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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5053
Epigraphy, Ig Iv ,1, 128
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Herodas, Mimes, 2.97 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

2. Strabo, Geography, 8.6.15 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.6.15. Epidaurus used to be called Epicarus, for Aristotle says that Carians took possession of it, as also of Hermione, but that after the return of the Heracleidae the Ionians who had accompanied the Heracleidae from the Attic Tetrapolis to Argos took up their abode with these Carians. Epidaurus, too, is an important city, and particularly because of the fame of Asclepius, who is believed to cure diseases of every kind and always has his sanctuary full of the sick, and also of the votive tablets on which the treatments are recorded, just as at Cos and Tricce. The city lies in the recess of the Saronic Gulf, has a circular coast of fifteen stadia, and faces the summer risings of the sun. It is enclosed by high mountains which reach as far as the sea, so that on all sides it is naturally fitted for a stronghold. Between Troezen and Epidaurus there was a stronghold called Methana, and also a peninsula of the same name. In some copies of Thucydides the name is spelled Methone, the same as the Macedonian city in which Philip, in the siege, had his eye knocked out. And it is on this account, in the opinion of Demetrius of Scepsis, that some writers, being deceived, suppose that it was the Methone in the territory of Troezen against which the men sent by Agamemnon to collect sailors are said to have uttered the imprecation that its citizens might never cease from their wall-building, since, in his opinion, it was not these citizens that refused, but those of the Macedonian city, as Theopompus says; and it is not likely, he adds, that these citizens who were near to Agamemnon disobeyed him.
3. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 42.11, 50.39-50.41, 51.18, 51.49-51.52 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Lucian, The Lover of Lies, 38 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9.39.11, 10.32.13, 10.33.11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.39.11. The descender lies with his back on the ground, holding barley-cakes kneaded with honey, thrusts his feet into the hole and himself follows, trying hard to get his knees into the hole. After his knees the rest of his body is at once swiftly drawn in, just as the largest and most rapid river will catch a man in its eddy and carry him under. After this those who have entered the shrine learn the future, not in one and the same way in all cases, but by sight sometimes and at other times by hearing. The return upwards is by the same mouth, the feet darting out first. 10.32.13. About forty stades distant from Asclepius is a precinct and shrine sacred to Isis, the holiest of all those made by the Greeks for the Egyptian goddess. For the Tithoreans think it wrong to dwell round about it, and no one may enter the shrine except those whom Isis herself has honored by inviting them in dreams. The same rule is observed in the cities above the Maeander by the gods of the lower world; for to all whom they wish to enter their shrines they send visions seen in dreams. 10.33.11. They celebrate orgies, well worth seeing, in honor of Dionysus, but there is no entrance to the shrine, nor have they any image that can be seen. The people of Amphicleia say that this god is their prophet and their helper in disease. The diseases of the Amphicleans themselves and of their neighbors are cured by means of dreams. The oracles of the god are given by the priest, who utters them when under the divine inspiration.
6. Origen, Against Celsus, 3.24 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3.24. And again, when it is said of Æsculapius that a great multitude both of Greeks and Barbarians acknowledge that they have frequently seen, and still see, no mere phantom, but Æsculapius himself, healing and doing good, and foretelling the future; Celsus requires us to believe this, and finds no fault with the believers in Jesus, when we express our belief in such stories, but when we give our assent to the disciples, and eye-witnesses of the miracles of Jesus, who clearly manifest the honesty of their convictions (because we see their guilelessness, as far as it is possible to see the conscience revealed in writing), we are called by him a set of silly individuals, although he cannot demonstrate that an incalculable number, as he asserts, of Greeks and Barbarians acknowledge the existence of Æsculapius; while we, if we deem this a matter of importance, can clearly show a countless multitude of Greeks and Barbarians who acknowledge the existence of Jesus. And some give evidence of their having received through this faith a marvellous power by the cures which they perform, revoking no other name over those who need their help than that of the God of all things, and of Jesus, along with a mention of His history. For by these means we too have seen many persons freed from grievous calamities, and from distractions of mind, and madness, and countless other ills, which could be cured neither by men nor devils.
7. Ammianus Marcellinus, History, 29.1.31 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

29.1.31. Then a man clad in linen garments, shod also in linen sandals and having a fillet wound about his head, carrying twigs from a tree of good omen, after propitiating in a set formula the divine power from whom predictions come, having full knowledge of the ceremonial, stood over the tripod as priest and set swinging a hanging ring fitted to a very fine linen Valesius read carbasio, which would correspond to the linen garments and sandals; the Thes. Ling. Lat. reads carpathio = linteo . thread and consecrated with mystic arts. This ring, passing over the designated intervals in a series of jumps, and falling upon this and that letter which detained it, made hexameters corresponding with the questions and completely finished in feet and rhythm, like the Pythian verses which we read, or those given out from the oracles of the Branchidae. The descendants of a certain Branchus, a favourite of Apollo, who were at first in charge of the oracle at Branchidae, later called oraculum Apollinis Didymei (Mela, i. 17, 86), in the Milesian territory; cf. Hdt. i. 1 57. The rings had magic powers, cf. Cic., De off. iii. 9, 38; Pliny, N. H. xxxiii. 8. Some writers give a different account of the method of divination used by the conspirators.
8. Libanius, Orations, 1.143, 1.243 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

