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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4734
Epictetus, Discourses, 3.24.107
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 1.1-1.2, 1.11-1.36, 2.75, 3.2-3.3, 3.5, 3.25, 3.37, 3.83-3.84, 3.87-3.90, 3.93, 3.116, 7.66, 9.9 (1st cent. CE

2.75.  In like manner do the gods act, and especially the great King of Kings, Zeus, who is the common protector and father of men and gods. If any man proves himself a violent, unjust and lawless ruler, visiting his strength, not upon the enemy, but upon his subjects and friends; if he is insatiate of pleasures, insatiate of wealth, quick to suspect, implacable in anger, keen for slander, deaf to reason, knavish, treacherous, degraded, wilful, exalting the wicked, envious of his superiors, too stupid for education, regarding no man as friend nor having one, as though such a possession were beneath him, — 3.5.  when that man, I say, is at once a judge more observant of the law than an empanelled jury, a king of greater equity than the responsible magistrates in our cities, a general more courageous than the soldiers in the ranks, a man more assiduous in all his tasks than those who are forced to work, less covetous of luxury than those who have no means to indulge in luxury, kindlier to his subjects than a loving father to his children, more dreaded by his enemies than are the invincible and irresistible gods — how can one deny that such a man's fortune is a blessing, not to himself alone, but to all others as well? 3.25.  Accordingly, that I may not be open to the charge of flattery by my would‑be detractors, and that you on your part may not be accused of a wanting to be praised to your very face, I shall speak of the ideal king, of what sort he should be, and how he differs from the man who pretends to be a ruler but is in reality far from true dominion and kingship.
2. Epictetus, Discourses, 1.9.1, 3.22.94, 3.24.24-3.24.25, 3.24.31, 3.24.34-3.24.36, 3.24.95-3.24.103, 3.24.105, 3.24.108, 3.24.112-3.24.118, 3.26.29 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. New Testament, Philippians, 3.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.20. For our citizenship is in heaven, from where we also wait for a Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ;
4. Plutarch, Agesilaus, 33.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Plutarch, Comparison of Aemilius Paulus And Timoleon, 2.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Plutarch, Comparison of Aristides And Cato, 1.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Plutarch, Comparison of Lysander With Sulla, 5.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Plutarch, Demetrius, 1.7, 3.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Plutarch, Galba, 2.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Seneca The Younger, De Otio Sapientis (Dialogorum Liber Viii), 4.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 6.63 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

6.63. On being asked what he had gained from philosophy, he replied, This at least, if nothing else – to be prepared for every fortune. Asked where he came from, he said, I am a citizen of the world. Certain parents were sacrificing to the gods, that a son might be born to them. But, said he, do you not sacrifice to ensure what manner of man he shall turn out to be? When asked for a subscription towards a club, he said to the president:Despoil the rest; off Hector keep thy hands.The mistresses of kings he designated queens; for, said he, they make the kings do their bidding. When the Athenians gave Alexander the title of Dionysus, he said, Me too you might make Sarapis. Some one having reproached him for going into dirty places, his reply was that the sun too visits cesspools without being defiled.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alexander iii of makedon Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 73
cosmopolitanism Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 60
diogenes the cynic Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 60
domitian Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 73
good, appropriate actions (kathēkonta) Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 60
graeco-roman piety Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 60
law of nature/natural law, stoic politics Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 60
law of nature/natural law Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 60
nature/nature Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 60
otho Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 73
plutarch Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 73
roman empire as a unit Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 73
socrates Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 60
sparta Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 73
tiberius Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 73
trajan Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 73
vespasian' Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 73
zeno Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 60
zeus Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 60