Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4927
Epigraphy, Epigr. Tou Oropou, 277
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

23 results
1. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 626 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

626. καὶ τἄλλ' ὅς' ἐστὶν ἔνδον ηὐτρεπισμένα. Χοροῦ
2. Herodotus, Histories, 1.46-1.52, 8.134 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.46. After the loss of his son, Croesus remained in deep sorrow for two years. After this time, the destruction by Cyrus son of Cambyses of the sovereignty of Astyages son of Cyaxares, and the growth of the power of the Persians, distracted Croesus from his mourning; and he determined, if he could, to forestall the increase of the Persian power before they became great. ,Having thus determined, he at once made inquiries of the Greek and Libyan oracles, sending messengers separately to Delphi, to Abae in Phocia, and to Dodona, while others were despatched to Amphiaraus and Trophonius, and others to Branchidae in the Milesian country. ,These are the Greek oracles to which Croesus sent for divination: and he told others to go inquire of Ammon in Libya . His intent in sending was to test the knowledge of the oracles, so that, if they were found to know the truth, he might send again and ask if he should undertake an expedition against the Persians. 1.47. And when he sent to test these shrines he gave the Lydians these instructions: they were to keep track of the time from the day they left Sardis, and on the hundredth day inquire of the oracles what Croesus, king of Lydia, son of Alyattes, was doing then; then they were to write down whatever the oracles answered and bring the reports back to him. ,Now none relate what answer was given by the rest of the oracles. But at Delphi, no sooner had the Lydians entered the hall to inquire of the god and asked the question with which they were entrusted, than the Pythian priestess uttered the following hexameter verses: , quote type="oracle" l met="dact"“I know the number of the grains of sand and the extent of the sea, /l lAnd understand the mute and hear the voiceless. /l lThe smell has come to my senses of a strong-shelled tortoise /l lBoiling in a cauldron together with a lamb's flesh, /l lUnder which is bronze and over which is bronze.” /l /quote 1.48. Having written down this inspired utterance of the Pythian priestess, the Lydians went back to Sardis . When the others as well who had been sent to various places came bringing their oracles, Croesus then unfolded and examined all the writings. Some of them in no way satisfied him. But when he read the Delphian message, he acknowledged it with worship and welcome, considering Delphi as the only true place of divination, because it had discovered what he himself had done. ,For after sending his envoys to the oracles, he had thought up something which no conjecture could discover, and carried it out on the appointed day: namely, he had cut up a tortoise and a lamb, and then boiled them in a cauldron of bronze covered with a lid of the same. 1.49. Such, then, was the answer from Delphi delivered to Croesus. As to the reply which the Lydians received from the oracle of Amphiaraus when they had followed the due custom of the temple, I cannot say what it was, for nothing is recorded of it, except that Croesus believed that from this oracle too he had obtained a true answer. 