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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4527
Dionysius Of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 1.85.6


nanThey did not both favour the same site for the building of the city; for Romulus proposed to settle the Palatine hill, among other reasons, because of the good fortune of the place where they had been preserved and brought up, whereas Remus favoured the place that is now named after him Remoria. And indeed this place is very suitable for a city, being a hill not far from the Tiber and about thirty stades from Rome. From this rivalry their unsociable love of rule immediately began to disclose itself; for on the one who now yielded the victor would inevitably impose his will on all occasions alike. <


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Cicero, Republic, 2.58 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.58. Nam cum esset ex aere alieno commota civitas, plebs montem sacrum prius, deinde Aventinum occupavit. Ac ne Lycurgi quidem disciplina tenuit illos in hominibus Graecis frenos; nam etiam Spartae regte Theopompo sunt item quinque, quos illi ephoros appellant, in Creta autem decem, qui cosmoe vocantur, ut contra consulare imperium tribuni pl., sic illi contra vim regiam constituti.
2. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 1.87.3 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)

1.87.3.  Remus having been slain in this action, Romulus, who had gained a most melancholy victory through the death of his brother and the mutual slaughter of citizens, buried Remus at Remoria, since when alive he had clung to it as the site for the new city. As for himself, in his grief and repentance for what had happened, he became dejected and lost all desire for life. But when Laurentia, who had received the babes when newly born and brought them up and loved them no less than a mother, entreated and comforted him, he listened to her and rose up, and gathering together the Latins who had not been slain in the battle (they were now little more than three thousand out of a very great multitude at first, when he led out the colony), he built a city on the Palatine hill.
3. Livy, History, 1.6.4, 27.25.7 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)

4. Propertius, Elegies, 2.31.3-2.31.8, 2.31.12-2.31.16 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)

5. Sallust, Iugurtha, 31.17 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Juvenal, Satires, 3.84-3.85 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Plutarch, Romulus, 9.4, 11.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.4. But when they set out to establish their city, a dispute at once arose concerning the site. Romulus, accordingly, built Roma Quadrata (which means square ),and wished to have the city on that site; but Remus laid out a strong precinct on the Aventine hill, which was named from him Remonium, but now is called Rignarium. 11.1. Romulus buried Remus, together with his foster-fathers, in the Remonia, See chapter ix. 4. and then set himself to building his city, after summoning from Tuscany men who prescribed all the details in accordance with certain sacred ordices and writings, and taught them to him as in a religious rite. A circular trench was dug around what is now the Comitium, A space adjoining the forum where the people met in assembly. The mundus, or augural centre of the city, was really on thePalatine. and in this were deposited first-fruits of all things the use of which was sanctioned by custom as good and by nature as necessary; and finally, every man brought a small portion of the soil of his native land, and these were cast in among the first-fruits and mingled with them.
8. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 11.2.20-11.2.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11.2.20.  These symbols are then arranged as follows. The first thought is placed, as it were, in the forecourt; the second, let us say, in the living-room; the remainder are placed in due order all round the impluvium and entrusted not merely to bedrooms and parlours, but even to the care of statues and the like. This done, as soon as the memory of the facts requires to be revived, all these places are visited in turn and the various deposits are demanded from their custodians, as the sight of each recalls the respective details. Consequently, however large the number of these which it is required to remember, all are linked one to the other like dancers hand in hand, and there can be no mistake since they what precedes to what follows, no trouble being required except the preliminary labour of committing the various points to memory. 11.2.21.  What I have spoken of as being done in a house, can equally well be done in connexion with public buildings, a long journey, the ramparts of a city, or even pictures. Or we may even imagine such places to ourselves. We require, therefore, places, real or imaginary, and images or symbols, which we must, of course, invent for ourselves. By images I mean the words by which we distinguish the things which we have to learn by heart: in fact, as Cicero says, we use "places like wax tablets and symbols in lieu of letters.
9. Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria, 11.2.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11.2.21.  What I have spoken of as being done in a house, can equally well be done in connexion with public buildings, a long journey, the ramparts of a city, or even pictures. Or we may even imagine such places to ourselves. We require, therefore, places, real or imaginary, and images or symbols, which we must, of course, invent for ourselves. By images I mean the words by which we distinguish the things which we have to learn by heart: in fact, as Cicero says, we use "places like wax tablets and symbols in lieu of letters.
10. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 1.1.8



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
altar of hercules (ara maxima) Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
apollo,portico of Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
apollo,temple of Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
appian way Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
ara maxima (altar of hercules) Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
aventine hill Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
bergmann,b. Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 26
bounia,a. Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 26
capitol,potency of Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
carey,s. Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 26
cattle in rome Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
cynthia (in propertius) Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
diana Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
gardens Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
gens,julia Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 26
heroön Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 167
hills of rome Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
hölscher,t. Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 26
immigration Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
isager,j. Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 26
jupiter feretrius,temple of Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
maecenas,and propertius Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
maecenas,literary patronage Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
martial Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 26
miles,m. Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 26
murphy,t. Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 26
new gardens Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
ornamenta,östenberg,i. Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 26
palatine hill,aristocratic character Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
palestrina Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 26
patronage,of literature Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
petronius Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 26
pietas Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 167
pliny the elder Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 26
pompey,portico of Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
portico of apollo Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
portico of pompey Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
remus Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120; Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 167
romanus' Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
rome,casa romuli Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 167
rome,casa romuli on Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 167
rome,comitium Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 167
rome,forum romanum Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 167
rome,palatine hill,casa romuli on Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 167
rome,pomerium Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 167
rome,remuria Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 167
rome,remus buried on Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 167
rome,temple of concordia Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 26
rome,temple of divus augustus,victoria in Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 26
romulus,his tomb Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 167
romulus Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120; Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 167
temple of,apollo Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
temple of,diana Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
temple of jupiter feretrius Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
topography of rome,from propertius Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
tullius cicero,m.,as collector Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 26
umbricius (juvenal) Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120
verres,c.,cicero prosecutes Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 26
vertumnus Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 120