Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4479
Diogenes Laertius, Lives Of The Philosophers, 5.78-5.79


nanAnd in the official list the year in which he was archon was styled the year of lawlessness, according to this same Favorinus.Hermippus tells us that upon the death of Casander, being in fear of Antigonus, he fled to Ptolemy Soter. There he spent a considerable time and advised Ptolemy, among other things, to invest with sovereign power his children by Eurydice. To this Ptolemy would not agree, but bestowed the diadem on his son by Berenice, who, after Ptolemy's death, thought fit to detain Demetrius as a prisoner in the country until some decision should be taken concerning him. There he lived in great dejection, and somehow, in his sleep, received an asp-bite on the hand which proved fatal. He is buried in the district of Busiris near Diospolis.


nanHere are my lines upon him:A venomous asp was the death of the wise Demetrius, an asp withal of sticky venom, darting, not light from its eyes, but black death.Heraclides in his epitome of Sotion's Successions of Philosophers says that Ptolemy himself wished to transmit the kingdom to Philadelphus, but that Demetrius tried to dissuade him, saying, If you give it to another, you will not have it yourself. At the time when he was being continually attacked in Athens, Menander, the Comic poet, as I have also learnt, was very nearly brought to trial for no other cause than that he was a friend of Demetrius. However, Telesphorus, the nephew of Demetrius, begged him off.In the number of his works and their total length in lines he has surpassed almost all contemporary Peripatetics. For in learning and versatility he ha


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

19 results
1. Callimachus, Fragments, 392 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. Callimachus, Fragments, 392 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3. Callimachus, Fragments, 392 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4. Theocritus, Idylls, 17.128-17.134 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

5. Cicero, On The Ends of Good And Evil, 5.19.54, 5.53 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.53. Ac veteres quidem philosophi in beatorum insulis fingunt qualis futura futura Clericus ( ad Aeschinis Axioch. 17 ); natura sit vita sapientium, quos cura omni liberatos, nullum necessarium vitae cultum aut paratum aut apparatum Lamb. requirentis, nihil aliud esse esse om. BE acturos putant, nisi ut omne tempus inquirendo in qendo E in querendo RV inquerendo N ac discendo in naturae cognitione consumant. Nos autem non solum beatae vitae istam esse oblectationem videmus, sed etiam levamentum miseriarum. itaque multi, cum in in om. BER potestate essent hostium aut tyrannorum, multi in custodia, multi in exilio dolorem suum doctrinae studiis levaverunt. levarunt BE 5.53.  The old philosophers picture what the life of the Wise will be in the Islands of the Blest, and think that being released from all anxiety and needing none of the necessary equipment or accessories of life, they will do nothing but spend their whole time upon study and research in the science of nature. We on the other hand see in such studies not only the amusement of a life of happiness, but also the alleviation of misfortune; hence the numbers of men who when they had fallen into the power of enemies or tyrants, or when they were in prison or in exile, have solaced their sorrow with the pursuit of learning.
6. Cicero, On Duties, 5.19.54 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Polybius, Histories, 12.13.10-12.13.12 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

12.13.11.  He tells us that a snail moved by machinery went in front of his procession, spitting out saliva, and that donkeys were marched through the theatre, to show, forsooth, that the country had yielded up to others all the glory of Greece and obeyed the behests of Cassander. of all this he says he was in no wise ashamed. 12.13.12.  But yet neither Demetrius nor anyone else said anything of the sort about Demochares.
8. Plutarch, Precepts of Statecraft, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Plutarch, Sayings of Kings And Commanders, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Seneca The Younger, On Leisure, 9.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Theon Aelius, Exercises, 9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Aelian, Varia Historia, 3.17 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