1.50. After this, he tried to win the favor of the Delphian god with great sacrifices. He offered up three thousand beasts from all the kinds fit for sacrifice, and on a great pyre burnt couches covered with gold and silver, golden goblets, and purple cloaks and tunics; by these means he hoped the better to win the aid of the god, to whom he also commanded that every Lydian sacrifice what he could. ,When the sacrifice was over, he melted down a vast store of gold and made ingots of it, the longer sides of which were of six and the shorter of three palms' length, and the height was one palm. There were a hundred and seventeen of these. Four of them were of refined gold, each weighing two talents and a half; the rest were of gold with silver alloy, each of two talents' weight. ,He also had a figure of a lion made of refined gold, weighing ten talents. When the temple of Delphi was burnt, this lion fell from the ingots which were the base on which it stood; and now it is in the treasury of the Corinthians, but weighs only six talents and a half, for the fire melted away three and a half talents. 1.51. When these offerings were ready, Croesus sent them to Delphi, with other gifts besides: namely, two very large bowls, one of gold and one of silver. The golden bowl stood to the right, the silver to the left of the temple entrance. ,These too were removed about the time of the temple's burning, and now the golden bowl, which weighs eight and a half talents and twelve minae, is in the treasury of the Clazomenians, and the silver bowl at the corner of the forecourt of the temple. This bowl holds six hundred nine-gallon measures: for the Delphians use it for a mixing-bowl at the feast of the Divine Appearance. ,It is said by the Delphians to be the work of Theodorus of Samos, and I agree with them, for it seems to me to be of no common workmanship. Moreover, Croesus sent four silver casks, which stand in the treasury of the Corinthians, and dedicated two sprinkling-vessels, one of gold, one of silver. The golden vessel bears the inscription “Given by the Lacedaemonians,” who claim it as their offering. But they are wrong, ,for this, too, is Croesus' gift. The inscription was made by a certain Delphian, whose name I know but do not mention, out of his desire to please the Lacedaemonians. The figure of a boy, through whose hand the water runs, is indeed a Lacedaemonian gift; but they did not give either of the sprinkling-vessels. ,Along with these Croesus sent, besides many other offerings of no great distinction, certain round basins of silver, and a female figure five feet high, which the Delphians assert to be the statue of the woman who was Croesus' baker. Moreover, he dedicated his own wife's necklaces and girdles. 1.52. Such were the gifts which he sent to Delphi . To Amphiaraus, of whose courage and fate he had heard, he dedicated a shield made entirely of gold and a spear all of solid gold, point and shaft alike. Both of these were until my time at Thebes, in the Theban temple of Ismenian Apollo. 8.134. This man Mys is known to have gone to Lebadea and to have bribed a man of the country to go down into the cave of Trophonius and to have gone to the place of divination at Abae in Phocis. He went first to Thebes where he inquired of Ismenian Apollo (sacrifice is there the way of divination, as at Olympia), and moreover he bribed one who was no Theban but a stranger to lie down to sleep in the shrine of Amphiaraus. ,No Theban may seek a prophecy there, for Amphiaraus bade them by an oracle to choose which of the two they wanted and forgo the other, and take him either for their prophet or for their ally. They chose that he should be their ally. Therefore no Theban may lie down to sleep in that place.
3. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.23.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.23.3. This armament weighed anchor and started on its cruise, and the Peloponnesians, after remaining in Attica as long as their provisions lasted, retired through Boeotia by a different road to that by which they had entered. As they passed Oropus they ravaged the territory of Graea which is held by the Oropians from Athens, and reaching Peloponnese broke up to their respective cities.
4. Hyperides, Pro Euxenippo, 17, 16 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Herodas, Mimes, 4.79-4.84 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

6. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 14.17.1-14.17.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

14.17.1.  At the close of the year Micion was archon in Athens, and in Rome three military tribunes took over the consular magistracy, Titus Quinctius, Gaius Julius, and Aulus Mamilus. After these magistrates had entered office, the inhabitants of Oropus fell into civil strife and exiled some of their citizens. 14.17.2.  For a time the exiles undertook to effect their return by their own resources, but finding themselves unable to carry through their purpose, they persuaded the Thebans to send an army to assist them. 14.17.3.  The Thebans took the field against the Oropians, and becoming masters of the city, resettled the inhabitants some seven stades from the sea; and for some time they allowed them to have their own government, but after this they gave them Theban citizenship and attached their territory to Boeotia.
7. Philo of Alexandria, On The Embassy To Gaius, 78 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

78. For he began at first to liken himself to those beings who are called demigods, such as Bacchus, and Hercules, and the twins of Lacedaemon; turning into utter ridicule Trophonius, and Amphiaraus, and Amphilochus, and others of the same kind, with all their oracles and secret ceremonies, in comparison of his own power.
8. Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, 5.89 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Aelian, Nature of Animals, 9.33 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 48.35, 48.40-48.44 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Lucian, Alexander The False Prophet, 24, 22 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. So oracles and divine utterances were the order of the day, and much shrewdness he displayed, eking out mechanical ingenuity with obscurity, his answers to some being crabbed and ambiguous, and to others absolutely unintelligible. He did, however, distribute warning and encouragement according to his lights, and recommend treatments and diets; for he had, as I originally stated, a wide and serviceable acquaintance with drugs; he was particularly given to prescribing ‘cytmides,’ which were a salve prepared from goat’s fat, the name being of his own invention. For the realization of ambitions, advancement, or successions, he took care never to assign early dates; the formula was, ‘All this shall come to pass when it is my will, and when my prophet Alexander shall make prayer and entreaty on your behalf.’
12. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.34.4, 3.26.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.34.4. The Oropians have near the temple a spring, which they call the Spring of Amphiaraus; they neither sacrifice into it nor are wont to use it for purifications or for lustral water. But when a man has been cured of a disease through a response the custom is to throw silver and coined gold into the spring, for by this way they say that Amphiaraus rose up after he had become a god. Iophon the Cnossian, a guide, produced responses in hexameter verse, saying that Amphiaraus gave them to the Argives who were sent against Thebes . These verses unrestrainedly appealed to popular taste. Except those whom they say Apollo inspired of old none of the seers uttered oracles, but they were good at explaining dreams and interpreting the flights of birds and the entrails of victims. 3.26.1. From Oetylus to Thalamae the road is about eighty stades long. On it is a sanctuary of Ino and an oracle. They consult the oracle in sleep, and the goddess reveals whatever they wish to learn, in dreams. Bronze statues of Pasiphae and of Helios stand in the unroofed part of the sanctuary. It was not possible to see the one within the temple clearly, owing to the garlands, but they say this too is of bronze. Water, sweet to drink, flows from a sacred spring. Pasiphae is a title of the Moon, and is not a local goddess of the people of Thalamae .
13. Marinus, Vita Proclus, 7 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

