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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5048
Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 1


nanRelief Kephisophon of Paiania was secretary (403/2). For the Samians who joined with the Athenian People. Decree 1A (Council and People, 405/4) (5) The Council and the People decided. KekropisVII was in prytany. Polymnis of Euonymon was secretary. Alexias was archon (405/4). Nikophon of Athmonon was chairman. Proposal (gnōmē) of Kleisophos and his fellow prutaneis: to praise the Samian envoys (presbesi), both those who came previously and those who have come now, and their Council and their generals and the other Samians, because they are good men and eager to do what good they can, (10) and the actions which they have performed are judged to have been performed rightly for the Athenians and the Samians; and in return for the good which they have done for the Athenians, and because they now attach importance to the Athenians and propose good things for them, the Council and the People shall decide: that the Samians shall be Athenians living under whatever constitution they wish; and, so that this shall be as advantageous as possible for both parties, as they themselves suggest, when peace has been made, then (15) to deliberate jointly about the other matters. They shall use their own laws, being autonomous, and in other respects act in accordance with the oaths and the agreements as agreed by the Athenians and Samians. Concerning any complaints which the two parties may have against each other, they shall give and receive justice in accordance with the existing convention (sumbolas). If any emergency arises about the constitution because of the war and before the peace, (20) as the envoys themselves suggest, the Samians shall deliberate in the light of the circumstances and do what they judge best. Concerning the peace, if it is made, the same terms as for the Athenians shall apply also to those now living in Samos; if it is necessary to make war, they shall prepare as best they can, acting together with the Athenian generals; if the Athenians send an embassy anywhere, those present from Samos shall send jointly (25) if they wish to send anybody, and shall give what good advice they can. The triremes which are at Samos shall be given to the Samians to use, after they have repaired them, in accordance with their own judgement; the names of the trierarchs to whom the ships were assigned the envoys (presbes) shall record for the secretary of the Council and the generals; and, if for any of these anything is inscribed anywhere in the public domain (dēmosiōi) from when they took over the triremes, (30) all of this everywhere the dockyard officials (neōroi) shall delete, but shall exact the equipment for the state (dēmosiōi) as soon as possible, and those who have any of it shall be compelled to give it back (32) intact. Decree 1B (People, 405/4) (32) Proposal (gnōmē) of Kleisophos and his fellow prutaneis: in other respects in accordance with the Council, but the grant shall be valid for those who have come, as they themselves ask, and they shall be distributed immediately by the archons among the tribes (phulas) in ten groups (dekacha). Travelling expenses shall (35) be provided for the envoys (presbesi) by the generals as soon as possible; and to praise Eumachos and all the other Samians who have come with Eumachos, because they are good men with regard to the Athenians; and to invite Eumachos to dinner in the city hall (prutaneon) tomorrow. The secretary of the Council together with the generals shall inscribe what has been decreed on a stone stele and set it down on the acropolis; and the Greek treasurers (hellēnotamias) (40) shall provide the money; it shall be inscribed at Samos in the same way at their own expense. Decree 2A (Council and People, 403/2) The Council and the People decided. PandionisIII was in prytany. Agyrrhios of Kollytos was secretary. Eukleides was archon (403/2). Kallias of Oa was chairman. Kephisophon proposed: to praise the Samians because they are good men with regard to the Athenians; and everything shall be valid which previously the People of Athens voted for the People of Samos. (45) The Samians, as they themselves require (keleuosin), shall send to Sparta whoever they themselves wish; and since in addition they ask the Athenians to collaborate (sunpratten), the Athenians shall choose additional ambassadors (presbes), and these shall collaborate with the Samians to achieve whatever benefit they can, [and shall deliberate jointly with] them. The Athenians praise the Ephesians and the Notians because they enthusiastically received those of the Samians who were outside. To bring the Samian embassy (presbeian) (50) before the People and place them on the agenda, if they need anything. And to invite the Samian (51) embassy (presbeian) to dinner in the city hall (prutaneion) tomorrow. Decree 2B (People, 403/2) (51) Kephisophon proposed: in other respects in accordance with the Council; but the Athenian People shall vote that there shall be valid what was voted previously about the Samians, as the Council, having formulated a proposal (proboleusasa), brought it forward to the People. To invite the embassy (presbeian) of the Samians (55) to dinner (deipnon) in the city hall (prutaneon) tomorrow. Decree 3 (Council and People, 403/2) The Council and the People decided. ErechtheisI was in prytany. Kephisophon of Paiania was secretary. Eukleides was archon (403/2). Python of Kedoi was chairman. Eu- proposed: to praise Poses the Samian because he is a good man with regard to the Athenians, and, in return for the good that he has done to the People, the People shall give him a gift (dōreian) of five hundred drachmas (60) [for making a crown]; let the treasurers give the money. Bring him before the People, to find from the People whatever benefit he can. The book (biblion) [of the decree] the secretary of the Council shall [hand over] to him immediately. To invite the Samians who have come to hospitality (xenia) in the city hall (prutaneon) tomorrow. - proposed: in other respects in accordance with the Council; but to praise Poses the (65) Samian and his sons, because they are good men with regard to the People of Athens; and the things voted previously by the Athenian People shall be valid; and let the secretary of the Council inscribe the decree on a stone stele, and let the treasurers provide the money for the stele. The People shall give Poses a gift (dōrean) of a thousand drachmas for his goodness towards the Athenians, and from the thousand drachmas he shall make a crown, (70) and engrave on it that the People crown him for being a good man and for his goodness to the Athenians. Also praise the Samians because they are good men with regard to the Athenians. If they need anything from the People, the prytany shall bring them forward to the People always first after the sacred business. The prytany shall also bring the sons of Poses forward before the People at the first session. Invite also to hospitality (xenia) (75) in the city hall (prutaneon) Poses and his sons and those of the Samians who are present. text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG II2 1 - Honours for the Samians, 405/4 and 403/2 BC


