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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



4479
Diogenes Laertius, Lives Of The Philosophers, 4.42


nanThere he had always shunned discussion over the wine; and when Aridices, proposing a certain question, requested him to speak upon it, he replied, The peculiar province of philosophy is just this, to know that there is a time for all things. As to the charge brought against him that he was the friend of the mob, Timon, among many other things, has the following:So saying, he plunged into the surrounding crowd. And they were amazed at him, like chaffinches about an owl, pointing him out as vain, because he was a flatterer of the mob. And why, insignificant thing that you are, do you puff yourself out like a simpleton?And yet for all that he was modest enough to recommend his pupils to hear other philosophers. And when a certain youth from Chios was not well pleased with his lectures and preferred those of the above-mentioned Hieronymus, Arcesilaus himself took him and introduced him to that philosopher, with an injunction to behave well.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

2 results
1. Cicero, Academica, 1.45 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.45. itaque Arcesilas negabat esse quicquam quod sciri posset, ne illud quidem ipsum quod Socrates sibi reliquisset, ut nihil scire se sciret; ut ... sciret om. *dn, cf. p. 7, 12 sic omnia latere censebat censebat s -bant *g*d in occulto neque esse quicquam quod cerni aut intellegi posset; possit *d quibus de causis nihil oportere neque profiteri neque affirmare quemquam quamquam p 1 ? sm neque assensione assertione *d approbare, cohibereque semper et ab omni lapsu continere temeritatem, quae tum tum p 2 s cum *g*d esset insignis cum tum sg m x aut falsa aut incognita res approbaretur, neque hoc quicquam esse esse s esset *g*d ( in ras. p ) turpius quam cognitioni et perceptioni assensionem assertionem *d assessionem f approbationemque praecurrere. huic rationi quod erat consentaneum faciebat, ut contra omnium sententias disserens disserens de sua *g dies iam *d de sua plerosque plerumque n pleresque gf pleros *d deduceret, deduceret et efficeret Pl. ut cum in eadem re paria contrariis in partibus momenta rationum invenirentur facilius ab utraque parte assensio ascensio mnf assertio *d sustineretur.
2. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 2.19, 3.7, 4.33, 7.15 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2.19. According to some authors he was a pupil of Anaxagoras, and also of Damon, as Alexander states in his Successions of Philosophers. When Anaxagoras was condemned, he became a pupil of Archelaus the physicist; Aristoxenus asserts that Archelaus was very fond of him. Duris makes him out to have been a slave and to have been employed on stonework, and the draped figures of the Graces on the Acropolis have by some been attributed to him. Hence the passage in Timon's Silli:From these diverged the sculptor, a prater about laws, the enchanter of Greece, inventor of subtle arguments, the sneerer who mocked at fine speeches, half-Attic in his mock humility.He was formidable in public speaking, according to Idomeneus; 3.7. Furthermore he said that, according to Homer, beyond all men the Egyptians were skilled in healing. Plato also intended to make the acquaintance of the Magians, but was prevented by the wars in Asia. Having returned to Athens, he lived in the Academy, which is a gymnasium outside the walls, in a grove named after a certain hero, Hecademus, as is stated by Eupolis in his play entitled Shirkers:In the shady walks of the divine Hecademus.Moreover, there are verses of Timon which refer to Plato:Amongst all of them Plato was the leader, a big fish, but a sweet-voiced speaker, musical in prose as the cicala who, perched on the trees of Hecademus, pours forth a strain as delicate as a lily. 4.33. Some represent him as emulous of Pyrrho as well. He was devoted to dialectic and adopted the methods of argument introduced by the Eretrian school. On account of this Ariston said of him:Plato the head of him, Pyrrho the tail, midway Diodorus.And Timon speaks of him thus:Having the lead of Menedemus at his heart, he will run either to that mass of flesh, Pyrrho, or to Diodorus.And a little farther on he introduces him as saying:I shall swim to Pyrrho and to crooked Diodorus.He was highly axiomatic and concise, and in his discourse fond of distinguishing the meaning of terms. He was satirical enough, and outspoken. 7.15. After Zeno's death Antigonus is reported to have said, What an audience I have lost. Hence too he employed Thraso as his agent to request the Athenians to bury Zeno in the Ceramicus. And when asked why he admired him, Because, said he, the many ample gifts I offered him never made him conceited nor yet appear poor-spirited.His bent was towards inquiry, and he was an exact reasoner on all subjects. Hence the words of Timon in his Silli:A Phoenician too I saw, a pampered old woman ensconced in gloomy pride, longing for all things; but the meshes of her subtle web have perished, and she had no more intelligence than a banjo.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aenesidemus Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 37
aulus gellius Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 37
diogenes laertius Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 154
humor in philosophy Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 51
photius Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 37
plato Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 51
polemo, teacher of zeno Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 154
progress, zeno making Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 154
searching for wisdom, stoics as followers of Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 154
skepticism, academic Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 37
socrates Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 51
stoicism Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 37
timon of phlius, on zeno Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 154
timon of phlius Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 51
tuphos, and zeno Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 154
typhon, stoic interpretation of Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 154
wisdom (sophia), and (a-)tuphos Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 154
wisdom (sophia), making progress' Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 154