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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4734
Epictetus, Discourses, 3.22.79
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

18 results
1. Cicero, Academica, 2.136 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Nicocles, Fragments, 41, 40 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Philo of Alexandria, On Rewards And Punishments, 152 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

152. And the proselyte who has come over being lifted up on high by good fortune, will be a conspicuous object, being admired and pronounced happy in two most important particulars, in the first place because he has come over to God of his own accord, and also because he has received as a most appropriate reward a firm and sure habitation in heaven, such as one cannot describe. But the man of noble descent, who has adulterated the coinage of his noble birth, will be dragged down to the lowest depths, being hurled down to Tartarus and profound darkness, in order that all men who behold this example may be corrected by it, learning that God receives gladly virtue which grows out of hostility to him, utterly disregarding its original roots, but looking favourably on the whole trunk from its lowest foundation, because it has become useful and has changed its nature so as to become fruitful. XXVII.
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 1.52, 1.317, 2.73, 4.159 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.52. Accordingly, having given equal rank and honour to all those who come over, and having granted to them the same favours that were bestowed on the native Jews, he recommends those who are ennobled by truth not only to treat them with respect, but even with especial friendship and excessive benevolence. And is not this a reasonable recommendation? What he says is this. "Those men, who have left their country, and their friends, and their relations for the sake of virtue and holiness, ought not to be left destitute of some other cities, and houses, and friends, but there ought to be places of refuge always ready for those who come over to religion; for the most effectual allurement and the most indissoluble bond of affectionate good will is the mutual honouring of the one God. 1.317. For we should acknowledge only one relationship, and one bond of friendship, namely, a mutual zeal for the service of God, and a desire to say and do everything that is consistent with piety. And these bonds which are called relationships of blood, being derived from one's ancestors, and those connections which are derived from intermarriages and from other similar causes, must all be renounced, if they do not all hasten to the same end, namely, the honour of God which is the one indissoluble bond of all united good will. For such men will lay claim to a more venerable and sacred kind of relationship; 2.73. For while it does not permit them to lend on usury to their fellow countrymen, it has allowed them to receive interest from foreigners; calling the former, with great felicity of expression, their brothers, in order to prevent any one's grudging to give of his possessions to those who are as if by nature joint inheritors with themselves; but those who are not their fellow countrymen are called strangers, as is very natural. For the being a stranger shows that a person has no right to a participation in any thing, unless, indeed, any one out of an excess of virtue should treat even those in the conditions of strangers as kindred and related, from having been bred up under a virtuous state of things, and under virtuous laws which look upon what is virtuous alone as good. 4.159. For our lawgiver was aware beforehand, as was natural that one who was a countryman and a relation, and who had also an especial share in the sublimest relationship of all, (and that sublimest of relationships is one constitution and the same law, and one God whose chosen nation is a peculiar people
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Virtues, 218-219, 179 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

179. And what can this best of all things be except God? whose honours those men have attributed to beings which are not gods, honouring them beyond all reason and moderation, and, like empty minded people that they are, wholly forgetting him. All those men therefore who, although they did not originally choose to honour the Creator and Father of the universe, have yet changed and done so afterwards, having learnt to prefer to honour a single monarch rather than a number of rulers, we must look upon as our friends and kinsmen, since they display that greatest of all bonds with which to cement friendship and kindred, namely, a pious and God-loving disposition, and we ought to sympathise in joy with and to congratulate them, since even if they were blind previously they have now received their sight, beholding the most brilliant of all lights instead of the most profound darkness. XXXIV.
6. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 1.94 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.94. Therefore there is no need of addressing either command, or prohibition, or recommendation to the man who is perfect, and made according to the image of God; For the perfect man requires none of these things; but there is a necessity of addressing both command and prohibition to the wicked man, and recommendation and instruction to the ignorant man. Just as the perfect grammarian or perfect musician has need of no instruction in the matters which belong to his art, but the man whose theories on such subjects are imperfect stands in need of certain rules, as it were, which contain in themselves commands and prohibitions, and he who is only learning the art requires instruction.
7. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 1.62, 1.84, 3.42, 4.44, 21.6, 36.29-36.38, 57.6 (1st cent. CE

36.29.  Yet, despite my brave words to Hieroson, I was moved and heaved a sigh, as it were, when I bethought me of Homer and Plato."Well then," said I, "the term 'city' must be taken on the understanding that our sect is not literally defining the universe as a city; for that would be in direct conflict with our doctrine of the city, which, as I have said, the Stoics define as an organization of human beings; and at the same time it would possibly not be suitable or convincing, if, after stating in the strict sense of the term that the universe is a living creature, they should then call it a city 36.30.  for that the same thing is both a city and a living being is a proposition that, I imagine, no one would readily consent to entertain. Yet the present orderly constitution of the universe ever since the whole has been separated and divided into a considerable number of forms of plants and animals, mortal and immortal, yes, and into air and earth and water and fire, being nevertheless by nature in all these forms one thing and governed by one spirit and force — this orderly constitution, I say, the Stoics do in one way or another liken to a city because of the multitude of the creatures that are constantly either being born or else ending their existence in it, and, furthermore, because of the arrangement and orderliness of its administration. 36.31.  "This doctrine, in brief, aims to harmonize the human race with the divine, and to embrace in a single term everything endowed with reason, finding in reason the only sure and indissoluble foundation for fellowship and justice. For in keeping with that concept the term 'city' would be applied, not, of course, to an organization that has chanced to get mean or petty leaders nor to one which through tyranny or democracy or, in fact, through decarchy or oligarchy or any other similar product of imperfection, is being torn to pieces and made the victim of constant party faction. Nay, term would be applied rather to an organization that is governed by the sanest and noblest form of kingship, to one that is actually under royal goverce in accordance with law, in complete friendship and concord. 36.32.  And this, indeed, is precisely what the wisest and eldest ruler and law-giver ordains for all, both mortals and immortals, he who is the leader of all the heaven and lord of all being, himself thus expounding the term and offering his own administration as a pattern of the happy and blessed condition, he whom the divine bards, instructed by the Muses, praise in song and call the 'father of gods and men.' 36.33.  "For the chances are, indeed, that poets as a class are not utterly bad marksmen when they speak of sacred things and that they are not missing the mark when they use such expressions as that repeatedly; on the other hand, it is not likely that they have received a real initiation according to the rites and regulations of true initiates, or that with reference to the universe they know anything, if I may say so, which is true and clear. But we may think of them as merely like the attendants at the rites, who stand outside at the doors, decking portals and the altars which are in full view and attending to the other preparations of that kind but never passing within. Indeed that is the very reason why the poets call themselves 'attendants of the Muses,' not initiates or any other august name. 36.34.  So, as I was saying, it is reasonable to suppose that not only do those who busy themselves near some ritual, hard by the entrance to the sanctuary, gain some inkling of what is going on within, when either a lone mystic phrase rings out loudly, or fire appears above the enclosure, but also that there comes sometimes to the poets — I mean the very ancient poets — some utterance from the Muses, however brief, some inspiration of divine nature and of divine truth, like a flash of fire from the invisible. This is what happened to Homer and Hesiod when they were possessed by the Muses. 36.35.  But the poets who came after them in later days, bringing to stage and theatre naught but their own wisdom, uninitiate addressing initiate, have ofttimes disclosed imperfect patterns of holy rites; but, being applauded by the multitude, they tried in their own right to initiate the mob, actually, as we might say, building open booths for Bacchic rites at tragic crossroads."Yet all these poets in precisely the same fashion call the first and greatest god Father of the whole rational family collectively, yes, and King besides. 36.36.  And trusting to these poets men erect altars to Zeus the King and, what is more, some do not hesitate even to call him Father in their prayers, believing that there exists some such government and organization of the universe as that. Therefore, from that standpoint at least, it seems to me, they would not hesitate to apply the term 'home of Zeus' to the entire universe — if indeed he is father of all who live in it — yes, by Zeus, and his 'city' too, our Stoic similitude, to suggest the greater office of the god. 36.37.  For kingship is a word more appropriate to a city than to a home. For surely men would not apply the term King to him who is over all and then refuse to admit that the whole is governed by a king, nor would they admit that they are governed by a king and then deny that they are members of a state or that there is a kingly administration of the universe. And again, conceding 'administration,' they would not balk at accepting 'city,' or something very like it, as descriptive of that which is administered. 36.38.  "This, then, is the theory of the philosophers, a theory which sets up a noble and benevolent fellowship of gods and men which gives a share in law and citizenship, not to all living beings whatsoever, but only to such as have a share in reason and intellect, introducing a far better and more righteous code than that of Sparta, in accordance with which the Helots have no prospect of ever becoming Spartans, and consequently are constantly plotting against Sparta.
