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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4734
Epictetus, Discourses, 2.17.22
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

491a. Call. I believe, on my soul, you absolutely cannot ever stop talking of cobblers and fullers, cooks and doctors, as though our discussion had to do with them. Soc. Then will you tell me in what things the superior and wiser man has a right to the advantage of a larger share? Or will you neither put up with a suggestion from me nor make one yourself? Call. Why, I have been making mine for sometime past. First of all
2. Epictetus, Discourses, 1.1.10, 1.1.12-1.1.13, 1.4.26, 1.6.3, 1.6.7, 1.12.2-1.12.3, 1.12.5, 1.12.24, 1.14, 1.14.1-1.14.2, 1.14.4-1.14.6, 1.14.9-1.14.10, 1.16.15-1.16.16, 1.17.21-1.17.23, 1.19.11-1.19.13, 1.24.1, 1.25.1-1.25.6, 1.28.7-1.28.9, 2.2.4, 2.5.8, 2.8.1-2.8.2, 2.8.10-2.8.11, 2.14.11-2.14.13, 2.17.19-2.17.21, 2.17.23-2.17.26, 2.17.29, 3.2.16, 3.3.10, 3.5.7, 3.13.4, 3.13.11, 3.13.13, 3.19.1, 3.22.42, 3.22.56, 3.24.18, 3.24.60, 3.24.112-3.24.117, 4.1.1, 4.1.56-4.1.60, 4.1.76-4.1.79, 4.1.89-4.1.90, 4.1.103, 4.1.110, 4.1.119, 4.1.128-4.1.131, 4.1.146, 4.4.39, 4.7.10-4.7.11, 4.8.30-4.8.32, 4.13.24 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Epictetus, Enchiridion, 1.3, 53.1-53.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Epictetus, Fragments, 11 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. New Testament, Galatians, 2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Seneca The Younger, De Otio Sapientis (Dialogorum Liber Viii), 4.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Seneca The Younger, De Vita Beata (Dialogorum Liber Vii), 15.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 37.3, 54.7, 61.3, 107.11, 108.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Seneca The Younger, Thyestes, 345-403, 789-884, 344 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 26.105, 50.50-50.51 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.122, 7.180 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.122. though indeed there is also a second form of slavery consisting in subordination, and a third which implies possession of the slave as well as his subordination; the correlative of such servitude being lordship; and this too is evil. Moreover, according to them not only are the wise free, they are also kings; kingship being irresponsible rule, which none but the wise can maintain: so Chrysippus in his treatise vindicating Zeno's use of terminology. For he holds that knowledge of good and evil is a necessary attribute of the ruler, and that no bad man is acquainted with this science. Similarly the wise and good alone are fit to be magistrates, judges, or orators, whereas among the bad there is not one so qualified. 7.180. So renowned was he for dialectic that most people thought, if the gods took to dialectic, they would adopt no other system than that of Chrysippus. He had abundance of matter, but in style he was not successful. In industry he surpassed every one, as the list of his writings shows; for there are more than 705 of them. He increased their number by arguing repeatedly on the same subject, setting down anything that occurred to him, making many corrections and citing numerous authorities. So much so that in one of his treatises he copied out nearly the whole of Euripides' Medea, and some one who had taken up the volume, being asked what he was reading, replied, The Medea of Chrysippus.
