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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4527
Dionysius Of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 2.63.4


nan "Julius, announce to the Romans from me, that the genius to whom I was allotted at my birth is conducting me to the gods, now that I have finished my mortal life, and that I am Quirinus." Numa, having reduced his whole system of religious laws to writing, divided them into eight parts, that being the number of the different classes of religious ceremonies. <


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Cicero, Republic, 2.20 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.20. us ne pos ei us, ut di xeru nt quidam, e x filia. Quo autem ille mor tuus, e odem est an no na tus Si moni des Ol ympia de se xta et quin qua gesima, ut f acilius intel legi pos sit tu m de Ro mu li inmortalitate creditum, cum iam inveterata vita hominum ac tractata esset et cognita. Sed profecto tanta fuit in eo vis ingenii atque virtutis, ut id de Romulo Proculo Iulio, homini agresti, crederetur, quod multis iam ante saeculis nullo alio de mortali homines credidissent; qui inpulsu patrum, quo illi a se invidiam interitus Romuli pellerent, in contione dixisse fertur a se visum esse in eo colle Romulum, qui nunc Quirinalis vocatur; eum sibi mandasse, ut populum rogaret, ut sibi eo in colle delubrum fieret; se deum esse et Quirinum vocari.
2. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 2.56.3-2.56.4, 2.63.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.56.3.  But those who write the more plausible accounts say that he was killed by his own people; and the reason they allege for his murder is that he released without the common consent, contrary to custom, the hostages he had taken from the Veientes, and that he no longer comported himself in the same manner toward the original citizens and toward those who were enrolled later, but showed greater honour to the former and slighted the latter, and also because of his great cruelty in the punishment of delinquents (for instance, he had ordered a group of Romans who were accused of brigandage against the neighbouring peoples to be hurled down the precipice after he had sat alone in judgment upon them, although they were neither of mean birth nor few in number), but chiefly because he now seemed to be harsh and arbitrary and to be exercising his power more like a tyrant than a king. 2.56.4.  For these reasons, they say, the patricians formed a conspiracy against him and resolved to slay him; and having carried out the deed in the senate-house, they divided his body into several pieces, that it might not be seen, and then came out, each one hiding his part of the body under his robes, and afterwards burying it in secret. 2.63.3.  He also ordered that Romulus himself, as one who had shown a greatness beyond mortal nature, should be honoured, under the name of Quirinus, by the erection of a temple and by sacrifices throughout the year. For while the Romans were yet in doubt whether divine providence or human treachery had been the cause of his disappearance, a certain man, named Julius, descended from Ascanius, who was a husbandman and of such a blameless life that he would never have told an untruth for his private advantage, arrived in the Forum and said that, as he was coming in from the country, he saw Romulus departing from the city fully armed and that, as he drew near to him, he heard him say these words:
3. Livy, History, 1.16.5-1.16.8 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. New Testament, Mark, 6.3, 6.7-6.13, 12.35, 13.21, 15.32 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6.3. Isn't this the carpenter, the son of Mary, and brother of James, Joses, Judas, and Simon? Aren't his sisters here with us?" They were offended at him. 6.7. He called to himself the twelve, and began to send them out two by two; and he gave them authority over the unclean spirits. 6.8. He charged them that they should take nothing for their journey, except a staff only: no bread, no wallet, no money in their purse 6.9. but to wear sandals, and not put on two tunics. 6.10. He said to them, "Wherever you enter into a house, stay there until you depart from there. 6.11. Whoever will not receive you nor hear you, as you depart from there, shake off the dust that is under your feet for a testimony against them. Assuredly, I tell you, it will be more tolerable for Sodom and Gomorrah in the day of judgment than for that city! 6.12. They went out and preached that people should repent. 6.13. They cast out many demons, and anointed many with oil who were sick, and healed them. 12.35. Jesus responded, as he taught in the temple, "How is it that the scribes say that the Christ is the son of David? 13.21. Then if anyone tells you, 'Look, here is the Christ!' or, 'Look, there!' don't believe it. 15.32. Let the Christ, the King of Israel, now come down from the cross, that we may see and believe him." Those who were crucified with him insulted him.
5. Plutarch, Romulus, 27.5, 28.1-28.3, 29.8 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

27.5. And yet Scipio’s dead body lay exposed for all to see, and all who beheld it formed therefrom some suspicion and conjecture of what had happened to it; whereas Romulus disappeared suddenly, and no portion of his body or fragment of his clothing remained to be seen. But some conjectured that the senators, convened in the temple of Vulcan, fell upon him and slew him, then cut his body in pieces, put each a portion into the folds of his robe, and so carried it away. 28.1. At this pass, then, it is said that one of the patricians, a man of noblest birth, and of the most reputable character, a trusted and intimate friend also of Romulus himself, and one of the colonists from Alba, Julius Proculus by name, Cf. Livy, i. 16, 5-8. went into the forum and solemnly swore by the most sacred emblems before all the people that, as he was travelling on the road, he had seen Romulus coming to meet him, fair and stately to the eye as never before, and arrayed in bright and shining armour. 28.2. He himself, then, affrighted at the sight, had said: O King, what possessed thee, or what purpose hadst thou, that thou hast left us patricians a prey to unjust and wicked accusations, and the whole city sorrowing without end at the loss of its father? Whereupon Romulus had replied: It was the pleasure of the gods, 0 Proculus, from whom I came, that I should be with mankind only a short time, and that after founding a city destined to be the greatest on earth for empire and glory, I should dwell again in heaven. So farewell, and tell the Romans that if they practise self-restraint, and add to it valour, they will reach the utmost heights of human power. And I will be your propitious deity, Quirinus. 28.3. These things seemed to the Romans worthy of belief, from the character of the man who related them, and from the oath which he had taken; moreover, some influence from heaven also, akin to inspiration, laid hold upon their emotions, for no man contradicted Proculus, but all put aside suspicion and calumny and prayed to Quirinus, and honoured him as a god.
6. Suetonius, Augustus, a b c d\n0 "7.2" "7.2" "7 2" (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeneas Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 50
aeolian, aeolic, aeolism Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 255
apotheosis Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 49
appearances Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 50
augustus Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 255; Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 50
belief, fama Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 139
c. norbanus flaccus Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 255
closeness to the gods, of julius caesar and romulus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 139
cures Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 255
deification, ascent to heavens Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 139
dionysius of halicarnassus Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 255
divine support, by mars Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 139
divine support Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 139
doubt Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 139
epiphany, of romulus-quirinus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 139
festivals, poplifugia Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 139
genius, genii Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 255
genius Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 139
iulius proclus Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 255
livy Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 50
m. liuius salinator Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 255
mars Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 139
mary magdalene Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 50
messiah Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 49
numa Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 50
octauian (see augustus) Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 255
offerings, poems as offerings, sacred gifts (sacra), honos, honorem, cantibus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 139
offerings, sacrificial offerings, victims, hostia Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 139
plutarch Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 50
power Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 49
priests, priesthoods, flamen quirinalis Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 255
proculus Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 50
quirinus Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 255; Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 50
rationalising Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 139
resurrection Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 49
revelation Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 50
romulus, deified, quirinus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 139
romulus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 139; Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 49, 50
rumour Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 139
scepticism Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 139
temple Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 50
transferal' Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 49