13. Gellius, Attic Nights, 7.17.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Lucian, The Sky-Man, 16 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Such was the entertainment afforded me by royalty; private life was much more amusing; for I could make that out too. I saw Hermodorus the Epicurean perjuring himself for 40 pounds, Agathocles the Stoic suing a pupil for his fees, lawyer Clinias stealing a bowl from the temple of Asclepius, and Herophilus the cynic sleeping in a brothel. Not to mention the multitude of burglars, litigants, usurers, duns; oh, it was a fine representative show!Fr. I must say, Menippus, I should have liked the details here too; it all seems to have been very much to your taste.Me. I could not go through the whole of it, even to please you; to take it in with the eyes kept one busy. But the main divisions were very much what Homer gives from the shield of Achilles: here junketings and marriages, there courts and councils, in another compartment a sacrifice, and hard by a mourning. If I glanced at Getica, I would see the Getae at war; at Scythia, there were the Scythians wandering about on their waggons; half a turn in another direction gave me Egyptians at the plough, or Phoenicians chaffering, Cilician pirates, Spartan flagellants, Athenians at law.
15. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.7.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.7.1. This Ptolemy fell in love with Arsinoe, his full sister, and married her, violating herein Macedonian custom, but following that of his Egyptian subjects. Secondly he put to death his brother Argaeus, who was, it is said, plotting against him; and he it was who brought down from Memphis the corpse of Alexander. He put to death another brother also, son of Eurydice, on discovering that he was creating disaffection among the Cyprians. Then Magas, the half-brother of Ptolemy, who had been entrusted with the governorship of Cyrene by his mother Berenice—she had borne him to Philip, a Macedonians but of no note and of lowly origin—induced the people of Cyrene to revolt from Ptolemy and marched against Egypt .
16. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 1 (2nd cent. CE

17. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 2.111-2.112, 2.115, 2.120, 4.44, 5.75-5.76, 5.79-5.85, 6.99, 7.184, 9.43, 10.15 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2.111. There are also other pupils of Eubulides, amongst them Apollonius surnamed Cronus. He had a pupil Diodorus, the son of Ameinias of Iasus, who was also nicknamed Cronus. Callimachus in his Epigrams says of him:Momus himself chalked up on the walls Cronus is wise.He too was a dialectician and was supposed to have been the first who discovered the arguments known as the Veiled Figure and the Horned One. When he was staying with Ptolemy Soter, he had certain dialectical questions addressed to him by Stilpo, and, not being able to solve them on the spot, he was reproached by the king and, among other slights, the nickname Cronus was applied to him by way of derision. 2.115. Ptolemy Soter, they say, made much of him, and when he had got possession of Megara, offered him a sum of money and invited him to return with him to Egypt. But Stilpo would only accept a very moderate sum, and he declined the proposed journey, and removed to Aegina until Ptolemy set sail. Again, when Demetrius, the son of Antigonus, had taken Megara, he took measures that Stilpo's house should be preserved and all his plundered property restored to him. But when he requested that a schedule of the lost property should be drawn up, Stilpo denied that he had lost anything which really belonged to him, for no one had taken away his learning, while he still had his eloquence and knowledge. 2.120. Nine dialogues of his are extant written in frigid style, Moschus, Aristippus or Callias, Ptolemy, Chaerecrates, Metrocles, Anaximenes, Epigenes, To his Daughter, Aristotle. Heraclides relates that Zeno, the founder of the Stoic school, was one of Stilpo's pupils; Hermippus that Stilpo died at a great age after taking wine to hasten his end.I have written an epitaph on him also:Surely you know Stilpo the Megarian; old age and then disease laid him low, a formidable pair. But he found in wine a charioteer too strong for that evil team; he quaffed it eagerly and was borne along.He was also ridiculed by Sophilus the Comic poet in his drama The Wedding:What Charinus says is just Stilpo's stoppers. 4.44. I have given Diogenes my will to be conveyed to you. For, owing to my frequent illnesses and the weak state of my body, I decided to make a will, in order that, if anything untoward should happen, you, who have been so devotedly attached to me, should not suffer by my decease. You are the most deserving of all those in this place to be entrusted with the will, on the score both of age and of relationship to me. Remember then that I have reposed the most absolute confidence in you, and strive to deal justly by me, in order that, so far as you are concerned, the provisions I have made may be carried out with fitting dignity. A copy is deposited at Athens with some of my acquaintance, and another in Eretria with Amphicritus.He died, according to Hermippus, through drinking too freely of unmixed wine which affected his reason; he was already seventy-five and regarded by the Athenians with unparalleled good-will. 5.75. 5. DEMETRIUSDemetrius, the son of Phanostratus, was a native of Phalerum. He was a pupil of Theophrastus, but by his speeches in the Athenian assembly he held the chief power in the State for ten years and was decreed 360 bronze statues, most of them representing him either on horseback or else driving a chariot or a pair of horses. And these statues were completed in less than 300 days, so much was he esteemed. He entered politics, says Demetrius of Magnesia in his work on Men of the Same Name, when Harpalus, fleeing from Alexander, came to Athens. As a statesman he rendered his country many splendid services. For he enriched the city with revenues and buildings, though he was not of noble birth. 5.76. For he was one of Conon's household servants, according to Favorinus in the first book of his Memorabilia; yet Lamia, with whom he lived, was a citizen of noble family, as Favorinus also states in his first book. Further, in his second book Favorinus alleges that he suffered violence from Cleon, while Didymus in his Table-talk relates how a certain courtesan nicknamed him Charito-Blepharos (having the eyelids of the Graces), and Lampito (of shining eyes). He is said to have lost his sight when in Alexandria and to have recovered it by the gift of Sarapis; whereupon he composed the paeans which are sung to this day.For all his popularity with the Athenians he nevertheless suffered eclipse through all-devouring envy. 5.79. Here are my lines upon him:A venomous asp was the death of the wise Demetrius, an asp withal of sticky venom, darting, not light from its eyes, but black death.Heraclides in his epitome of Sotion's Successions of Philosophers says that Ptolemy himself wished to transmit the kingdom to Philadelphus, but that Demetrius tried to dissuade him, saying, If you give it to another, you will not have it yourself. At the time when he was being continually attacked in Athens, Meder, the Comic poet, as I have also learnt, was very nearly brought to trial for no other cause than that he was a friend of Demetrius. However, Telesphorus, the nephew of Demetrius, begged him off.In the number of his works and their total length in lines he has surpassed almost all contemporary Peripatetics. For in learning and versatility he ha 5.80. no equal. Some of these works are historical and others political; there are some dealing with poets, others with rhetoric. Then there are public speeches and reports of embassies, besides collections of Aesop's fables and much else. He wrote:of Legislation at Athens, five books.of the Constitutions of Athens, two books.of Statesmanship, two books.On Politics, two books.of Laws, one book.On Rhetoric, two books.On Military Matters, two books. 