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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4479
Diogenes Laertius, Lives Of The Philosophers, 7.135-7.140


nanBody is defined by Apollodorus in his Physics as that which is extended in three dimensions, length, breadth, and depth. This is also called solid body. But surface is the extremity of a solid body, or that which has length and breadth only without depth. That surface exists not only in our thought but also in reality is maintained by Posidonius in the third book of his Celestial Phenomena. A line is the extremity of a surface or length without breadth, or that which has length alone. A point is the extremity of a line, the smallest possible mark or dot.God is one and the same with Reason, Fate, and Zeus; he is also called by many other names.


nanIn the beginning he was by himself; he transformed the whole of substance through air into water, and just as in animal generation the seed has a moist vehicle, so in cosmic moisture God, who is the seminal reason of the universe, remains behind in the moisture as such an agent, adapting matter to himself with a view to the next stage of creation. Thereupon he created first of all the four elements, fire, water, air, earth. They are discussed by Zeno in his treatise On the Whole, by Chrysippus in the first book of his Physics, and by Archedemus in a work On Elements. An element is defined as that from which particular things first come to be at their birth and into which they are finally resolved.


nanThe four elements together constitute unqualified substance or matter. Fire is the hot element, water the moist, air the cold, earth the dry. Not but what the quality of dryness is also found in the air. Fire has the uppermost place; it is also called aether, and in it the sphere of the fixed stars is first created; then comes the sphere of the planets, next to that the air, then the water, and lowest of all the earth, which is at the centre of all things.The term universe or cosmos is used by them in three senses: (1) of God himself, the individual being whose quality is derived from the whole of substance; he is indestructible and ingenerable, being the artificer of this orderly arrangement, who at stated periods of time absorbs into himself the whole of substance and again creates it from himself. (2)


nanAgain, they give the name of cosmos to the orderly arrangement of the heavenly bodies in itself as such; and (3) in the third place to that whole of which these two are parts. Again, the cosmos is defined as the individual being qualifying the whole of substance, or, in the words of Posidonius in his elementary treatise on Celestial Phenomena, a system made up of heaven and earth and the natures in them, or, again, as a system constituted by gods and men and all things created for their sake. By heaven is meant the extreme circumference or ring in which the deity has his seat.The world, in their view, is ordered by reason and providence: so says Chrysippus in the fifth book of his treatise On Providence and Posidonius in his work On the Gods, book iii. – inasmuch as reason pervades every part of it, just as does the soul in us. Only there is a difference of degree; in some parts there is more of it, in others less.


nanFor through some parts it passes as a hold or containing force, as is the case with our bones and sinews; while through others it passes as intelligence, as in the ruling part of the soul. Thus, then, the whole world is a living being, endowed with soul and reason, and having aether for its ruling principle: so says Antipater of Tyre in the eighth book of his treatise On the Cosmos. Chrysippus in the first book of his work On Providence and Posidonius in his book On the Gods say that the heaven, but Cleanthes that the sun, is the ruling power of the world. Chrysippus, however, in the course of the same work gives a somewhat different account, namely, that it is the purer part of the aether; the same which they declare to be preeminently God and always to have, as it were in sensible fashion, pervaded all that is in the air, all animals and plants, and also the earth itself, as a principle of cohesion.


nanThe world, they say, is one and finite, having a spherical shape, such a shape being the most suitable for motion, as Posidonius says in the fifth book of his Physical Discourse and the disciples of Antipater in their works on the Cosmos. Outside of the world is diffused the infinite void, which is incorporeal. By incorporeal is meant that which, though capable of being occupied by body, is not so occupied. The world has no empty space within it, but forms one united whole. This is a necessary result of the sympathy and tension which binds together things in heaven and earth. Chrysippus discusses the void in his work On Void and in the first book of his Physical Sciences; so too Apollophanes in his Physics, Apollodorus, and Posidonius in his Physical Discourse, book ii. But these, it is added [i.e. sympathy and tension], are likewise bodies.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