8. Epictetus, Discourses, 1.9.32, 1.10.7-1.10.8, 1.10.10, 1.12.12-1.12.16, 1.16.15-1.16.21, 1.17.13-1.17.18, 1.18.1, 1.21.2, 1.27.7, 1.27.9-1.27.10, 1.27.19, 1.28.28-1.28.33, 1.29.7-1.29.8, 1.29.29, 1.29.44, 2.18.28, 3.22.1-3.22.10, 3.22.13-3.22.20, 3.22.23, 3.22.25, 3.22.27-3.22.44, 3.22.47-3.22.51, 3.22.53-3.22.64, 3.22.67-3.22.78, 3.22.80-3.22.85, 3.22.91, 3.22.93-3.22.97, 3.22.99-3.22.107, 3.24.84-3.24.88 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Josephus Flavius, Against Apion, 2.28 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.28. 3. This is that novel account which the Egyptian Apion gives us concerning the Jews’ departure out of Egypt, and is no better than a contrivance of his own. But why should we wonder at the lies he tells us about our forefathers, when he affirms them to be of Egyptian original, when he lies also about himself? 2.28. 40. We have already demonstrated that our laws have been such as have always inspired admiration and imitation into all other men;
10. Musonius Rufus, Fragments, 15 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 9.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9.21. to those who are without law, as without law(not being without law toward God, but under law toward Christ), that Imight win those who are without law.
12. New Testament, Galatians, 6.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6.2. Bear one another'sburdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ.
13. Plutarch, Brutus, 4.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Plutarch, Comparison of Lucullus With Cimon, 2.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 92.11-92.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Lucian, Alexander The False Prophet, 2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. I confess to being a little ashamed both on your account and my own. There are you asking that the memory of arch scoundrel should be perpetuated in writing; here am I going seriously into an investigation of this sort — the doings of a person whose deserts entitled him not to be read about by the cultivated, but to be torn to pieces in the amphitheatre by apes or foxes, with a vast audience looking on. Well, well, if any one does cast reflections of that sort upon us, we shall at least have a precedent to plead. Arrian himself, a disciple of Epictetus[1], distinguished Roman, and product of lifelong culture as he was, had just our experience and shall make our defence. He condescended, that is, to put on record the life of the robber Tilliborus[2]. The robber we propose to immortalize was of a far more pestilent kind, following his profession not in the forests and mountains, but in cities; he was not content to overrun a Mysia or an Ida[3]; his booty came not from a few scantily populated districts of Asia; one may say that the scene of his depredations was the whole Roman Empire. [1] Arrian … Epictetus | Arrian wrote down the Stoic philosophy of Epictetus. He was also author of famous biographies and histories. [2] Tilliborus | This text by Arrian is no longer extant.6) [3] a Mysia or an Ida | Mysia - region near Troy; Ida - mountain near Troy.
18. Lucian, Apology, 12 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agamemnon, negative example Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
celibacy, in cynicism Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 16
cosmopolitanism Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 61
cynic preacher, messenger of god Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
cynic preacher Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
cynics Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 16
epictetus, ethical paradigm Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
epictetus, self as example Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
epiktetos Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 74
exempla, teacher as model Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
law of nature/natural law, stoic politics Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 61
law of nature/natural law Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 61
literature Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 16
loukianos Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 74
marcus aurelius Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 74
marriage, literary arguments against Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 16
marriage, literary arguments for Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 16
menemachus Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
misogyny, vs. misogamy Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 16
moralists Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
myron, negative example Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
nature/nature Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 61
ophellius, negative example Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
personal example, plutarch Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
philosophy, anti-marriage Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 16
plutarch, self as example Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
plutarch Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 74
pro-marriage Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 16
roman empire as a unit Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 74
seneca, self as example Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
sparta' Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 74
stoics Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 16
thought, imitative model Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 298
virtue Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 61
zeno Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 61
zeus Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 61