5.81. On the Iliad, two books.On the Odyssey, four books.And the following works, each in one book:Ptolemy.Concerning Love.Phaedondas.Maedon.Cleon.Socrates.Artaxerxes.Concerning Homer.Aristides.Aristomachus.An Exhortation to Philosophy.of the Constitution.On the ten years of his own Supremacy.of the Ionians.Concerning Embassies.of Belief.of Favour.of Fortune.of Magimity.of Marriage.of the Beam in the Sky.of Peace.On Laws.On Customs.of Opportunity.Dionysius.Concerning Chalcis.A Denunciation of the Athenians.On Antiphanes.Historical Introduction.Letters.A Sworn Assembly.of Old Age.Rights.Aesop's Fables.Anecdotes. 5.82. His style is philosophical, with an admixture of rhetorical vigour and force. When he heard that the Athenians had destroyed his statues, That they may do, said he, but the merits which caused them to be erected they cannot destroy. He used to say that the eyebrows formed but a small part of the face, and yet they can darken the whole of life by the scorn they express. Again, he said that not only was Plutus blind, but his guide, Fortune, as well; that all that steel could achieve in war was won in politics by eloquence. On seeing a young dandy, There, quoth he, is a four-square Hermes for you, with trailing robe, belly, beard and all. When men are haughty and arrogant, he declared we should cut down their tall stature and leave them their spirit unimpaired. Children should honour their parents at home, out-of-doors everyone they meet, and in solitude themselves. 5.84. (8) the sophist who lived at Alexandria, author of handbooks of rhetoric; (9) a grammarian of Adramyttium, surnamed Ixion because he was thought to be unjust to Hera; (10) a grammarian of Cyrene, surnamed Wine-jar, an eminent man; (11) a native of Scepsis, a man of wealth and good birth, ardently devoted to learning; he was also the means of bringing his countryman Metrodorus into prominence; (12) a grammarian of Erythrae enrolled as a citizen of Lemnos; (13) a Bithynian, son of Diphilus the Stoic and pupil of Panaetius of Rhodes; 5.85. (14) a rhetorician of Smyrna. The foregoing were prose authors. of poets bearing this name the first belonged to the Old Comedy; the second was an epic poet whose lines to the envious alone survive:While he lives they scorn the man whom they regret when he is gone; yet, some day, for the honour of his tomb and lifeless image, contention seizes cities and the people set up strife;the third of Tarsus, writer of satires; the fourth, a writer of lampoons, in a bitter style; the fifth, a sculptor mentioned by Polemo; the sixth, of Erythrae, a versatile man, who also wrote historical and rhetorical works. 6.99. 8. MENIPPUSMenippus, also a Cynic, was by descent a Phoenician – a slave, as Achacus in his treatise on Ethics says. Diocles further informs us that his master was a citizen of Pontus and was named Baton. But as avarice made him very resolute in begging, he succeeded in becoming a Theban.There is no seriousness in him; but his books overflow with laughter, much the same as those of his contemporary Meleager.Hermippus says that he lent out money by the day and got a nickname from doing so. For he used to make loans on bottomry and take security, thus accumulating a large fortune. 7.184. At last, however, – so we are told by Sotion in his eighth book, – he joined Arcesilaus and Lacydes and studied philosophy under them in the Academy. And this explains his arguing at one time against, and at another in support of, ordinary experience, and his use of the method of the Academy when treating of magnitudes and numbers.On one occasion, as Hermippus relates, when he had his school in the Odeum, he was invited by his pupils to a sacrificial feast. There after he had taken a draught of sweet wine unmixed with water, he was seized with di7iness and departed this life five days afterwards, having reached the age of seventy-three years, in the 143rd Olympiad. This is the date given by Apollodorus in his Chronology. I have toyed with the subject in the following verses:Chrysippus turned giddy after gulping down a draught of Bacchus; he spared not the Stoa nor his country nor his own life, but fared straight to the house of Hades. 9.43. of the death of Democritus the account given by Hermippus is as follows. When he was now very old and near his end, his sister was vexed that he seemed likely to die during the festival of Thesmophoria and she would be prevented from paying the fitting worship to the goddess. He bade her be of good cheer and ordered hot loaves to be brought to him every day. By applying these to his nostrils he contrived to outlive the festival; and as soon as the three festival days were passed he let his life go from him without pain, having then, according to Hipparchus, attained his one hundred and ninth year.In my Pammetros I have a piece on him as follows:Pray who was so wise, who wrought so vast a work as the omniscient Democritus achieved? When Death was near, for three days he kept him in his house and regaled him with the steam of hot loaves.Such was the life of our philosopher. 10.15. When he was thirty-two he founded a school of philosophy, first in Mitylene and Lampsacus, and then five years later removed to Athens, where he died in the second year of the 127th Olympiad, in the archonship of Pytharatus, at the age of seventy-two; and Hermarchus the son of Agemortus, a Mitylenaean, took over the School. Epicurus died of renal calculus after an illness which lasted a fortnight: so Hermarchus tells us in his letters. Hermippus relates that he entered a bronze bath of lukewarm water and asked for unmixed wine, which he swallowed
18. Ammianus Marcellinus, History, 22.12 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

