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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4527
Dionysius Of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 1.34.3


nan As for the name of the hill, some think it was an ancient name, as I have said, and that consequently the Epeans were especially pleased with the hill through memory of the hill of Cronus in Elis. This is in the territory of Pisa, near the river Alpheus, and the Eleans, regarding it as sacred to Cronus, assemble together at stated times to honour it with sacrifices and other marks of reverence. <


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 5.17, 6.64 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Varro, On The Latin Language, 5.41-5.42 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 20.14.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

20.14.6.  There was in their city a bronze image of Cronus, extending its hands, palms up and sloping toward the ground, so that each of the children when placed thereon rolled down and fell into a sort of gaping pit filled with fire. It is probable that it was from this that Euripides has drawn the mythical story found in his works about the sacrifice in Tauris, in which he presents Iphigeneia being asked by Orestes: But what tomb shall receive me when I die? A sacred fire within, and earth's broad rift.
4. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 1.34.1, 1.34.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.34.1.  A few years after the Arcadians another Greek expedition came into Italy under the command of Hercules, who had just returned from the conquest of Spain and of all the region that extends to the setting of the sun. It was some of his followers who, begging Hercules to dismiss them from the expedition, remained in this region and built a town on a suitable hill, which they found at a distance of about three stades from Pallantium. This is now called theCapitoline hill, but by the men of that time the Saturnian hill, or, in Greek, the hill of Cronus.
5. Livy, History, 1.16.1-1.16.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Herodian, History of The Empire After Marcus, 1.16.1-1.16.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 5.21.2, 6.20.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.21.2. As you go to the stadium along the road from the Metroum, there is on the left at the bottom of Mount Cronius a platform of stone, right by the very mountain, with steps through it. By the platform have been set up bronze images of Zeus. These have been made from the fines inflicted on athletes who have wantonly broken the rules of the contests, and they are called Zanes (figures of Zeus) by the natives. 6.20.1. Mount Cronius, as I have already said, extends parallel to the terrace with the treasuries on it. On the summit of the mountain the Basilae, as they are called, sacrifice to Cronus at the spring equinox, in the month called Elaphius among the Eleans.
8. Tertullian, Apology, 9.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

9. Porphyry, On Abstinence, 2.27 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

2.27. 27.For at first, indeed, sacrifices of fruits were made to the Gods; but, in the course of time, men becoming negligent of sanctity, in consequence of fruits being scarce, and through the want of legitimate nutriment, being impelled to eat each other, then supplicating divinity with many prayers, they first began to make oblations of themselves to |60 the Gods, not only consecrating to the divinities whatever among their possessions was most beautiful, but, proceeding beyond this, they sacrificed those of their own species. Hence, even to the present time, not only in Arcadia, in the Lupercal festivals, and in Carthage, men are sacrificed in common to Saturn, but periodically, also, for the sake of remembering the legal institute, they sprinkle the altars of those of the same tribe with blood, although the rites of their sacrifices exclude, by the voice of the crier, him from engaging in them who is accused of human slaughter. Proceeding therefore from hence, they made the bodies of other animals supply the place of their own in sacrifices, and again, through a satiety of legitimate nutriment, becoming oblivious of piety, they were induced by voracity to leave nothing untasted, nothing un-devoured. And this is what now happens to all men with respect to the aliment from fruits. For when, by the assumption of them, they have alleviated their necessary indigence, then searching for a superfluity of satiety, they labour to procure many things for food which are placed beyond the limits of temperance. Hence, as if they had made no ignoble sacrifices to the Gods, they proceeded also to taste the animals which they immolated; and from this, as a principle of the deed, the eating of animals became an addition to men to the nutriment derived from fruits. As, therefore, antiquity offered the first produce of fruits to the Gods, and gladly, after their pious sacrifice, tasted what they offered, thus also, when they sacrificed the firstlings of animals to the divinities, they thought that the same thing ought to be done by them, though ancient piety did not ordain these particulars after this manner, but venerated each of the Gods from fruits. For with such oblations, both nature, and every sense of the human soul, are delighted. No altar then was wet with blood of bulls Irrationally slain; but this was thought To be of every impious deed the worst, Limbs to devour of brutes deprived of life. SPAN


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeneas Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 126
arcadia, arcadian Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 126
athens Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 84
augustus Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 126
baal hammon Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 84
basilai Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 84; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
basileia Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
carthage Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 84; Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 126
cassius dio Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 126
cedranus Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 126
cosmos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
crete Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 84; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
dactyls Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
dionysius of halicarnassus Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 126
endymion Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
games, olympic Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
herakles Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
himera Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 84
ianus Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 126
iuppiter Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 126
klymenos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
kouretes Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 84; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
kronia Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 84
kronion, mount Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
kronos, and human sacrifice Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 84
kronos, and rhea Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 84
kronos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
lebadeia Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 84
leontini Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 84
macrobius Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 126
olympia Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 84; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
olympus Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
pelops Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
power, royal/sovereign Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
priests Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
protarchus of tralles Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 126
rhea Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
rhodes Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 84
rites, sacrificium Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 126
rites, saturnalia Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 126
roman topography, mons capitolinus Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 126
royalty Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
sacrifices Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
saturn Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
saturnus Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 126
seruius tullius Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 126
sovereignty, myth of Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
sovereignty Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
spring Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
temples, shrines, and altars, of saturnus (forum romanum) Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 126
temples, shrines, and altars, of saturnus (mons capitolinus) Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 126
titans' Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 84
titans Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
uirgil Buszard, Greek Translations of Roman Gods (2023) 126
zeus, child Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157
zeus, olympios Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 157