21 results
1. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.36-1.39 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.36. Lastly, Balbus, I come to your Stoic school. Zeno's view is that the law of nature is divine, and that its function is to command what is right and to forbid the opposite. How he makes out this law to be alive passes our comprehension; yet we undoubtedly expect god to be a living being. In another passage however Zeno declares that the aether is god — if there is any meaning in a god without sensation, a form of deity that never presents itself to us when we offer up our prayers and supplications and make our vows. And in other books again he holds the view that a 'reason' which pervades all nature is possessed of divine power. He likewise attributes the same powers to the stars, or at another time to the years, the months and the seasons. Again, in his interpretation of Hesiod's Theogony (or Origin of the Gods) he does away with the customary and received ideas of the gods altogether, for he does not reckon either Jupiter, Juno or Vesta as gods, or any being that bears a personal name, but teaches that these names have been assigned allegorically to dumb and lifeless things. 1.37. Zeno's pupil Aristo holds equally mistaken views. He thinks that the form of the deity cannot be comprehended, and he denies the gods sensation, and in fact is uncertain whether god is a living being at all. Cleanthes, who attended Zeno's lectures at the same time as the last-named, at one moment says that the world itself is god, at another gives this name to the mind and soul of the universe, and at another decides that the most unquestionable deity is that remote all‑surrounding fiery atmosphere called the aether, which encircles and embraces the universe on its outer side at an exceedingly lofty altitude; while in the books that he wrote to combat hedonism he babbles like one demented, now imagining gods of some definite shape and form, now assigning full divinity to the stars, now pronouncing that nothing is more divine than reason. The result is that the god whom we apprehend by our intelligence, and desire to make to correspond with a mental concept as a seal tallies with its impression, has utterly and entirely vanished. 1.38. Persaeus, another pupil of Zeno, says that men have deified those persons who have made some discovery of special utility for civilization, and that useful and health-giving things have themselves been called by divine names; he did not even say that they were discoveries of the gods, but speaks of them as actually divine. But what could be more ridiculous than to award divine honours to things mean and ugly, or to give the rank of gods to men now dead and gone, whose worship could only take the form of lamentation? 1.39. Chrysippus, who is deemed to be the most skilful interpreter of the Stoic dreams, musters an enormous mob of unknown gods — so utterly unknown that even imagination cannot guess at their form and nature, although our mind appears capable of visualizing anything; for he says that divine power resides in reason, and in the soul and mind of the universe; he calls the world itself a god, and also the all‑pervading world-soul, and again the guiding principle of that soul, which operates in the intellect and reason, and the common and all‑embracing nature of things; beside this, the fire that I previously termed aether; and also the power of Fate, and the Necessity that governs future events; and also all fluid and soluble substances, such as water, earth, air, the sun, moon and stars, and the all‑embracing unity of things; and even those human beings who have attained immortality.
2. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 1.79 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.79. Bene reprehendis, et se isto modo res habet. credamus igitur igitur etiam K Panaetio a Platone suo dissentienti? quem enim omnibus locis divinum, quem sapientissimum, quem sanctissimum, quem Homerum philosophorum appellat, huius hanc unam sententiam de inmortalitate animorum non probat. volt enim, quod nemo negat, quicquid natum sit interire; nasci autem animos, quod declaret eorum similitudo qui procreentur, quae etiam in ingeniis, non solum in corporibus appareat. alteram autem adfert affert hic X rationem, nihil esse quod doleat, quin id aegrum esse quoque possit; quod autem in morbum cadat, id etiam interiturum; dolere dolore V 1 autem animos, ergo etiam interire.
3. Cornutus, De Natura Deorum, 9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4. New Testament, John, 1.4, 4.24, 5.26 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.4. In him was life, and the life was the light of men. 4.24. God is spirit, and those who worship him must worship in spirit and truth. 5.26. For as the Father has life in himself, even so he gave to the Son also to have life in himself.
5. Plutarch, On Stoic Self-Contradictions, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Plutarch, Placita Philosophorum (874D-911C), 1.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Alcinous, Handbook of Platonism, 8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Galen, On The Doctrines of Hippocrates And Plato, 2.5.9-2.5.13 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

