
pamboiotia, festival Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 158, 163, 164, 165
performances of myth and ritual (also song), embracing social change Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 362
proxenia, proxenoi, in boiotia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 362
pyrrhus Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 362
region, as religious system Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 362
region, integration of in song' Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 362
thessalians Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 362
zeus, statue by agorakritos Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 125