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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11719
Epicurus, Kuriai Doxai, 8
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Cicero, On Laws, 1.39 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, On Duties, 1.128 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.128. Nec vero audiendi sunt Cynici, aut si qui filerunt Stoici paene Cynici, qui reprehendunt et irrident, quod ea, quae turpia non sint, verbis flagitiosa ducamus, illa autem, quae turpia sint, nominibus appellemus suis. Latrocinari, fraudare, adulterare re turpe est, sed dicitur non obscene; liberis dare operam re honestum est, nomine obscenum; pluraque in ear sententiam ab eisdem contra verecundiam disputantur. Nos autem naturam sequamur et ab omni, quod abhorret ab oculorum auriumque approbatione, fugiamus; status incessus, sessio accubitio, vultus oculi manuum motus teneat illud decorum. 1.128.  But we should give no heed to the Cynics (or to some Stoics who are practically Cynics) who censure and ridicule us for holding that the mere mention of some actions that are not immoral is shameful, while other things that are immoral we call by their real names. Robbery, fraud, and adultery, for example, are immoral in deed, but it is not indecent to name them. To beget children in wedlock is in deed morally right; to speak of it is indecent. And they assail modesty with a great many other arguments to the same purport. But as for us, let us follow Nature and shun everything that is offensive to our eyes or our ears. So, in standing or walking, in sitting or reclining, in our expression, our eyes, or the movements of our hands, let us preserve what we have called "propriety.
3. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 2.1-2.19, 2.53-2.54 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Epicurus, Letter To Menoeceus, 129-131, 128



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
choices/avoidances, and hedonic calculus Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 29
cynics/cynicism, accused of shamelessness Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 39
cynics/cynicism, condemned/satirized by greek writers Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 39
desmond, william Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 39
economics, epicurean, and pleasure/pain Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 29
economics, epicurean, economics, philodemus account of Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 39
economics, epicurean Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 29
epicurus, economic commentary Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 29
epicurus/epicureanism Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 185
erler, michael Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 29
father, fatherhood Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 127
god, tetragram Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 127
hedonic calculus Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 29
hicks, benjamin Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 39
lucretius Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 185
metrodorus of lampsacus Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 39
persian-hellenistic period Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 127
philodemus of gadara, on economics Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 39
qumran' Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 127