9. Numenius of Apamea, Fragments, 17, 15 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Numenius of Apamea, Fragments, 17, 15 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.41-7.42, 7.134, 7.136-7.140, 7.142-7.144, 7.147-7.157 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.41. Diogenes of Ptolemas, it is true, begins with Ethics; but Apollodorus puts Ethics second, while Panaetius and Posidonius begin with Physics, as stated by Phanias, the pupil of Posidonius, in the first book of his Lectures of Posidonius. Cleanthes makes not three, but six parts, Dialectic, Rhetoric, Ethics, Politics, Physics, Theology. But others say that these are divisions not of philosophic exposition, but of philosophy itself: so, for instance, Zeno of Tarsus. Some divide the logical part of the system into the two sciences of rhetoric and dialectic; while some would add that which deals with definitions and another part concerning canons or criteria: some, however, dispense with the part about definitions. 7.42. Now the part which deals with canons or criteria they admit as a means for the discovery of truth, since in the course of it they explain the different kinds of perceptions that we have. And similarly the part about definitions is accepted as a means of recognizing truth, inasmuch as things are apprehended by means of general notions. Further, by rhetoric they understand the science of speaking well on matters set forth by plain narrative, and by dialectic that of correctly discussing subjects by question and answer; hence their alternative definition of it as the science of statements true, false, and neither true nor false.Rhetoric itself, they say, has three divisions: deliberative, forensic, and panegyric. 7.134. They hold that there are two principles in the universe, the active principle and the passive. The passive principle, then, is a substance without quality, i.e. matter, whereas the active is the reason inherent in this substance, that is God. For he is everlasting and is the artificer of each several thing throughout the whole extent of matter. This doctrine is laid down by Zeno of Citium in his treatise On Existence, Cleanthes in his work On Atoms, Chrysippus in the first book of his Physics towards the end, Archedemus in his treatise On Elements, and Posidonius in the second book of his Physical Exposition. There is a difference, according to them, between principles and elements; the former being without generation or destruction, whereas the elements are destroyed when all things are resolved into fire. Moreover, the principles are incorporeal and destitute of form, while the elements have been endowed with form. 7.136. In the beginning he was by himself; he transformed the whole of substance through air into water, and just as in animal generation the seed has a moist vehicle, so in cosmic moisture God, who is the seminal reason of the universe, remains behind in the moisture as such an agent, adapting matter to himself with a view to the next stage of creation. Thereupon he created first of all the four elements, fire, water, air, earth. They are discussed by Zeno in his treatise On the Whole, by Chrysippus in the first book of his Physics, and by Archedemus in a work On Elements. An element is defined as that from which particular things first come to be at their birth and into which they are finally resolved. 7.137. The four elements together constitute unqualified substance or matter. Fire is the hot element, water the moist, air the cold, earth the dry. Not but what the quality of dryness is also found in the air. Fire has the uppermost place; it is also called aether, and in it the sphere of the fixed stars is first created; then comes the sphere of the planets, next to that the air, then the water, and lowest of all the earth, which is at the centre of all things.The term universe or cosmos is used by them in three senses: (1) of God himself, the individual being whose quality is derived from the whole of substance; he is indestructible and ingenerable, being the artificer of this orderly arrangement, who at stated periods of time absorbs into himself the whole of substance and again creates it from himself. (2) 7.138. Again, they give the name of cosmos to the orderly arrangement of the heavenly bodies in itself as such; and (3) in the third place to that whole of which these two are parts. Again, the cosmos is defined as the individual being qualifying the whole of substance, or, in the words of Posidonius in his elementary treatise on Celestial Phenomena, a system made up of heaven and earth and the natures in them, or, again, as a system constituted by gods