14. Epigraphy, Epigr. Tou Oropou, 290, 294, 296-297, 276

15. Epigraphy, Erythrai, 205

16. Epigraphy, Ig I , 78

17. Epigraphy, Ig I , 78

18. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 2497, 1524

19. Epigraphy, Ig Iv ,1, 127

20. Epigraphy, Seg, 21.645, 44.505, 52.104

21. Epigraphy, Ig Ii3, 445

22. Epigraphy, Rhodes & Osborne Ghi, 81, 2

23. Epigraphy, Die Inschriften Von Pergamon, 161



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aelius aristides, and neokoroi Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 228
aelius aristides Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 15
agora (oropos) Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 65
aigina Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 310
alalkomeneion Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 21
alexander of abonuteichos Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 228
amphiaraia, personnel Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 16
amphiaraos, consulted by mys Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 275
amphiaraos, incubation reliefs Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 283
amphiaraos, incubation reliefs and representation of ram skins Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 283, 284
amphiaraos, oracle of Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 16
amphiaraos, therapeutic incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 275, 276, 277, 283, 284, 285, 286
amphiaraos Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 89
apodektai Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 89
aqueduct (amphiareion) Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 61, 65
aristophaness plutus incubation scene, evidence for bedding materials brought from home Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 284
artemidorus, and prescriptive dreams Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 15
artemidorus, dreams of asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 15
artemis, brauronia Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 89
asklepieia, cake offerings Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 194, 286
asklepieia, pig/piglet sacrifice Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 194
asklepieia, preliminary bloodless offerings and sacrifice Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 194, 286
asklepieia, role for neokoroi/zakoroi in incubation(?) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 228, 275, 276
asklepieia, role for priests or physicians in incubation(?) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 228
asklepieia, sacrificial ram skins used for incubation(?) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 286
asklepieia, structural evidence for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 146
asklepieia, written evidence for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 191, 194
asklepieia and lesser cult sites, paros Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 228
asklepios, as physician or surgeon in dreams Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 191, 228
asklepios, epigraphical terms for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 10
asklepios, in artemidorus Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 15
asklepios, prescriptions attributed to asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 191
asklepios, question of evolution in healing modus operandi Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 191
asklepios, specific ailments cured, abdominal/stomach ailment Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 191
asklepios, specific ailments cured, parasitic worm Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 228
asklepios, specific ailments cured, sciatica Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 191
asklepios, worshipers instructed in dreams to visit asklepieia Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 191
asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 146, 191, 194, 228
audience, and inscribed display Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 16
bathhouse (amphiareion) Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 61, 65, 75
boiotian koinon, and oropos Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 79, 80
boiotian koinon, and the amphiareion Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 79, 80
brauronion Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 310
buildings in the shrine of artemis Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 89
chaironeia, aftermath of battle (338) Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 77
cult personnel (greek), neokoros/nakoros Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 191, 228, 275, 276, 285
cult personnel (greek), zakoros Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 228
decrees, concerning the amphiareion Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 53, 61, 65, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 79, 80, 113
demeter Horster and Klöckner, Cult Personnel in Asia Minor and the Aegean Islands from the Hellenistic to the Imperial Period (2014) 53
demeter and kore Horster and Klöckner, Cult Personnel in Asia Minor and the Aegean Islands from the Hellenistic to the Imperial Period (2014) 10
demotics, political implications of Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 75
dialect Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 21, 74, 80
dreams (in greek and latin literature), aelius aristides, sacred tales Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 228
eleusis Horster and Klöckner, Cult Personnel in Asia Minor and the Aegean Islands from the Hellenistic to the Imperial Period (2014) 10, 53
eparche Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 79, 80, 113
epidauros asklepieion, presence of zakoroi Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 228
epidauros asklepieion, story of sons botching operation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 228
epidauros miracle inscriptions, comparison with lebena testimonies Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 191
epidauros miracle inscriptions, terms employed for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 10
epigraphic agents, ambitions of Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 76, 77
epigraphic agents, profile of Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 16, 76, 77
epigraphic agents, religious interests of Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 76, 77
epigraphic habits, external influence of Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 74, 75, 77
erase, erasure Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 79, 113
erchia Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 310
euergetes, euergetai Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 77
exile, exiles Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 80
find-spot location Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 53, 65
forgetting Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 16
fountain, at the amphiareion Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 61, 65, 75
glykon, and healing Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 228
gortyn Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 191
graia Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 21
guarantors Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 310
hieromnemones, ἱερῶν ἐπισκευασταί Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 89
houses, leasing of Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 310
incubation, extended incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 15
incubation, ritual incubation vs. private dream-divination Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 15
incubation, terms for incubation, non-technical (greek) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 10
incubation, terms for incubation (greek) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 10
incubation, terms for incubation structures (greek) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 15
incubation Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 16, 65, 73, 74, 75
incubation (greek), public nature Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 15, 276, 277
incubation (greek), question of sexes sleeping separately Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 628
incubation (greek), ram (and sheep) skins linked to incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 283, 284, 285, 286
