Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5045
Epigraphy, Ig I , 131
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

24 results
1. Pindar, Paeanes, 7 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Aristophanes, Knights, 1226-1254, 280-283, 573-580, 702, 1225 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1225. ἐγὼ δέ τυ ἐστεφάνιξα κἀδωρησάμαν.
3. Herodotus, Histories, 5.55, 7.153 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5.55. When he was forced to leave Sparta, Aristagoras went to Athens, which had been freed from its ruling tyrants in the manner that I will show. First Hipparchus, son of Pisistratus and brother of the tyrant Hippias, had been slain by Aristogiton and Harmodius, men of Gephyraean descent. This was in fact an evil of which he had received a premonition in a dream. After this the Athenians were subject for four years to a tyranny not less but even more absolute than before. 7.153. Such is the end of the story of the Argives. As for Sicily, envoys were sent there by the allies to hold converse with Gelon, Syagrus from Lacedaemon among them. The ancestor of this Gelon, who settled at Gela, was from the island of Telos which lies off Triopium. When the founding of Gela by Antiphemus and the Lindians of Rhodes was happening, he would not be left behind. ,His descendants in time became and continue to be priests of the goddesses of the underworld; this office had been won, as I will show, by Telines, one of their forefathers. There were certain Geloans who had been worsted in party strife and had been banished to the town of Mactorium, inland of Gela. ,These men Telines brought to Gela with no force of men but only the holy instruments of the goddesses worship to aid him. From where he got these, and whether or not they were his own invention, I cannot say; however that may be, it was in reliance upon them that he restored the exiles, on the condition that his descendants should be ministering priests of the goddesses. ,Now it makes me marvel that Telines should have achieved such a feat, for I have always supposed that such feats cannot be performed by any man but only by such as have a stout heart and manly strength. Telines, however, is reported by the dwellers in Sicily to have had a soft and effeminate disposition.
4. Isaeus, Orations, 5.47 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Isocrates, Orations, 9.57, 15.94, 18.61, 18.65 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

36d. Some good thing, men of Athens, if I must propose something truly in accordance with my deserts; and the good thing should be such as is fitting for me. Now what is fitting for a poor man who is your benefactor, and who needs leisure to exhort you? There is nothing, men of Athens, so fitting as that such a man be given his meals in the prytaneum. That is much more appropriate for me than for any of you who has won a race at the Olympic games with a pair of horses or a four-in-hand. For he makes you seem to be happy, whereas I make you happy in reality;
7. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 4.27-4.29, 4.37-4.40, 6.56 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Xenophon, Hellenica, 1.33, 2.4.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.4.2. Presently Thrasybulus set out from Thebes with about seventy companions and seized Phyle, a strong fortress. And the Thirty marched out from the city against him with the Three Thousand and the cavalry, the weather being very fine indeed. When they reached Phyle, some of the young men were so bold as to attack the fortress at once, but they accomplished nothing and suffered some wounds themselves before they retired.
9. Aeschines, Letters, 3.143, 3.178-3.179, 3.187-3.190, 3.243 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 57-58, 56 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Demosthenes, Orations, 20.70, 20.75, 20.79, 20.86, 20.127-20.130, 20.146, 20.159, 21.62, 22.72, 23.130, 23.136, 24.180, 43.51, 50.13, 59.59 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

12. Dinarchus, Or., 1.101 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

13. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 15.33.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

15.33.4.  After this Agesilaüs returned with his army to the Peloponnese, while the Thebans, saved by the generalship of Chabrias, though he had performed many gallant deeds in war, was particularly proud of this bit of strategy and he caused the statues which had been granted to him by his people to be erected to display that posture.
14. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 34.17 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 33.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

33.2. At this time, In the early summer of 408 B.C. therefore, the people had only to meet in assembly, and Alcibiades addressed them. He lamented and bewailed his own lot, but had only little and moderate blame to lay upon the people. The entire mischief he ascribed to a certain evil fortune and envious genius of his own. Then he descanted at great length upon the vain hopes which their enemies were cherishing, and wrought his hearers up to courage. At last they crowned him with crowns of gold, and elected him general with sole powers by land and sea.
16. Plutarch, Solon, 23 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.3.2, 1.23.9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.3.2. Near the portico stand Conon, Timotheus his son and Evagoras Evagoras was a king of Salamis in Cyprus, who reigned from about 410 to 374 B.C. He favoured the Athenians, and helped Conon to defeat the Spartan fleet off Cnidus in 394 B.C. King of Cyprus, who caused the Phoenician men-of-war to be given to Conon by King Artaxerxes. This he did as an Athenian whose ancestry connected him with Salamis, for he traced his pedigree back to Teucer and the daughter of Cinyras. Here stands Zeus, called Zeus of Freedom, and the Emperor Hadrian, a benefactor to all his subjects and especially to the city of the Athenians. 1.23.9. of the statues that stand after the horse, the likeness of Epicharinus who practised the race in armour was made by Critius, while Oenobius performed a kind service for Thucydides the son of Olorus. The great historian of the Peloponnesian war. He succeeded in getting a decree passed for the return of Thucydides to Athens, who was treacherously murdered as he was returning, and there is a monument to him not far from the Melitid gate.
18. Aeschines, Or., 3.143, 3.178-3.179, 3.187-3.190, 3.243

19. Andocides, Orations, 1.45, 1.117-1.127, 2.11-2.12, 2.17-2.18

20. Andocides, Orations, 1.45, 1.117-1.127, 2.11-2.12, 2.17-2.18

21. Epigraphy, Ig I , 131

22. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 70, 40

23. Epigraphy, Seg, 28.45

24. Lycurgus, Orations, 1.117



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agones, of epitaphia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 119
demes Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 119
ephebes Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 119
epimeletai, of koina Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 119
gene Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 119
grammateis Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 119
koina Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 119
oaths Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 119
sacrifice Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 119
salaminioi Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 119
sanctuaries, restrictions concerning' Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 119