and men and all things created for their sake. By heaven is meant the extreme circumference or ring in which the deity has his seat.The world, in their view, is ordered by reason and providence: so says Chrysippus in the fifth book of his treatise On Providence and Posidonius in his work On the Gods, book iii. – inasmuch as reason pervades every part of it, just as does the soul in us. Only there is a difference of degree; in some parts there is more of it, in others less. 7.139. For through some parts it passes as a hold or containing force, as is the case with our bones and sinews; while through others it passes as intelligence, as in the ruling part of the soul. Thus, then, the whole world is a living being, endowed with soul and reason, and having aether for its ruling principle: so says Antipater of Tyre in the eighth book of his treatise On the Cosmos. Chrysippus in the first book of his work On Providence and Posidonius in his book On the Gods say that the heaven, but Cleanthes that the sun, is the ruling power of the world. Chrysippus, however, in the course of the same work gives a somewhat different account, namely, that it is the purer part of the aether; the same which they declare to be preeminently God and always to have, as it were in sensible fashion, pervaded all that is in the air, all animals and plants, and also the earth itself, as a principle of cohesion. 7.140. The world, they say, is one and finite, having a spherical shape, such a shape being the most suitable for motion, as Posidonius says in the fifth book of his Physical Discourse and the disciples of Antipater in their works on the Cosmos. Outside of the world is diffused the infinite void, which is incorporeal. By incorporeal is meant that which, though capable of being occupied by body, is not so occupied. The world has no empty space within it, but forms one united whole. This is a necessary result of the sympathy and tension which binds together things in heaven and earth. Chrysippus discusses the void in his work On Void and in the first book of his Physical Sciences; so too Apollophanes in his Physics, Apollodorus, and Posidonius in his Physical Discourse, book ii. But these, it is added [i.e. sympathy and tension], are likewise bodies. 7.142. The world, they hold, comes into being when its substance has first been converted from fire through air into moisture and then the coarser part of the moisture has condensed as earth, while that whose particles are fine has been turned into air, and this process of rarefaction goes on increasing till it generates fire. Thereupon out of these elements animals and plants and all other natural kinds are formed by their mixture. The generation and the destruction of the world are discussed by Zeno in his treatise On the Whole, by Chrysippus in the first book of his Physics, by Posidonius in the first book of his work On the Cosmos, by Cleanthes, and by Antipater in his tenth book On the Cosmos. Panaetius, however, maintained that the world is indestructible.The doctrine that the world is a living being, rational, animate and intelligent, is laid down by Chrysippus in the first book of his treatise On Providence, by Apollodorus in his Physics, and by Posidonius. 7.143. It is a living thing in the sense of an animate substance endowed with sensation; for animal is better than non-animal, and nothing is better than the world, ergo the world is a living being. And it is endowed with soul, as is clear from our several souls being each a fragment of it. Boethus, however, denies that the world is a living thing. The unity of the world is maintained by Zeno in his treatise On the Whole, by Chrysippus, by Apollodorus in his Physics, and by Posidonius in the first book of his Physical Discourse. By the totality of things, the All, is meant, according to Apollodorus, (1) the world, and in another sense (2) the system composed of the world and the void outside it. The world then is finite, the void infinite. 7.144. of the stars some are fixed, and are carried round with the whole heaven; others, the wandering stars or planets, have their special motions. The sun travels in an oblique path through the zodiac. Similarly the moon travels in a spiral path. The sun is pure fire: so Posidonius in the seventh book of his Celestial Phenomena. And it is larger than the earth, as the same author says in the sixth book of his Physical Discourse. Moreover it is spherical in shape like the world itself according to this same author and his school. That it is fire is proved by its producing all the effects of fire; that it is larger than the earth by the fact that all the earth is illuminated by it; nay more, the heaven beside. The fact too that the earth casts a conical shadow proves that the sun is greater than it. And it is because of its great size that it is seen from every part of the earth. 