12. Origen, On First Principles, 3.2.2 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3.2.2. We, however, who see the reason (of the thing) more clearly, do not hold this opinion, taking into account those (sins) which manifestly originate as a necessary consequence of our bodily constitution. Must we indeed suppose that the devil is the cause of our feeling hunger or thirst? Nobody, I think, will venture to maintain that. If, then, he is not the cause of our feeling hunger and thirst, wherein lies the difference when each individual has attained the age of puberty, and that period has called forth the incentives of the natural heat? It will undoubtedly follow, that as the devil is not the cause of our feeling hunger and thirst, so neither is he the cause of that appetency which naturally arises at the time of maturity, viz., the desire of sexual intercourse. Now it is certain that this cause is not always so set in motion by the devil that we should be obliged to suppose that bodies would nor possess a desire for intercourse of that kind if the devil did not exist. Let us consider, in the next place, if, as we have already shown, food is desired by human beings, not from a suggestion of the devil, but by a kind of natural instinct, whether, if there were no devil, it were possible for human experience to exhibit such restraint in partaking of food as never to exceed the proper limits; i.e., that no one would either take otherwise than the case required, or more than reason would allow; and so it would result that men, observing due measure and moderation in the matter of eating, would never go wrong. I do not think, indeed, that so great moderation could be observed by men (even if there were no instigation by the devil inciting thereto), as that no individual, in partaking of food, would go beyond due limits and restraint, until he had learned to do so from long usage and experience. What, then, is the state of the case? In the matter of eating and drinking it was possible for us to go wrong, even without any incitement from the devil, if we should happen to be either less temperate or less careful (than we ought); and are we to suppose, then, in our appetite for sexual intercourse, or in the restraint of our natural desires, our condition is not something similar? I am of opinion, indeed, that the same course of reasoning must be understood to apply to other natural movements as those of covetousness, or of anger, or of sorrow, or of all those generally which through the vice of intemperance exceed the natural bounds of moderation. There are therefore manifest reasons for holding the opinion, that as in good things the human will is of itself weak to accomplish any good (for it is by divine help that it is brought to perfection in everything); so also, in things of an opposite nature we receive certain initial elements, and, as it were, seeds of sins, from those things which we use agreeably to nature; but when we have indulged them beyond what is proper, and have not resisted the first movements to intemperance, then the hostile power, seizing the occasion of this first transgression, incites and presses us hard in every way, seeking to extend our sins over a wider field, and furnishing us human beings with occasions and beginnings of sins, which these hostile powers spread far and wide, and, if possible, beyond all limits. Thus, when men at first for a little desire money, covetousness begins to grow as the passion increases, and finally the fall into avarice takes place. And after this, when blindness of mind has succeeded passion, and the hostile powers, by their suggestions, hurry on the mind, money is now no longer desired, but stolen, and acquired by force, or even by shedding human blood. Finally, a confirmatory evidence of the fact that vices of such enormity proceed from demons, may be easily seen in this, that those individuals who are oppressed either by immoderate love, or incontrollable anger, or excessive sorrow, do not suffer less than those who are bodily vexed by devils. For it is recorded in certain histories, that some have fallen into madness from a state of love, others from a state of anger, not a few from a state of sorrow, and even from one of excessive joy; which results, I think, from this, that those opposing powers, i.e., those demons, having gained a lodgment in their minds which has been already laid open to them by intemperance, have taken complete possession of their sensitive nature, especially when no feeling of the glory of virtue has aroused them to resistance.
13. Stobaeus, Eclogues, None



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ailios aristeides Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 132
anger Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
atreus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
chorus, choral Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
chrysippus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
cleanthes, as author of the hymn Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 66
cosmopolitanism Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 66
craft/craftsman (technē) Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 65
demons Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 308
desires Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 308
diogenes laertius Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
epiktetos Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 132
exousia Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 65
fear Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
freedom Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 308
freedom (eleutheria) Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 65, 66
god, gods Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 132
hercules Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
hero Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
horror Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
incoercibility Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 308
infanticide Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
law of nature/natural law, stoic politics Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 65, 66
marcus aurelius Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 132
medea Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
metre Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
monotheism Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 132
murder Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
necessity/require (anagkē, anagkazō) Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 65, 66
nurse Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
oedipus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
passion Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
perfection Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 308
phaedra Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
philosophy Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
platonism Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 65
plot Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
polytheism Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 132
possessions Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 308
power Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247; Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 308
reason (divine) Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 308
sin Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 308
slavery Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 65, 66
socrates Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 65, 66
stoic Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
stoicism Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 308
the world Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 308
thyestes Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
tyrants' Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 308
value (axia) Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 65, 66
vengeance Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
vice Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247
zeus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 247; Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 132; Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 65, 66