19. Anon., Letter of Aristeas, 113-118, 3, 112

112. city, I mean, of the produce of husbandry. I have permitted this digression because it was Eleazar who pointed out with great clearness the points which have been mentioned. For great is the energy which they expend on the tillage of the soil. For the land is thickly planted with multitudes of olive trees, with crops of corn and pulse, with vines too, and there is abundance of honey. Other kinds of fruit trees and dates do not count compared with these. There are cattle of all kinds in


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
(great) library of alexandria, destruction by caliph umar i Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 77
(great) library of alexandria, destruction by julius caesar Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 77
(great) library of alexandria, destruction debate Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 77
(great) library of alexandria, royal patronage Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 511
(great) library of alexandria Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 77, 84, 86, 511
aelian Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 511
alexandria, and peripatetic critics Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 313
alexandria, philos perspective on Salvesen et al., Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period (2020) 223
alexandria Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180; Salvesen et al., Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period (2020) 223; Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112
arsinoe ii Salvesen et al., Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period (2020) 223
athenaeus Salvesen et al., Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period (2020) 223
athens, athenians Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180
athens Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 84, 86, 511; Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112
autocratic Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180
berenice Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112
brother Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112
building programme Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180
caliph ʿumar i Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 77
callimachus, and peripatetics Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 313
callimachus, critiqued by ancient authors Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 313
callimachus Salvesen et al., Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period (2020) 223; Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 77; Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112
christianity/christians, rioting/religious violence in alexandria by Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 77
cicero Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180; Salvesen et al., Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period (2020) 223
cimon Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180
court, royal/ptolemaic Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112
de sanctis, gaetano Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 88
death of philosophers Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 188
debate Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180
demetrius of phalerum, banished by ptolemy ii Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 84
demetrius of phalerum, in ciceros de finibus Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 86
demetrius of phalerum, on dreams Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 313
demetrius of phalerum, on old age Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 313
demetrius of phalerum, pagan testimonies Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 86
demetrius of phalerum Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 313; Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 88; Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180; Salvesen et al., Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period (2020) 223; Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 84, 86, 511; Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112
demochares Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180
democracy Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180
dialect Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112
diogenes laertius Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 88; Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180; Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 84, 86, 511; Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112
draco Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180
edwards, walter Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 88
exercise) Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 88
experience Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180
grube, g.m. Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 313
hebrew Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112
hellenistic ideology of kingship Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 88
hellenistic oratory Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 88
hermippus Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 188; Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112
hub l, alexandria as an educational hub Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 511
ideal, idealism Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180
influence, sources for Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 313
institution Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180
janko, richard Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 313
king Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112
körte, alfred Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 88
law, jewish/of moses Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112
literary criticism, hellenistic, callimachus and Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 313
macedonia/macedonian, cassander Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 84
memory, cultural Salvesen et al., Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period (2020) 223
mirror image Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180
museum/mouseion Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 511
narrative (διήγησις) Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112
nomothetes Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180
paideia Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 511
patrios politeia Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180
patronage, royal/ptolemaic Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112
pericles Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180
peripatetic criticism Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 313
philo of alexandria Salvesen et al., Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period (2020) 223
philos perspective Salvesen et al., Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period (2020) 223
philosophy, genre Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 109
philosophy, historiography Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 109
phocion Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180
pinakes (callimachus) Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 313
plutarch Salvesen et al., Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period (2020) 223
plutarch of athens Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 511
polites Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180
progymnasmata Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 88
ps.-aristeas Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112
ps.-demetrius, on style Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 313
pseudo-aristeas, authenticity Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 109
pseudo-aristeas, author Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 109
pseudo-aristeas, date, useless criteria Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 109
ptolemaic egypt, cultural funding Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 511
ptolemaic royal ideology vi Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 88
ptolemy i Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180; Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 84, 86, 511
ptolemy i soter Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 88; Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112
ptolemy ii' Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 109
ptolemy ii Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 84, 511
ptolemy ii philadelphos Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180
ptolemy ii philadelphus Salvesen et al., Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period (2020) 223; Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112
ptolemy keraunos Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180
ptolemy viii euergetes ii Salvesen et al., Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period (2020) 223
rhetorical exercises Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 88
septuagint/lxx, origins Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112
septuagint Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 86
solon Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 180
stobaeus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 313
strabo Salvesen et al., Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period (2020) 223
thebes Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112
theophrastus Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 84, 511
topos biographical Merz and Tieleman, Ambrosiaster's Political Theology (2012) 188
translation Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 112