independence, and epigraphical publication Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 73, 77
inscribed location, and subject matter Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 65
inscribed location, of classical inscriptions Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 61, 65
isocrates, adopts aphareus Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 310
koimeterion Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 65, 74
kos asklepieion, building d Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 146
kos asklepieion, porticoes Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 146
kos asklepieion, problem of where incubation practiced Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 146
kos asklepieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 146
kydathenaion Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 310
law, from brauron Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 89
law Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 113
leases, lessees Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 310
leases, rental Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 89
lebena asklepieion, epigraphical sources for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 191
lebena asklepieion, inscribed foundation narrative Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 191
lebena asklepieion, presence of neokoroi Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 191, 228
lebena asklepieion, surgery performed by asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 191
lebena asklepieion, testimonies with prescriptions Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 191
lebena asklepieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 191
lykourgos son of lykophron of boutadai Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 113
macedonians, oropian honours for Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 77, 113
magic, invocations for dreams in magical papyri Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 15
memory, and epigraphical display Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 16
memory, and selective inscription Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 16
merismos (allocation of revenues) Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 89
monumental reuse, and memory Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 16
monuments, interaction between Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 113
nymphs Horster and Klöckner, Cult Personnel in Asia Minor and the Aegean Islands from the Hellenistic to the Imperial Period (2014) 10
oropos, and eretria Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 21
oropos, and euboia Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 21
oropos, economic interest in Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 113
oropos, excavations at Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 21
oropos, periods of independence and external control Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 276, 277
oropos, pre-classical phase Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 21
oropos, θησαυρός Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 89
oropos amphiareion, animal sacrifice in leges sacrae linked to incubation(?) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 284, 285, 286
oropos amphiareion, archinos relief Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 283, 284
oropos amphiareion, bedding materials brought from home(?) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 284
oropos amphiareion, bench in incubation stoa Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 277
oropos amphiareion, incubation stoa Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 191, 276, 277, 628
oropos amphiareion, incubation stoa (original structure) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 277, 628
oropos amphiareion, leges sacrae pertaining to incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 275, 276, 277, 283, 284, 285, 286
oropos amphiareion, literary sources for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 275
oropos amphiareion, monetary offerings preceding treatment Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 285, 286
oropos amphiareion, possible presence of dogs Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 283
oropos amphiareion, presence of neokoroi Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 228, 275, 276, 285
oropos amphiareion, public identification of those incubating Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 276, 277
oropos amphiareion, ram sacrifice preceding incubation and use of skin(?) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 283, 284, 285, 286
oropos amphiareion, sexes sleeping separately Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 628
oropos amphiareion, terms for incubation in leges sacrae Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 10
oropos amphiareion, thesauros Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 286
oropos amphiareion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 275, 276, 277, 283, 284, 285, 286
pasiphae, sanctuary at thalamai, terminology associated with oracular function Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 10
pergamon asklepieion, buildings 27/28 and incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 146
pergamon asklepieion, great and small incubation structures Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 146
pergamon asklepieion, leges sacrae pertaining to incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 194
pergamon asklepieion, presence of nakoroi/neokoroi Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 228
pergamon asklepieion, therapeutai Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 146
pergamon asklepieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 146
peribomios (amphiareion) Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 61
phanodemos son of diyllos of thymaitadai Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 113
priest, athenian identity of Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 75
priest, duties of Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 16, 61, 65, 73, 76
priesthood, and athens Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 75
proposers Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 76, 77, 80
proxeny decrees, decrees of proxenia, earliest decrees at the amphiareion Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 77, 80
purchases, of landed property Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 310
pyraia Horster and Klöckner, Cult Personnel in Asia Minor and the Aegean Islands from the Hellenistic to the Imperial Period (2014) 10
rationes centesimarum Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 310
reinvention, and inscribed location Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 113
reinvention, and memory Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 16
reinvention, and selective inscription Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 113
rhamnous amphiareion, incubation relief Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 283
rome, romans Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 61, 65
sacred animals (greek), dogs at epidauros asklepieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 283
sacred regulations, chronology of Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 79, 80
sacred regulations Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 61, 65, 73, 74, 75, 113
sacred spring (amphiareion) Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 61, 65
senatus consultum Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 16, 21
sicyon Horster and Klöckner, Cult Personnel in Asia Minor and the Aegean Islands from the Hellenistic to the Imperial Period (2014) 10
stele, stelai Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 75, 76, 77, 113
syangela Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 77
temenos (τέμενος) Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 310
theatre of the altar (amphiareion) Wilding, Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos (2022) 61, 65
thebans, occupy oropos Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 89
thria Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 310
troizen asklepieion, testimony about worshiper urged to incubate at epidauros Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 10
trophonios (and trophonion), honey cakes as offerings' Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 286
zeus Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 310