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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11592
Epigraphy, Ig Ii3, 882
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 1.54 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.54. When the divine answers had been brought back and Croesus learned of them, he was very pleased with the oracles. So, altogether expecting that he would destroy the kingdom of Cyrus, he sent once again to Pytho and endowed the Delphians, whose number he had learned, with two gold staters apiece. ,The Delphians, in return, gave Croesus and all Lydians the right of first consulting the oracle, exemption from all charges, the chief seats at festivals, and perpetual right of Delphian citizenship to whoever should wish it.
2. Isocrates, Orations, 16.35, 18.61 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

472a. for getting at the truth; since occasionally a man may actually be crushed by the number and reputation of the false witnesses brought against him. And so now you will find almost everybody, Athenians and foreigners, in agreement with you on the points you state, if you like to bring forward witnesses against the truth of what I say: if you like, there is Nicias, son of Niceratus, with his brothers, whose tripods are standing in a row in the Dionysium; or else Aristocrates, son of Scellias, whose goodly offering again is well known at Delphi ;
4. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 6.16.1-6.16.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6.16.1. ‘Athenians, I have a better right to command than others—I must begin with this as Nicias has attacked me—and at the same time I believe myself to be worthy of it. The things for which I am abused, bring fame to my ancestors and to myself, and to the country profit besides. 6.16.2. The Hellenes, after expecting to see our city ruined by the war, concluded it to be even greater than it really is, by reason of the magnificence with which I represented it at the Olympic games, when I sent into the lists seven chariots, a number never before entered by any private person, and won the first prize, and was second and fourth, and took care to have everything else in a style worthy of my victory. Custom regards such displays as honourable, and they cannot be made without leaving behind them an impression of power. 6.16.3. Again, any splendour that I may have exhibited at home in providing choruses or otherwise, is naturally envied by my fellow-citizens, but in the eyes of foreigners has an air of strength as in the other instance. And this is no useless folly, when a man at his own private cost benefits not himself only, but his city:
5. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 27.3-27.4 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 15.53.4, 19.78.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

15.53.4.  But Epameinondas, who saw that the soldiers were superstitious on account of the omens that had occurred, earnestly desired through his own ingenuity and strategy to reverse the scruples of the soldiery. Accordingly, a number of men having recently arrived from Thebes, he persuaded them to say that the arms on the temple of Heracles had surprisingly disappeared and that word had gone abroad in Thebes that the heroes of old had taken them up and set off to help the Boeotians. He placed before them another man as one who had recently ascended from the cave of Trophonius, who said that the god had directed them, when they won at Leuctra, to institute a contest with crowns for prizes in honour of Zeus the king. This indeed is the origin of this festival which the Boeotians now celebrate at Lebadeia. 19.78.4.  At first the Athenians kept sending secretly to Antigonus, begging him to free the city; but then, taking courage when Ptolemaeus drew near the city, they forced Demetrius to make a truce and to send envoys to Antigonus about an alliance.
7. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 16.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16.3. And indeed, his voluntary contributions of money, his support of public exhibitions, his unsurpassed munificence towards the city, the glory of his ancestry, the power of his eloquence, the comeliness and vigor of his person, together with his experience and prowess in war, made the Athenians lenient and tolerant towards everything else; they were forever giving the mildest of names to his transgressions, calling them the product of youthful spirits and ambition.
8. Plutarch, Cimon, 10.3-10.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Plutarch, Nicias, 4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Plutarch, Pericles, 14 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Plutarch, Solon, 23.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

23.3. In the valuations of sacrificial offerings, at any rate, a sheep and a bushel of grain are reckoned at a drachma; the victor in the Isthmian games was to be paid a hundred drachmas, and the Olympic victor five hundred; the man who brought in a wolf, was given five drachmas, and for a wolf’s whelp, one; the former sum, according to Demetrius the Phalerian, was the price of an ox, the latter that of a sheep. For although the prices which Solon fixes in his sixteenth table are for choice victims, and naturally many times as great as those for ordinary ones, still, even these are low in comparison with present prices.
12. Epigraphy, Ig I , 49

13. Epigraphy, Ig I , 49

14. Epigraphy, Syll. , 4



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alcibiades Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
alexander iii Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 150
amphiaraia, great Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 151
amphiaraia, overhauls of Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 151
amphiaraos, historical resonances of Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 151
amphiaraos, military associations of Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 151
amphiareion, at rhamnous Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 151
amphidemos son of amphimedes of oropos Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 150
apollo Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 917
athens, athenians, and the amphiareion Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 150
athletes, honored in archaic poleis Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
benefactors, citizens as Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
boiotian koinon, and oropos Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 150, 151
chaironeia, aftermath of battle (338) Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 150, 151
cimon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
corcyra Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 60
delos, theoria Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 917
deme, assembly Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 917
demos, and gifts in fifth-century athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
demos, in corcyra Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 60
ecclesia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 60
eleusis Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 151
elis, eleans Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 60
epilektoi Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 889
euergetism, origins of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 112
euergetês, euergetai, in the archaic polis Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
funerary monuments Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 60
gift-exchange, non-institutional/informal Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
gifts, and dependence Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
gifts, and power Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
gifts, and solidarity Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 112
gorgus of sparta Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 60
herakleidai Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 917
honorific inscriptions, in the sixth century bc Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 60
independence, and epigraphical publication Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 150
kassandros Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 150
lease, deme Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 917
lebadeia, basileia Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 151
liturgies, in fifth-century athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
locris Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 60
macedonians, and interstate relations Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 150, 151
macedonians, oropian honours for Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 150
menecrates of oianthea Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 60
military commanders, honors for Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
nicias Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
olympia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 60
oropos, and athens Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 150, 151
panathenaia Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 151
peloponnesian war Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
pericles Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
perioikoi Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 60
phylarch Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 917
plutarch Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
proxenia, proxenoi, and the origins of euergetism Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 112
proxenia, proxenoi, and xenia (ritualized friendship) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 112
proxenia, proxenoi, title Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 60
proxenos, proxenoi, of oropos Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 150, 151
proxeny decrees, decrees of proxenia, and external interaction Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 150, 151
proxeny decrees, decrees of proxenia, contexts of Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 150, 151
proxeny decrees, decrees of proxenia, earliest decrees at the amphiareion Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 150
ptolemaios i Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 150
public buildings, and pericles building program Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
rich, the, in fourth-century athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
sparta, spartans Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 60
springhouse decree (athens) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
syangela Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 150
taxiarch' Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 917
thebes, and the boiotian koinon Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 151
victors, honours for Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 151
xenia (ritualized friendship) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 112