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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4734
Epictetus, Discourses, 3.19.1
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

24 results
1. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 2.57 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 3.42, 4.97 (1st cent. CE

3. Epictetus, Discourses, 1.12.24, 2.2.4, 2.5.8, 2.17.22, 3.2.16, 3.3.10, 3.5.7, 3.7.7, 3.13.11, 3.15.13, 3.16.3, 3.16.7, 3.16.15-3.16.16, 3.19.2, 3.22.42, 3.23.30, 3.23.37, 3.30, 3.37, 4.1.1, 4.1.56-4.1.60, 4.1.76-4.1.79, 4.1.110, 4.1.128-4.1.131, 4.7.10-4.7.11, 4.9.10, 4.10.3, 4.13.24 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Epictetus, Enchiridion, 1.3, 33.16, 53.1-53.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 1.44, 1.209 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.44. Now he that governed the elephant was but a private man; and had he proved to be Antiochus, Eleazar had performed nothing more by this bold stroke than that it might appear he chose to die, when he had the bare hope of thereby doing a glorious action; 1.44. This charge fell like a thunderbolt upon Herod, and put him into disorder; and that especially, because his love to her occasioned him to be jealous, and because he considered with himself that Cleopatra was a shrewd woman, and that on her account Lysanias the king was taken off, as well as Malichus the Arabian; for his fear did not only extend to the dissolving of his marriage, but to the danger of his life. 1.209. These men said, that by committing the public affairs to the management of Antipater and of his sons, he sat down with nothing but the bare name of a king, without any of its authority; and they asked him how long he would so far mistake himself, as to breed up kings against his own interest; for that they did not now conceal their government of affairs any longer, but were plainly lords of the nation, and had thrust him out of his authority; that this was the case when Herod slew so many men without his giving him any command to do it, either by word of mouth, or by his letter, and this in contradiction to the law of the Jews; who therefore, in case he be not a king, but a private man, still ought to come to his trial, and answer it to him, and to the laws of his country, which do not permit anyone to be killed till he had been condemned in judgment.
6. Musonius Rufus, Dissertationum A Lucio Digestarum Reliquiae, 9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. New Testament, Acts, 4.13 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.13. Now when they saw the boldness of Peter and John, and had perceived that they were unlearned and ignorant men, they marveled. They recognized that they had been with Jesus.
8. New Testament, Galatians, 2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Plutarch, Comparison of Numa With Lycurgus, 1.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.1. Now that we have recounted the lives of Numa and Lycurgus, and both lie clearly before us, we must attempt, even though the task be difficult, to assemble and put together their points of difference. For their points of likeness are obvious from their careers: their wise moderation, their piety, their talent for governing and educating, and their both deriving their laws from a divine source. But each also performed noble deeds peculiar to himself. To begin with, Numa accepted, but Lycurgus resigned, a kingdom.
10. Plutarch, On Common Conceptions Against The Stoics, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Seneca The Younger, De Otio Sapientis (Dialogorum Liber Viii), 4.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Seneca The Younger, De Vita Beata (Dialogorum Liber Vii), 15.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 37.3, 54.7, 61.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Lucian, Disowned, 26 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Lucian, Apology, 12 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Lucian, On Mourning, 2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. The vulgar (as philosophers call the generality of mankind), implicitly taking as their text book the fictions of Homer and Hesiod and other poets, assume the existence of a deep subterranean hole called Hades; spacious, murky, and sunless, but by some mysterious means sufficiently lighted to render all its details visible. Its king is a brother of Zeus, one Pluto; whose name — so an able philologer assures me — contains a complimentary allusion to his ghostly wealth. As to the nature of his government, and the condition of his subjects, the authority allotted to him extends over all the dead, who, from the moment that they come under his control, are kept in unbreakable fetters; Shades are on no account permitted to return to Earth; to this rule there have been only two or three exceptions since the beginning of the world, and these were made for very urgent reasons.
17. Lucian, The Passing of Peregrinus, 18, 13 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Lucian, The Runaways, 21 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. Lucian, The Sky-Man, 16 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Such was the entertainment afforded me by royalty; private life was much more amusing; for I could make that out too. I saw Hermodorus the Epicurean perjuring himself for 40 pounds, Agathocles the Stoic suing a pupil for his fees, lawyer Clinias stealing a bowl from the temple of Asclepius, and Herophilus the cynic sleeping in a brothel. Not to mention the multitude of burglars, litigants, usurers, duns; oh, it was a fine representative show!Fr. I must say, Menippus, I should have liked the details here too; it all seems to have been very much to your taste.Me. I could not go through the whole of it, even to please you; to take it in with the eyes kept one busy. But the main divisions were very much what Homer gives from the shield of Achilles: here junketings and marriages, there courts and councils, in another compartment a sacrifice, and hard by a mourning. If I glanced at Getica, I would see the Getae at war; at Scythia, there were the Scythians wandering about on their waggons; half a turn in another direction gave me Egyptians at the plough, or Phoenicians chaffering, Cilician pirates, Spartan flagellants, Athenians at law.
20. Lucian, The Lover of Lies, 9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Lucian, A True Story, 2.31 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Lucian, Philosophies For Sale, 10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

23. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.94, 7.96 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.94. Good in general is that from which some advantage comes, and more particularly what is either identical with or not distinct from benefit. Whence it follows that virtue itself and whatever partakes of virtue is called good in these three senses – viz. as being (1) the source from which benefit results; or (2) that in respect of which benefit results, e.g. the virtuous act; or (3) that by the agency of which benefit results, e.g. the good man who partakes in virtue.Another particular definition of good which they give is the natural perfection of a rational being qua rational. To this answers virtue and, as being partakers in virtue, virtuous acts and good men; as also its supervening accessories, joy and gladness and the like. 7.96. Similarly of things evil some are mental evils, namely, vices and vicious actions; others are outward evils, as to have a foolish country or a foolish friend and the unhappiness of such; other evils again are neither mental nor outward, e.g. to be yourself bad and unhappy.Again, goods are either of the nature of ends or they are the means to these ends, or they are at the same time end and means. A friend and the advantages derived from him are means to good, whereas confidence, high-spirit, liberty, delight, gladness, freedom from pain, and every virtuous act are of the nature of ends.
24. Stobaeus, Eclogues, None



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
apatheia, freedom from, eradication of, emotion (; emotions accepted by stoics during training Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 51
apatheia, freedom from, eradication of, emotion (; some emotions for stoics compatible with apatheia, esp. eupatheiai and the right kind of homosexual love Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 51
bonhöffer, adolf Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 51
bren, tad Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 51
caution (eulabeia), stoic eupatheia Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 51
chrysippus, stoic (already in antiquity, views seen as orthodox for stoics tended to be ascribed to chrysippus), eupatheia distinguished from emotion as being true judgement, not disobedient to reason and not unstable Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 51
cleanthes, as author of the hymn Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 66
cosmopolitanism Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 66
crete vii Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
divine being, cronus Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
divine being, destiny Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
divine being, hermes Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
economics, wealth Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
education Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
egypt Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
emotions, identified with judgements by chrysippus Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 51
epictetus, stoic, certain emotions useful in training Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 51
epictetus, stoic, questioning appearances, assessing for indifference and training for this Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 180
epictetus, stoic Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 180
eupatheiai, equanimous states, distinguished from emotion (pathos) by being true judgements, not disobedient to reason and not unstable Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 51
eupatheiai, equanimous states, eulabeia (caution) Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 51
eupatheiai, equanimous states, eutolmia, good mettle Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 51
eupatheiai, equanimous states, khara (joy) Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 51
freedom (eleutheria) Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 66
honor Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
indifferents, preferred and dispreferred, relation to therapy Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 180
joy (khara, latin gaudium), stoic eupatheia Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 51
king, emperor, marcus aurelius Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
law of nature/natural law, stoic politics Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 66
mind, observation Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
nature, natural phenomena, earth, land Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
nature, natural phenomena, heaven, sky Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
necessity/require (anagkē, anagkazō) Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 66
philo of alexandria, jewish philosopher, confused with bites Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 51
philo of alexandria, jewish philosopher, eupatheiai Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 51
philo of alexandria, jewish philosopher, eutolmia, good mettle Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 51
philosophy, cynic Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
philosophy, epicurean Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
philosophy, stoic Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
philosophy Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
progressing, emotions can be useful to the progressing novice Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 51
punishment Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
rhetoric, dialogue Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
rhetoric, satire Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
sage, stoic Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 51
slavery Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 66
socrates Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 66
therapy, only restricted appeal to indifference Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 180
tyranny Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
value (axia) Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 66
will, will (boulēsis) as a eupatheia Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 51
zeno of citium, stoic, hence different conception of freedom from emotion(apatheia)' Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 180
zeus Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 66