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 1.147 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.147. And as kings, some of them chose Lycian descendants of Glaucus son of Hippolochus, and some Caucones of Pylus, descendants of Codrus son of Melanthus, and some both. Yet since they set more store by the name than the rest of the Ionians, let it be granted that those of pure birth are Ionians; ,and all are Ionians who are of Athenian descent and keep the feast dateApaturia /date. All do keep it, except the men of Ephesus and Colophon ; these are the only Ionians who do not keep it, and these because, they say, of a certain pretext of murder.
2. Isaeus, Orations, 20, 19 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Xenophon, Hellenica, 2.4.20, 6.3.2-6.3.5, 6.4.19 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.4.20. And Cleocritus, the herald of the initiated, i.e. in the Eleusinian mysteries. a man with a very fine voice, obtained silence and said: Fellow citizens, why do you drive us out of the city? why do you wish to kill us? For we never did you any harm, but we have shared with you in the most solemn rites and sacrifices and the most splendid festivals, we have been companions in the dance and schoolmates and comrades in arms, and we have braved many dangers with you both by land and by sea in defense of the 404 B.C. common safety and freedom of us both. 6.3.3. Callistratus, the popular orator, also went with the embassy; for he had promised Iphicrates that if he would let him go home, he would either send money for the fleet or bring about peace, and consequently he had been at Athens and engaged in efforts to secure peace; and when the ambassadors came before the assembly of the Lacedaemonians and the representatives of their allies, the first of them who spoke was Callias, the torch-bearer. of the Eleusinian mysteries.cp. II. iv. 20. He was the sort of man to enjoy no less being praised by himself than by others, and on this occasion he began in about the following words: 6.3.4. Men of Lacedaemon, as regards the position I hold as your diplomatic agent, I am not the only member of our family who has held it, but my father’s father received it from his father and handed 371 B.C. it on to his descendants; and I also wish to make clear to you how highly esteemed we have been by our own state. For whenever there is war she chooses us as generals, and whenever she becomes desirous of tranquillity she sends us out as peacemakers. I, for example, have twice before now come here to treat for a termination of war, and on both these embassies I succeeded in achieving peace both for you and for ourselves; now for a third time I am come, and it is now, I believe, that with greater justice than ever before I should obtain a reconciliation between us. 6.3.5. For I see that you do not think one way and we another, but that you as well as we are distressed over the destruction of Plataea and Thespiae. How, then, is it not fitting that men who hold the same views should be friends of one another rather than enemies? Again, it is certainly the part of wise men not to undertake war even if they should have differences, if they be slight; but if, in fact, we should actually find ourselves in complete agreement, should we not be astounding fools not to make peace? 6.4.19. And Archidamus accordingly offered his sacrifices at the frontier. As for the Thebans, immediately after the battle they sent to Athens a garlanded messenger, and while telling of the greatness of their victory, they at the same time urged the Athenians to come to their aid, saying that now it was possible to take vengeance upon the Lacedaemonians for all the harm they had done to them.
4. Demosthenes, Orations, 50.13, 59.14-59.15 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 10.7 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10.7. further, that Epicurus's acquaintance with philosophy was small and his acquaintance with life even smaller; that his bodily health was pitiful, so much so that for many years he was unable to rise from his chair; and that he spent a whole mina daily on his table, as he himself says in his letter to Leontion and in that to the philosophers at Mitylene. Also that among other courtesans who consorted with him and Metrodorus were Mammarion and Hedia and Erotion and Nikidion. He alleges too that in his thirty-seven books On Nature Epicurus uses much repetition and writes largely in sheer opposition to others, especially to Nausiphanes, and here are his own words: Nay, let them go hang: for, when labouring with an idea, he too had the sophist's off-hand boastfulness like many another servile soul;
6. Andocides, Orations, 1.45