7.147. The deity, say they, is a living being, immortal, rational, perfect or intelligent in happiness, admitting nothing evil, taking providential care of the world and all that therein is, but he is not of human shape. He is, however, the artificer of the universe and, as it were, the father of all, both in general and in that particular part of him which is all-pervading, and which is called many names according to its various powers. They give the name Dia (Δία) because all things are due to (διά) him; Zeus (Ζῆνα) in so far as he is the cause of life (ζῆν) or pervades all life; the name Athena is given, because the ruling part of the divinity extends to the aether; the name Hera marks its extension to the air; he is called Hephaestus since it spreads to the creative fire; Poseidon, since it stretches to the sea; Demeter, since it reaches to the earth. Similarly men have given the deity his other titles, fastening, as best they can, on some one or other of his peculiar attributes. 7.148. The substance of God is declared by Zeno to be the whole world and the heaven, as well as by Chrysippus in his first book of the Gods, and by Posidonius in his first book with the same title. Again, Antipater in the seventh book of his work On the Cosmos says that the substance of God is akin to air, while Boethus in his work On Nature speaks of the sphere of the fixed stars as the substance of God. Now the term Nature is used by them to mean sometimes that which holds the world together, sometimes that which causes terrestrial things to spring up. Nature is defined as a force moving of itself, producing and preserving in being its offspring in accordance with seminal principles within definite periods, and effecting results homogeneous with their sources. 7.149. Nature, they hold, aims both at utility and at pleasure, as is clear from the analogy of human craftsmanship. That all things happen by fate or destiny is maintained by Chrysippus in his treatise De fato, by Posidonius in his De fato, book ii., by Zeno and by Boethus in his De fato, book i. Fate is defined as an endless chain of causation, whereby things are, or as the reason or formula by which the world goes on. What is more, they say that divination in all its forms is a real and substantial fact, if there is really Providence. And they prove it to be actually a science on the evidence of certain results: so Zeno, Chrysippus in the second book of his De divinatione, Athenodorus, and Posidonius in the second book of his Physical Discourse and the fifth book of his De divinatione. But Panaetius denies that divination has any real existence. 7.150. The primary matter they make the substratum of all things: so Chrysippus in the first book of his Physics, and Zeno. By matter is meant that out of which anything whatsoever is produced. Both substance and matter are terms used in a twofold sense according as they signify (1) universal or (2) particular substance or matter. The former neither increases nor diminishes, while the matter of particular things both increases and diminishes. Body according to them is substance which is finite: so Antipater in his second book On Substance, and Apollodorus in his Physics. Matter can also be acted upon, as the same author says, for if it were immutable, the things which are produced would never have been produced out of it. Hence the further doctrine that matter is divisible ad infinitum. Chrysippus says that the division is not ad infinitum, but itself infinite; for there is nothing infinitely small to which the division can extend. But nevertheless the division goes on without ceasing. 7.151. Hence, again, their explanation of the mixture of two substances is, according to Chrysippus in the third book of his Physics, that they permeate each other through and through, and that the particles of the one do not merely surround those of the other or lie beside them. Thus, if a little drop of wine be thrown into the sea, it will be equally diffused over the whole sea for a while and then will be blended with it.Also they hold that there are daemons (δαίμονες) who are in sympathy with mankind and watch over human affairs. They believe too in heroes, that is, the souls of the righteous that have survived their bodies.of the changes which go on in the air, they describe winter as the cooling of the air above the earth due to the sun's departure to a distance from the earth; spring as the right temperature of the air