9. Epigraphy, Epigr. Tou Oropou, 294

10. Epigraphy, Ig Iv ,1, 122-125, 127, 121

11. Epigraphy, Seg, 37.1019

12. Epigraphy, Stratonikeia, 512, 20

13. Epigraphy, Syll. , 1173



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aelius aristides, and libanius Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 708
aelius aristides, unsolicited dreams Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 202
aelius aristides Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 202
amphiaraos, therapeutic incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 290
amphiaraos, transformation into healer at oropos Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 203
amphikleia, temple of dionysos, use of term adyton Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 16
asclepius Bricault and Bonnet, Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire (2013) 176
asia minor Bricault and Bonnet, Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire (2013) 176
asklepieia, preliminary bloodless offerings and sacrifice Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175
asklepieia, ritual uses of olive Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 708
asklepieia, written evidence for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175, 202, 203
asklepieia and lesser cult sites, rhodes Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 16
asklepios, as oracular god Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 203
asklepios, as physician or surgeon in dreams Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175
asklepios, cults origin at trikka Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 202
asklepios, provides athletic tips in dreams Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175
asklepios, specific ailments cured, baldness Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175
asklepios, specific ailments cured, blindness/vision problem Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175
asklepios, specific ailments cured, embedded weapon fragments Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175
asklepios, specific ailments cured, gout Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175
asklepios, specific ailments cured, headaches Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175
asklepios, specific ailments cured, kidney stones Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175
asklepios, specific ailments cured, leeches Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175
asklepios, specific ailments cured, paralysis/lameness Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175
asklepios, specific ailments cured, parasitic worm Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175
asklepios, specific ailments cured, unhealed sores/infections Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175
asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175, 202, 203; Stavrianopoulou, Shifting Social Imaginaries in the Hellenistic Period: Narrations, Practices and Images (2013) 148
coinage Bricault and Bonnet, Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire (2013) 176
cult personnel (greek), neokoros/nakoros Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 290
dedicatory formulas (greek and latin), προστάξαντος τοῦ θεοῦ Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 290
dedicatory objects, anatomical (general) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 290
dedicatory objects, sold in temple commercial zones Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 16
devotion Bricault and Bonnet, Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire (2013) 176
divinities (greek and roman), apollo maleatas Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175, 202
divinities (greek and roman), athena Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 202
dreams (general), prescriptive dreams and medical knowledge Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 203
dreams (in greek and latin literature), aelius aristides, sacred tales Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 202
emotion Bricault and Bonnet, Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire (2013) 176
enargeia Bricault and Bonnet, Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire (2013) 176
ephesus Bricault and Bonnet, Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire (2013) 176
epidauros, peloponnese Stavrianopoulou, Shifting Social Imaginaries in the Hellenistic Period: Narrations, Practices and Images (2013) 148
epidauros asklepieion, isyllos hymn Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 16, 175, 202, 203, 290, 708
epidauros asklepieion, literary sources for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 202, 203
epidauros asklepieion, tholos Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 203
epidauros asklepieion, visit of marcus julius apellas (carian citizen) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 708
epidauros asklepieion, written sources for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175
epidauros asklepieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175
epidauros miracle inscriptions, overview of ailments reported cured Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175
epidauros miracle inscriptions, reference to apollo maleatas Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175
epidauros miracle inscriptions, surgery performed by asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175
epidauros miracle inscriptions, testimony about asklepios teaching wrestling move Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175
epidauros miracle inscriptions, testimony about broken cup being fixed Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175
hippocrates, association with kos asklepieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 203
incubation, terms for incubation structures (greek) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 16
individual Bricault and Bonnet, Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire (2013) 176
kos asklepieion, associated with asklepiads and medical school Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 203
kos asklepieion, associated with hippocrates and hippocratic school Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 203
kos asklepieion, inscribed records of cures Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 202, 203
kos asklepieion, leges sacrae possibly pertaining to incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 16
kos asklepieion, literary evidence for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 203
kos asklepieion, offshoot of trikka asklepieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 203
kos asklepieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 202, 203
kosmas and damian (saints), at trikka Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 202
lebena asklepieion, dedications of publius granius rufus Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 708
lebena asklepieion, epigraphical sources for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 16
libanius, and aelius aristides Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 708
libanius, and asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 708
libanius, and hygieia Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 708
libanius, and physicians Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 708
libanius, brothers visit to aegae asklepieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 708
libanius, chronic headaches Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 708
libanius, drug prescribed by asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 708
libanius, eudaemon (rhetor), visit to aegae asklepieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 708
libanius, omission of medical details Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 708
libanius, receives shoot from aegae asklepieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 708
libanius, use of allusive language forillness Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 708
monotheism Bricault and Bonnet, Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire (2013) 176
oracles (greek), lydia, oracles of underworld gods Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 16
oropos amphiareion, anatomical dedications Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 290
oropos amphiareion, dedicatory formulas and incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 290
oropos amphiareion, epigraphical evidence for healing Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 290
oropos amphiareion, presence of neokoroi Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 290
oropos amphiareion, sacred spring (spring of amphiaraos) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 290
oropos amphiareion, uses of water Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 290
oropos amphiareion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 16, 290
pergamon Bricault and Bonnet, Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire (2013) 176
pergamon asklepieion, literary sources for incubation (excluding aristides) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 203
podalirios, and asklepiads Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 203
religion (greek), ritual use of branches Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 708
rhodes asklepieion or sarapieion lex sacra for purity Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 16
soteriology Bricault and Bonnet, Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire (2013) 176
stratonikeia' Bricault and Bonnet, Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire (2013) 176
trikka asklepieion, apollo maleatas cult Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 175, 202
trikka asklepieion, isyllos hymn evidence of incubation(?) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 16, 202, 203
trikka asklepieion, linked to kos asklepieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 203
trikka asklepieion, literary evidence for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 202, 203
trikka asklepieion, original asklepios sanctuary Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 202
trikka asklepieion, problem of sanctuarys location Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 202
trikka asklepieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 202, 203
trophonios (and trophonion) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 16, 203
valens, treason trial for divination Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 708