7. Andocides, Orations, 1.45

8. Epigraphy, Ig I , 127, 101

9. Epigraphy, Ig I , 127, 101

10. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 116, 13, 34, 40-42, 70, 107

11. Epigraphy, Ig Ii3, 336, 298



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
altar Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 28
ambassadors Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 237
antissa Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 239
apollodoros Kapparis, Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens (2021) 213
apollodorus, trierarch in Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 237
archeneüs, money-lender Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 237
aristopithes, athenian ambassador to lesbos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 239
ash Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 28
athena (goddess), depiction on coins Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 264
athens, tribes and kinship groups Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 264
autolycus, athenian ambassador to lesbos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 239
bosphorus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 239
braurom Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 28
brazier Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 28
chaniotis, angelos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 264
citizen/citizenship Kapparis, Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens (2021) 213
coins Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 264
cole, susan g. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 264
communal religion Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 264
cooking pots Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 28
council, pre-kleisthenic, quota Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 824
cultural memory, social cohesion and identity Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 264
cultural memory, tribes and kinship groups Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 264
cultural memory Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 264
deipnon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 237, 239
delos Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 28
delphi, naopoioi and other officials Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 824
delphi, oracle Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 264
demosthenes, politics Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 824
dining Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 28
eresus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 239
eumaios Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 28
festivals, apatouria Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 264
generation Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 824
grill Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 28
hearth Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 28
hermokopidai Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 824
herodotos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 264
horos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 824
incense-burner Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 28
inventory Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 28
kron, uta Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 264
lesbos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 239
leucon, king of bosphorus, leuctra, battle of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 239
loutrophoros Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 824
mantis Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 824
market Kapparis, Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens (2021) 213
meat, grilled Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 28
meat-hook Ekroth, The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period (2013) 28
metaneira, therapy Kapparis, Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens (2021) 213
methymna Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 239
metic Kapparis, Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens (2021) 213
mining Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 824
money, distribution of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 237
mytilene Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 239
neaira Kapparis, Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens (2021) 213
oracles, delphi Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 264
pasturage Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 824
phokion Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 824
politics Kapparis, Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens (2021) 213
proedroi Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 239
prostates Kapparis, Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens (2021) 213
proxenia, proxenoi, and xenia (hospitality meal) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 237
prytaneion Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 239
prytaneion decree Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 237
public praise Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 239
pyrrha Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 239
sacrifice (thysia)' Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 264
samos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 264
sculptor/sculpture Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 824
thebes Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 239
thessaly Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 239
thrasylochus, money-lender Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 237
timonothus, athenian ambassador to lesbos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 239
trierarch Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 824
xenia (hospitality meal) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 237, 239
xenophon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 239