consequent upon his approach to us; 7.152. ummer as the heating of the air above the earth when he travels to the north; while autumn they attribute to the receding of the sun from us. As for the winds, they are streams of air, differently named according to the localities from which they blow. And the cause of their production is the sun through the evaporation of the clouds. The rainbow is explained as the reflection of the sun's rays from watery clouds or, as Posidonius says in his Meteorology, an image of a segment of the sun or moon in a cloud suffused with dew, which is hollow and visible without intermission, the image showing itself as if in a mirror in the form of a circular arch. Comets, bearded stars, and meteors are fires which arise when dense air is carried up to the region of aether. 7.153. A shooting star is the sudden kindling of a mass of fire in rapid motion through the air, which leaves a trail behind it presenting an appearance of length. Rain is the transformation of cloud into water, when moisture drawn up by the sun from land or sea has been only partially evaporated. If this is cooled down, it is called hoar-frost. Hail is frozen cloud, crumbled by a wind; while snow is moist matter from a cloud which has congealed: so Posidonius in the eighth book of his Physical Discourse. Lightning is a kindling of clouds from being rubbed together or being rent by wind, as Zeno says in his treatise On the Whole; thunder the noise these clouds make when they rub against each other or burst. 7.154. Thunderbolt is the term used when the fire is violently kindled and hurled to the ground with great force as the clouds grind against each other or are torn by the wind. Others say that it is a compression of fiery air descending with great force. A typhoon is a great and violent thunderstorm whirlwind-like, or a whirlwind of smoke from a cloud that has burst. A prester is a cloud rent all round by the force of fire and wind. Earthquakes, say they, happen when the wind finds its way into, or is imprisoned in, the hollow parts of the earth: so Posidonius in his eighth book; and some of them are tremblings, others openings of the earth, others again lateral displacements, and yet others vertical displacements. 7.155. They maintain that the parts of the world are arranged thus. The earth is in the middle answering to a centre; next comes the water, which is shaped like a sphere all round it, concentric with the earth, so that the earth is in water. After the water comes a spherical layer of air. There are five celestial circles: first, the arctic circle, which is always visible; second, the summer tropic; third, the circle of the equinox; fourth, the winter tropic; and fifth, the antarctic, which is invisible to us. They are called parallel, because they do not incline towards one another; yet they are described round the same centre. The zodiac is an oblique circle, as it crosses the parallel circles. 7.156. And there are five terrestrial zones: first, the northern zone which is beyond the arctic circle, uninhabitable because of the cold; second, a temperate zone; a third, uninhabitable because of great heats, called the torrid zone; fourth, a counter-temperate zone; fifth, the southern zone, uninhabitable because of its cold.Nature in their view is an artistically working fire, going on its way to create; which is equivalent to a fiery, creative, or fashioning breath. And the soul is a nature capable of perception. And they regard it as the breath of life, congenital with us; from which they infer first that it is a body and secondly that it survives death. Yet it is perishable, though the soul of the universe, of which the individual souls of animals are parts, is indestructible. 7.157. Zeno of Citium and Antipater, in their treatises De anima, and Posidonius define the soul as a warm breath; for by this we become animate and this enables us to move. Cleanthes indeed holds that all souls continue to exist until the general conflagration; but Chrysippus says that only the souls of the wise do so.They count eight parts of the soul: the five senses, the generative power in us, our power of speech, and that of reasoning. They hold that we see when the light between the visual organ and the object stretches in the form of a cone: so Chrysippus in the second book of his Physics and Apollodorus. The apex of the cone in the air is at the eye, the base at the object seen. Thus the thing seen is reported to us by the medium of the air stretching out towards it, as if by a stick.
12. Eusebius of Caesarea, Demonstration of The Gospel, 3.3-3.8 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

