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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4743
Epicurus, Letter To Herodotus, 78
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

653d. in the course of men’s lives; so the gods, in pity for the human race thus born to misery, have ordained the feasts of thanksgiving as periods of respite from their troubles; and they have granted them as companions in their feasts the Muses and Apollo the master of music, and Dionysus, that they may at least set right again their modes of discipline by associating in their feasts with gods. We must consider, then, whether the account that is harped on nowadays is true to nature? What it says is that, almost without exception, every young creature is able of keeping either its body or its tongue quiet
2. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.45, 1.85, 2.93 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.45. We have then a preconception of such a nature that we believe the gods to be blessed and immortal. For nature, which bestowed upon us an idea of the gods themselves, also engraved on our minds the belief that they are eternal and blessed. If this is so, the famous maxim of Epicurus truthfully enunciates that 'that which is blessed and eternal can neither know trouble itself nor cause trouble to another, and accordingly cannot feel either anger or favour, since all such things belong only to the weak.' "If we sought to attain nothing else beside piety in worshipping the gods and freedom from superstition, what has been said had sufficed; since the exalted nature of the gods, being both eternal and supremely blessed, would receive man's pious worship (for what is highest commands the reverence that is its due); and furthermore all fear of the divine power or divine anger would have been banished (since it is understood that anger and favour alike are excluded from the nature of a being at once blessed and immortal, and that these being eliminated we are menaced by no fears in regard to the powers above). But the mind strives to strengthen this belief by trying to discover the form of god, the mode of his activity, and the operation of his intelligence. 1.85. Well then, if the gods do not possess the appearance of men, as I have proved, nor some such form as that of the heavenly bodies, as you are convinced, why do you hesitate to deny their existence? You do not dare to. Well, that is no doubt wise — although in this matter it is not the public that you fear, but the gods themselves: I personally am acquainted with Epicureans who worship every paltry image, albeit I am aware that according to some people's view Epicurus really abolished the gods, but nominally retained them in order not to offend the people of Athens. Thus the first of his selected aphorisms or maxims, which you call the Kyriai Doxai, runs, I believe, thus: That which is blessed and immortal neither experiences trouble nor causes it to anyone. Now there are people who think that the wording of this maxim was intentional, though really it was due to the author's inability to express himself clearly; their suspicion does an injustice to the most guileless of mankind. 2.93. At this point must I not marvel that there should be anyone who can persuade himself that there are certain solid and indivisible particles of matter borne along by the force of gravity, and that the fortuitous collision of those particles produces this elaborate and beautiful world? I cannot understand why he who considers it possible for this to have occurred should not all think that, if a counts number of copies of the one-and‑twenty letters of alphabet, made of gold or what you will, were thrown together into some receptacle and then shaken out on the ground, it would be possible that they should produce the Annals of Ennius, all ready for the reader. I doubt whether chance could possibly succeed in producing even a single verse!
3. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 2.62-2.66, 3.31-3.40 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 10.118 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10.118. When on the rack, however, he will give vent to cries and groans. As regards women he will submit to the restrictions imposed by the law, as Diogenes says in his epitome of Epicurus' ethical doctrines. Nor will he punish his servants; rather he will pity them and make allowance on occasion for those who are of good character. The Epicureans do not suffer the wise man to fall in love; nor will he trouble himself about funeral rites; according to them love does not come by divine inspiration: so Diogenes in his twelfth book. The wise man will not make fine speeches. No one was ever the better for sexual indulgence, and it is well if he be not the worse.
5. Epicurus, Letter To Menoeceus, 124, 123

6. Epicurus, Letter To Herodotus, 74-77, 73

7. Epicurus, Letters, 97

8. Epicurus, Letters, 97

9. Epicurus, Vatican Sayings, 27

10. Epicurus, Kuriai Doxai, 1



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
accidental (kata sumbebêkos) Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
artefacts Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
atomism Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
atoms, arrangements of Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
atoms, combination of Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
beauty Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
dido Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 64
emergence Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
epicurus, and emergence Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
epicurus, and ethics gods Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
epicurus, and mechanism Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
epicurus, religious observance Allison, Saving One Another: Philodemus and Paul on Moral Formation in Community (2020) 60, 65
epicurus Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221; Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 71
explanation, and phenomena Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
explanation, and tranquillity Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
explanation, and understanding Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
explanation, direction of Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
explanation, mechanistic Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
explanation, multiple Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
explanations, and reduction Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
explanations, and teleology Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
explanations, and tranquillity Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
explanations Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
god, gods, epicurean Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 71
godlikeness Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 71
gods (epicurean), character (blessedness and incorruptibility) Allison, Saving One Another: Philodemus and Paul on Moral Formation in Community (2020) 60, 65
gods (epicurean), involvement in moral formation Allison, Saving One Another: Philodemus and Paul on Moral Formation in Community (2020) 60, 65
homer Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 64
immortal goods Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 71
imperishability Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 71
infinity Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
iopas Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 64
lucretius Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 64
moral formation, involvement of god/gods within Allison, Saving One Another: Philodemus and Paul on Moral Formation in Community (2020) 60, 65
odysseus Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 64
order Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
phaeacians Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 64
pneuma Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
properties, emergent Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
stoicism, sun, the size of Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 64
stoics, and pneuma Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
stoics, and providence Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
stoics, and the divine Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
structure, and function Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
time, and eternity Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
understanding (epistēmē), and happiness' Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 221
virgil Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 64
warren, james Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 71
weakness, of human nature Allison, Saving One Another: Philodemus and Paul on Moral Formation in Community (2020) 65