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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4734
Epictetus, Discourses, 3.22.91
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Antisthenes, Fragments, 70, 75, 173 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2. Antisthenes, Fragments, 70, 75, 173 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Antisthenes of Rhodes, Fragments, 70, 75, 173 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

4. Nicocles, Fragments, 41, 40 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Epictetus, Discourses, 1.10.7-1.10.8, 1.10.10, 1.12.12-1.12.16, 1.16.15-1.16.21, 1.17.13-1.17.18, 1.21.2, 1.27.7, 1.27.9-1.27.10, 1.27.19, 1.28.28-1.28.33, 1.29.7-1.29.8, 1.29.29, 3.22.1-3.22.10, 3.22.13-3.22.20, 3.22.23, 3.22.25, 3.22.27-3.22.44, 3.22.47-3.22.51, 3.22.53-3.22.64, 3.22.67-3.22.85, 3.22.93-3.22.97, 3.22.99-3.22.107 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Heraclitus of Ephesus (Attributed Author), Letters, 4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 92.11-92.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Tertullian, Apology, 14 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

14. I wish now to review your sacred rites; and I pass no censure on your sacrificing, when you offer the worn-out, the scabbed, the corrupting; when you cut off from the fat and the sound the useless parts, such as the head and the hoofs, which in your house you would have assigned to the slaves or the dogs; when of the tithe of Hercules you do not lay a third upon his altar (I am disposed rather to praise your wisdom in rescuing something from being lost); but turning to your books, from which you get your training in wisdom and the nobler duties of life, what utterly ridiculous things I find!- that for Trojans and Greeks the gods fought among themselves like pairs of gladiators; that Venus was wounded by a man, because she would rescue her son Æneas when he was in peril of his life from the same Diomede; that Mars was almost wasted away by a thirteen months' imprisonment; that Jupiter was saved by a monster's aid from suffering the same violence at the hands of the other gods; that he now laments the fate of Sarpedon, now foully makes love to his own sister, recounting (to her) former mistresses, now for a long time past not so dear as she. After this, what poet is not found copying the example of his chief, to be a disgracer of the gods? One gives Apollo to king Admetus to tend his sheep; another hires out the building labours of Neptune to Laomedon. A well-known lyric poet, too - Pindar, I mean - sings of Æsculapius deservedly stricken with lightning for his greed in practising wrongfully his art. A wicked deed it was of Jupiter - if he hurled the bolt - unnatural to his grandson, and exhibiting envious feeling to the Physician. Things like these should not be made public if they are true; and if false, they should not be fabricated among people professing a great respect for religion. Nor indeed do either tragic or comic writers shrink from setting forth the gods as the origin of all family calamities and sins. I do not dwell on the philosophers, contenting myself with a reference to Socrates, who, in contempt of the gods, was in the habit of swearing by an oak, and a goat, and a dog. In fact, for this very thing Socrates was condemned to death, that he overthrew the worship of the gods. Plainly, at one time as well as another, that is, always truth is disliked. However, when rueing their judgment, the Athenians inflicted punishment on his accusers, and set up a golden image of him in a temple, the condemnation was in the very act rescinded, and his witness was restored to its former value. Diogenes, too, makes utter mock of Hercules and the Roman cynic Varro brings forward three hundred Joves, or Jupiters they should be called, all headless.
10. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 6.5, 6.42, 7.119 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

6.5. Being asked what was the height of human bliss, he replied, To die happy. When a friend complained to him that he had lost his notes, You should have inscribed them, said he, on your mind instead of on paper. As iron is eaten away by rust, so, said he, the envious are consumed by their own passion. Those who would fain be immortal must, he declared, live piously and justly. States, said he, are doomed when they are unable to distinguish good men from bad. Once, when he was applauded by rascals, he remarked, I am horribly afraid I have done something wrong.When brothers agree, no fortress is so strong as their common life, he said. The right outfit for a voyage, he said, is such as, even if you are shipwrecked, will go through the water with you. 6.42. Further, when Meidias assaulted him and went on to say, There are 3000 drachmas to your credit, the next day he took a pair of boxing-gauntlets, gave him a thrashing and said, There are 3000 blows to your credit.When Lysias the druggist asked him if he believed in the gods, How can I help believing in them, said he, when I see a god-forsaken wretch like you? Others give this retort to Theodorus. Seeing some one perform religious purification, he said, Unhappy man, don't you know that you can no more get rid of errors of conduct by sprinklings than you can of mistakes in grammar? He would rebuke men in general with regard to their prayers, declaring that they asked for those things which seemed to them to be good, not for such as are truly good. 7.119. They are also, it is declared, godlike; for they have a something divine within them; whereas the bad man is godless. And yet of this word – godless or ungodly – there are two senses, one in which it is the opposite of the term godly, the other denoting the man who ignores the divine altogether: in this latter sense, as they note, the term does not apply to every bad man. The good, it is added, are also worshippers of God; for they have acquaintance with the rites of the gods, and piety is the knowledge of how to serve the gods. Further, they will sacrifice to the gods and they keep themselves pure; for they avoid all acts that are offences against the gods, and the gods think highly of them: for they are holy and just in what concerns the gods. The wise too are the only priests; for they have made sacrifices their study, as also establishing holy places, purifications, and all the other matters appertaining to the gods.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agamemnon, negative example Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
antisthenes Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
atheism, accusations against, diogenes Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
clement of alexandria Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
cynic preacher, messenger of god Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
cynic preacher Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
cynics/cynicism, proto- Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
cynics/cynicism Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
diagoras of melos, (the atheist) Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
dialectic Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
diogenes, the cynic Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
epictetus, ethical paradigm Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
epictetus, self as example Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
epicurus Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
euripides Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
eusebius Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
exempla, teacher as model Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
free will Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
heracles/hercules Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
homer Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
julian Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
menemachus Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
moralists Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
myron, negative example Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
norden, eduard Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
odysseus Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
oenomaus of gadara Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
ophellius, negative example Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
personal example, plutarch Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
philosophy Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
plutarch, self as example Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
sage Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
seneca, self as example Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
stoicism, providence Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
stoicism, ps.-heraclitus Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
stoicism, sage Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
stoicism Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
theology, cynic Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611
thought, imitative model Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
virtue' Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 611