13. Eusebius of Caesarea, Preparation For The Gospel, 15.14.2 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

14. Nag Hammadi, Allogenes, 49.26 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

15. Plotinus, Enneads, 4.7.4 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

16. Victorinus, Adversus Arium, 1.50.10-1.50.21 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

17. Proclus, Institutio Theologica, 103 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

18. Anon., Letter of Aristeas, 129-141, 16, 128

128. It is worth while to mention briefly the information which he gave in reply to our questions. For I suppose that most people feel a curiosity with regard to some of the enactments in the law
19. Anon., Chaldean Oracles, 16, 20-21, 3, 37, 4-5, 50, 6, 8, 1

20. Long And Sedley, The Hellenistic Philosophers, None

21. Stoic School, Stoicor. Veter. Fragm., 1.102, 1.518, 2.580, 2.790, 2.1009, 2.1027



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
(hēgemonikon) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
(lekta) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
(zēloun, zēlōtos), of god (imitatio dei) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
action, theory of Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239
agriculture / plants Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
alcinous Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 149
alexandria Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 152
animals (general) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
antipater, on beginning of the cosmos Marmodoro and Prince, Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity (2015) 13
archedemus, on elements Marmodoro and Prince, Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity (2015) 13
aristeas Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 152
aristotle, on cosmology Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 266
aristotle Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 59
ascent literature, visionary/mystical Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377, 386
assent Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 116; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239
assent (sunkatathesis) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
augustine Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377
becker, lawrence Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 224
body / bodies (corporeal, material, matter, physical) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 402, 411
causation, cause Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239
cause (aitia, aition), active Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 329
chevallier, r. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 174
choice (hairesis) / choosing (haireisthai) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
christ, incarnation of McDonough, Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine (2009) 110
christ Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 149
chrysippus Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 114; Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 402; Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 149
cicero Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 224
cleanthes Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 114; Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 402
cleanthes of assos Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 152
clement of alexandria Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377, 386
cognitive / cognition Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 402
compared to cleanthes and zeno, on beginning of cosmos Marmodoro and Prince, Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity (2015) 13
compared to cleanthes and zeno, on elements Marmodoro and Prince, Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity (2015) 13
confidence, conflagration Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 224
conflagration Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 114, 136
connections within, in greek thought McDonough, Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine (2009) 110
contemplation Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377, 386
cosmic conflagration Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 266
cosmic soul/world soul, proofs of cosmic soul Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 136
cosmos, beginning of Marmodoro and Prince, Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity (2015) 13
cosmos (visible world, universe) / cosmology Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 402, 411
crantor Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 186
creation / creatures / create Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 402
creation and ownership, hellenistic views McDonough, Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine (2009) 110
curriculum Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 149
deities Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 152
del lucchese, f. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 174
demiurge/craftsman Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 114
descartes, r. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 174
destiny / fate Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
determinism, dialectic Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239, 266
diogenes laertius Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411; Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 149
diogenes of babylon Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 114; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239
eleazer Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 152
elements, in creation of cosmos Marmodoro and Prince, Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity (2015) 13
emanation Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 174
emotions, modern theories Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 224
emotions / passions (pathē, pathēmata) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 402
ethics, etymology Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239
ethics Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 149
eusebius Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377, 386
eusebius of caesarea Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 149
example / model / pattern (exemplum, exemplar, paradeigma) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
existence, pre-existence Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377
fate Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 114, 136; McDonough, Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine (2009) 110
father/offspring argument Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 136
fear (phobos) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 402
feelings, as awareness of corporeal states Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 224
fire, as cosmic principle Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239, 266
fire, conflagration Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 224
fire, intelligent Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 386
fire Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 174; Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 114
form, and matter Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 329
form Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 174; Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 329; Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 186
gnostic, gnosticism Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377, 386
goal (telos) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
god, in greek thought McDonough, Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine (2009) 110
god, stoic Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 114, 116, 136
god Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377, 386; Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 329; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239; Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 149
god (theos) ix Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
gods / goddesses, zeus Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
good (moral) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
graeco-roman piety Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 59
gummere, r. m. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 174
harmony Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 186
harmony / symphony / orchestration Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
hebrews Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 149
heraclitus Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 266
high priest Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 152
hymn Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 152
hēgemonikon/central organ of soul, etc. Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 116
idea Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 174
incorporeal (immaterial) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 402
indivisible and divisible being Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 186
intellect, intelligence Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 114, 136
intellect, triad Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 386
intelligible, archetype, object Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 386
