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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4650
Empedocles, Fragments, 17


nanI shall tell thee a twofold tale. At one time it grew to be one only out of many; at another, it divided up to be many instead of one. There is a double becoming of perishable things and a double passing away. The coming together of all things brings one generation into being and destroys it; 5the other grows up and is scattered as things become divided. And these things never cease continually changing places, at one time all uniting in one through Love, at another each borne in different directions by the repulsion of Strife. Thus, as far as it is their nature to grow into one out of many, 10and to become many once more when the one is parted asunder, so far they come into being and their life abides not. But, inasmuch as they never cease changing their places continually, so far they are ever immovable as they go round the circle of existence.· · · · · · · ·But come, hearken to my words, for it is learning that increaseth wisdom. 15As I said before, when I declared the heads of my discourse, I shall tell thee a twofold tale. At one time it grew together to be one only out of many, at another it parted asunder so as to be many instead of one;—Fire and Water and Earth and the mighty height of Air; dread Strife, too, apart from these, of equal weight to each, 20and Love in their midst, equal in length and breadth. Her do thou contemplate with thy mind, nor sit with dazed eyes. It is she that is known as being implanted in the frame of mortals. It is she that makes them have thoughts of love and work the works of peace. They call her by the names of Joy and Aphrodite. 25Her has no mortal yet marked moving round among them,[9] but do thou attend to the undeceitful ordering of my discourse.For all these are equal and alike in age, yet each has a different prerogative and its own peculiar nature, but they gain the upper hand in turn when the time comes round. 30And nothing comes into being besides these, nor do they pass away; for, if they had been passing away continually, they would not be now, and what could increase this All and whence could it come? How, too, could it perish, since no place is empty of these things? There are these alone; 35but, running through one another, they become now this, now that,[10] and like things evermore.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Heraclitus of Ephesus, Fragments, 53, 64, 123 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Parmenides, Fragments, 13 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Anaxagoras, Fragments, 12 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Empedocles, Fragments, 112, 115, 117-118, 128, 139, 146, 21, 6, 109 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

22b. and the rest, thinking that there I should prove by actual test that I was less learned than they. So, taking up the poems of theirs that seemed to me to have been most carefully elaborated by them, I asked them what they meant, that I might at the same time learn something from them. Now I am ashamed to tell you the truth, gentlemen; but still it must be told. For there was hardly a man present, one might say, who would not speak better than they about the poems they themselves had composed. So again in the case of the poets also I presently recognized this
6. Plato, Ion, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

534a. just as the Corybantian worshippers do not dance when in their senses, so the lyric poets do not indite those fine songs in their senses, but when they have started on the melody and rhythm they begin to be frantic, and it is under possession—as the bacchants are possessed, and not in their senses, when they draw honey and milk from the rivers—that the soul of the lyric poets does the same thing, by their own report. For the poets tell us, I believe, that the songs they bring us are the sweets they cull from honey-dropping fount
7. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

245a. ills is found. Socrates. And a third kind of possession and madness comes from the Muses. This takes hold upon a gentle and pure soul, arouses it and inspires it to songs and other poetry, and thus by adorning countless deeds of the ancients educates later generations. But he who without the divine madness comes to the doors of the Muses, confident that he will be a good poet by art, meets with no success, and the poetry of the sane man vanishes into nothingness before that of the inspired madmen.
8. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.136-1.137, 1.926-1.950 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Vergil, Georgics, 2.476, 2.486, 3.284-3.285, 3.289, 3.291-3.292, 3.294 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.476. of their hard tooth, whose gnawing scars the stem. 2.486. Grim masks of hollowed bark assume, invoke 3.284. Learns to fling wrath into his horns, with blow 3.285. Provokes the air, and scattering clouds of sand 3.289. As in mid ocean when a wave far of 3.291. Its rounded breast, and, onward rolled to land 3.292. Falls with prodigious roar among the rocks 3.294. Upseethe in swirling eddies, and disgorge
10. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, 6.2.27 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

11. Heraclitus Lesbius, Fragments, 53, 64, 123



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
amor, poetry and Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 191
analogy Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 179
anaxagoras Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 179
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 191
anthropomorphism Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 179
apologetics vi deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 204
breathing, see pneuma King, Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity (2006) 173
change, in philosophy Neusner Green and Avery-Peck, Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points (2022) 26
conversion deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 204
cosmology Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 179
daimonic cycle Neusner Green and Avery-Peck, Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points (2022) 26, 27
diogenes of apollonia Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 179
empedocles Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 179; Neusner Green and Avery-Peck, Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points (2022) 26, 27; deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 204
furor Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 191
gods Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 179
heraclitus Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 179; deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 204
imagery, dionysiac Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 191
images Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 179
kuhn, t. s., language and reality, problem of Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 179
labor, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 191
law Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 179
love Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 179
meaning Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 179
mind Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 179
paradox Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 179
parmenides Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 179
perception, sense organs King, Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity (2006) 173
plagiarism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 204
plato Neusner Green and Avery-Peck, Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points (2022) 27
plato / (neo-)platonism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 204
pneuma, see breathing King, Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity (2006) 173
poetry and poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 191
politics, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 191
pythagoras / (neo-)pythagoreanism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 204
religion Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 179
semantic stretch Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 179
soul (psyche), as pneuma King, Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity (2006) 173
soul (psyche), definition of King, Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity (2006) 173
stoicism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 204
theology Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 179
universe, organization, unity of' King, Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity (2006) 173
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 191
xenophanes Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 179
zeus deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 204