interentailment Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
johannine, christology Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377
knowledge Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239
language, stoic philosophy of Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239
law of nature/natural law, stoic politics Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 59
life, noetic Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377
life Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 152
limit Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 186
logic Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 149
logos Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239
mansfeld, j. Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 266
marius victorinus Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377
marzot, g. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 174
mathematicals Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 186
matter, as principle in stoic thought Marmodoro and Prince, Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity (2015) 13
matter, formless Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 329
matter, stoic Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 114, 116
matter Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 329; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 266; McDonough, Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine (2009) 110
matter and body Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 186
meaning, stoic theory of Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239
metaphysics Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 386; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239
middle platonism Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 386
mind, relation to body Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 224
mind, triad, nous Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377, 386
monad Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 386
monotheistic Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 152
nature/nature Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 59
nature Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377; Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 114, 116
nature (phusis) / natural, divine Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
neoplatonism Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 386
neopythagoreanism Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 386
nicomachus Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 386
nominalism Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 174
non-jew Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 152
non-rational Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
numenius Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 386
nussbaum, martha Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 224
one-being, platonic, plotinian Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377
one-being, triple-powered Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377
panaetius, on indestructibility of cosmos Marmodoro and Prince, Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity (2015) 13
panksepp, jaak Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 224
part of a whole (soul as, etc.) Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 136
parts of soul, stoic Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 116
perceptibles Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 186
perfect (teleios) / perfection (teleiōsis) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
physical elements Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 266
physics Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 402; Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 149
plato Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 266; Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 149
platonizing sethians Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377, 386
plotinus Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377, 386
pneuma Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 174; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239
pneuma (spirit, breath) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
pneuma (spiritus) Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 114, 116
poignault, r. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 174
porphyry Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377, 386
posidonius, on beginning of the cosmos Marmodoro and Prince, Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity (2015) 13
posidonius Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 224; Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 186
posidonius of apamea, on the soul Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 329
posidonius of apamea Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 329
principle (archē), active Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 329
principle (archē), passive Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 329
proclus Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377
providence Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 266
psychological structures Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239
quality Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377
quantity Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377
rationality/reason Jedan, Stoic Virtues: Chrysippus and the Religious Character of Stoic Ethics (2009) 13
reale, g. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 174
reason, rationality Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 114
reason (divine) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
reason (human) / rational faculty (logos, logistikon) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411
reproduction Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 136
rome Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239
scala naturae Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 116
scheme Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 149
seeds Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 174
seeds (seminal reasons) Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 136
seneca Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 174
sensation Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 116
soul, speech Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239
soul / mind (psuchē, animus) vii Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 402, 411
speusippus Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 186
spirit, god/one as Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377
spirit, tensile movement of Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377, 386
stoic, stoicism Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377, 386
stoic philosophers, on creation Marmodoro and Prince, Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity (2015) 13
stoicism, reactions to Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 224
stoicism, stoics, logic of Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239
stoicism, stoics, on language Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239
stoicism, stoics Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239
stoicism / stoic / stoa Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 402, 411
stoics, use of ζῷον λογικόν Dürr, Paul on the Human Vocation: Reason Language in Romans and Ancient Philosophical Tradition (2022) 40, 41
stoics McDonough, Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine (2009) 110
student v, vi Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 152
substance Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377
techne, teleology Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 266
tenor (hexis) Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 116
tension Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 116
theologia tripertita Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 149
theology Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 411; Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 149
thought Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239
tranquillity, truth Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 239
triad, chaldaean Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 386
triad Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 377
virtue / moral virtue (aretē) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 402, 411
zeno, on elements Marmodoro and Prince, Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity (2015) 13
zeno of citium Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 114, 136
zeus' McDonough, Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine (2009) 110
zeus, in stoic philosophy Marmodoro and Prince, Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity (2015) 13
zeus Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 152; Wilson, Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency (2022) 59
ζῷον λογικόν, corpus-assisted investigation of phrase Dürr, Paul on the Human Vocation: Reason Language in Romans and Ancient Philosophical Tradition (2022) 40, 41
ζῷον λογικόν, early stoic use of phrase Dürr, Paul on the Human Vocation: Reason Language in Romans and Ancient Philosophical Tradition (2022) 40, 41
ζῷον λογικόν, human beings as Dürr, Paul on the Human Vocation: Reason Language in Romans and Ancient Philosophical Tradition (2022) 40, 41